Read by QxMD icon Read

Theta oscillation

Pia Lau, Andreas Wollbrink, Robert Wunderlich, Alva Engell, Alwina Löhe, Markus Junghöfer, Christo Pantev
Tinnitus is a prevalent phenomenon and bothersome for people affected by it. Its occurrence and maintenance have a clear neuroscientific tie and one aspect are differences in the neuronal oscillatory pattern, especially in auditory cortical areas. As studies in this field come to different results, the aim of this study was to analyze a large number of participants to achieve more stable results. Furthermore, we expanded our analysis to two variables of potential influence, namely being a novice to neuroscientific measurements and the exclusion of psychological comorbidities...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Daniel Ramirez-Gordillo, Ming Ma, Diego Restrepo
Neuromodulators such as noradrenaline appear to play a crucial role in learning and memory. The goal of this study was to determine the role of norepinephrine in representation of odorant identity and value by olfactory bulb oscillations in an olfactory learning task. We wanted to determine whether the different bandwidths of olfactory bulb oscillations encode information involved in associating the odor with the value, and whether norepinephrine is involved in modulating this association. To this end mice expressing halorhodopsin under the dopamine-beta-hydrolase (DBH) promoter received an optetrode implant targeted to the olfactory bulb...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Irene Navarro-Lobato, Lisa Genzel
Alternations of up and down can be seen across many different levels during sleep. Neural firing-rates, synaptic markers, molecular pathways, and gene expression all show differential up and down regulation across brain areas and sleep stages. And also the hallmarks of sleep - sleep stage specific oscillations - are characterized themselves by up and down as seen within the slow oscillation or theta cycles. In this review, we summarize the up and down of sleep covering molecules to electrophysiology and present different theories how this up and down could be regulated by the up and down of sleep oscillations...
March 12, 2018: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Michela Balconi, Laura Gatti, Maria Elide Vanutelli
Cooperation behavior is a core question of study on social neuroscience. In the present study, inter-brain functional connectivity and cognitive performance were considered during joint which was failing. The cognitive performance and the EEG (brain oscillations from delta to beta) underlying the execution of joint-actions were recorded when dyads of participants executed synchronicity game and received reinforcing negative feedbacks A pre-feedback condition (cooperation) and a control condition (individual task, T0) were provided as well as a check for possible learning effect (time series analysis)...
March 12, 2018: Consciousness and Cognition
Li-Yuan Chen, Maxime Lévesque, Mauro Cataldi, Massimo Avoli
The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) can induce activity in the theta range (4 - 15 Hz) in the entorhinal cortex (EC), but the underlying network mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the interplay between interneurons and principal cells in the EC during CCh-induced theta-like field oscillations in an in vitro brain slice preparation using tetrodes. Field oscillations at 10.1 Hz (IQR = 9.5 - 10.9 Hz) occurred during bath application of CCh (100 μM; n = 32 experiments) and were associated with single-unit (n = 189) firing...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience
Kathrin C J Eschmann, Regine Bader, Axel Mecklinger
Electrophysiological oscillations are assumed to be the core mechanism for large-scale network communication. The specific role of frontal-midline theta oscillations as cognitive control mechanism is under debate. According to the dual mechanisms of control framework, cognitive control processes can be divided into proactive and reactive control. The present study aimed at investigating the role of frontal-midline theta activity by assessing oscillations in two tasks varying in the type of cognitive control needed...
March 7, 2018: Brain and Cognition
Xin Wang, António Pinto-Duarte, M Margarita Behrens, Xianjin Zhou, Terrence J Sejnowski
Reduced expression of Sp4, the murine homolog of human SP4, a risk gene of multiple psychiatric disorders, led to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) hypofunction in mice, producing behavioral phenotypes reminiscent of schizophrenia, including hypersensitivity to ketamine. As accumulating evidence on molecular mechanisms and behavioral phenotypes established Sp4 hypomorphism as a promising animal model, systems-level neural circuit mechanisms of Sp4 hypomorphism, especially network dynamics underlying cognitive functions, remain poorly understood...
2018: PloS One
Jessica Page, Caroline Lustenberger, Flavio Fr Hlich
Widespread change in behavior and the underlying brain network substrate is a hallmark of early development. Sleep plays a fundamental role in this process. Both slow waves and spindles are key features of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) that exhibit pronounced developmental trajectories from infancy to adulthood. Yet, these prominent features of NREM sleep are poorly understood in infants and toddlers in the age range of 12 to 30 months. Moreover, it is unknown how network dynamics of NREM sleep are associated with outcomes of early development...
February 2, 2018: Sleep
Gunes Unal, Michael G Crump, Tim J Viney, Tímea Éltes, Linda Katona, Thomas Klausberger, Peter Somogyi
Medial septal GABAergic neurons of the basal forebrain innervate the hippocampus and related cortical areas, contributing to the coordination of network activity, such as theta oscillations and sharp wave-ripple events, via a preferential innervation of GABAergic interneurons. Individual medial septal neurons display diverse activity patterns, which may be related to their termination in different cortical areas and/or to the different types of innervated interneurons. To test these hypotheses, we extracellularly recorded and juxtacellularly labeled single medial septal neurons in anesthetized rats in vivo during hippocampal theta and ripple oscillations, traced their axons to distant cortical target areas, and analyzed their postsynaptic interneurons...
March 3, 2018: Brain Structure & Function
Torben Ott, Stephanie Westendorff, Andreas Nieder
Neural oscillations in distinct frequency bands in the prefrontal cortex (pFC) are associated with specialized roles during cognitive control. How dopamine modulates oscillations to structure pFC functions remains unknown. We trained macaques to switch between two numerical rules and recorded local field potentials from pFC while applying dopamine receptor targeting drugs using microiontophoresis. We show that the D1 and D2 family receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs, respectively) specifically altered internally generated prefrontal oscillations, whereas sensory-evoked potentials remained unchanged...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
George Parish, Simon Hanslmayr, Howard Bowman
Neural oscillations are important for memory formation in the brain. The de-synchronisation of Alpha (10Hz) oscillations in the neo-cortex has been shown to predict successful memory encoding and retrieval. However, when engaging in learning, it has been found that the hippocampus synchronises in Theta (4Hz) oscillations, and that learning is dependent on the phase of Theta. This inconsistency as to whether synchronisation is 'good' for memory formation leads to confusion over which oscillations we should expect to see and where during learning paradigm experiments...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Tara Arbab, Francesco P Battaglia, Cyriel M A Pennartz, Conrado A Bosman
Neuronal networks can synchronize their activity through excitatory and inhibitory connections, which is conducive to synaptic plasticity. This synchronization is reflected in rhythmic fluctuations of the extracellular field. In the hippocampus, theta and gamma band LFP oscillations are a hallmark of the processing of spatial information and memory. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an intellectual disability and the most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder (Belmonte and Bourgeron, 2006). Here, we investigated how neuronal network synchronization in the mouse hippocampus is compromised by the Fmr1 mutation that causes FXS (Santos et al...
February 24, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
Daniel E Callan, Thibault Gateau, Gautier Durantin, Nicolas Gonthier, Frédéric Dehais
Individuals often have reduced ability to hear alarms in real world situations (e.g., anesthesia monitoring, flying airplanes) when attention is focused on another task, sometimes with devastating consequences. This phenomenon is called inattentional deafness and usually occurs under critical high workload conditions. It is difficult to simulate the critical nature of these tasks in the laboratory. In this study, dry electroencephalography is used to investigate inattentional deafness in real flight while piloting an airplane...
February 26, 2018: Human Brain Mapping
Michela Balconi, Laura Gatti, Maria Elide Vanutelli
Introduction: The neural activity in response to ineffective joint actions was explored in the present study. Subjects involved in a cooperative but frustrating task (poor performance as manipulated by an external feedback) were required to cooperate (T1) during an attentional task in a way to synchronize their responses and obtain better outcomes. Methods: We manipulated their strategies by providing false feedbacks (T2) signaling the incapacity to create a synergy, which was reinforced by a general negative evaluation halfway through the game...
February 2018: Brain and Behavior
Yu-Kai Wang, Tzyy-Ping Jung, Chin-Teng Lin
Performing multiple tasks simultaneously usually affects the behavioral performance as compared with executing the single task. Moreover, processing multiple tasks simultaneously often involve more cognitive demands. Two visual tasks, lane-keeping task and mental calculation, were utilized to assess the brain dynamics through 32-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from 14 participants. A 400-ms stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) factor was used to induce distinct levels of attentional requirements. In the dual-task conditions, the deteriorated behavior reflected the divided attention and the overlapping brain resources used...
2018: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Laura Prieto Del Val, Jose L Cantero, Daniel Baena, Mercedes Atienza
In mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the APOE4 genotype is associated with accelerated memory decline, likely due to the impact of neuropathology on main cerebral networks required for successful memory retrieval and/or to decreased capacity for recruiting secondary networks that might compensate for that brain damage. Here, we tested this hypothesis in twenty-six healthy older adults and thirty-four MCI patients, of which sixteen were APOE4 carriers. Compared to controls, MCI showed hippocampal volume reduction, cortical thinning in frontal, temporal and parietal regions, and dysfunctional EEG oscillations across fronto-temporal networks...
February 2, 2018: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
A Kilias, U Häussler, K Heining, U P Froriep, C A Haas, U Egert
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by focal, recurrent spontaneous seizures, sclerosis and granule cell dispersion in the hippocampal formation. Changes in theta rhythm properties have been correlated with the severity of hippocampal restructuring and were suggested as a cause of memory deficits accompanying epilepsy. For severe sclerosis, it has even been questioned whether theta band oscillations persists. We asked how theta oscillations change with graded restructuring along the longitudinal hippocampal axis and whether these changes correlate with the overall severity of temporal lobe epilepsy...
February 23, 2018: Hippocampus
Aina Luque-García, Vicent Teruel-Martí, Sergio Martínez-Bellver, Albert Adell, Ana Cervera-Ferri, Joana Martínez-Ricós
The stress system coordinates the adaptive reactions of the organism to stressors. So, dysfunctions in this circuit may correlate to anxiety-related disorders, including depression. Comprehending the dynamics of this network may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie these diseases. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brainstem nodes by triggering endocrine, autonomic and behavioural stress responses. The medial prefrontal cortex plays a significant role in regulating reactions to stressors, and is specifically important for limiting fear responses...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Comparative Neurology
Dandan Zhang, Ruolei Gu
In daily life, people often make consecutive decisions before the ultimate goal is reached (i.e., sequential decision-making). However, this kind of decision-making has been largely overlooked in the literature. The current study investigated whether behavioral preference would change during sequential decisions, and the neural processes underlying the potential changes. For this purpose, we revised the classic balloon analogue risk task and recorded the electroencephalograph (EEG) signals associated with each step of decision-making...
February 21, 2018: Human Brain Mapping
YiYan Wang, Pingxiao Wang, Yuguo Yu
Increasing evidence indicates that the phase pattern and power of the low frequency oscillations of brain electroencephalograms (EEG) contain significant information during the human cognition of sensory signals such as auditory and visual stimuli. Here, we investigate whether and how the letters of the alphabet can be directly decoded from EEG phase and power data. In addition, we investigate how different band oscillations contribute to the classification and determine the critical time periods. An English letter recognition task was assigned, and statistical analyses were conducted to decode the EEG signal corresponding to each letter visualized on a computer screen...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"