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Akihisa Okumura, Shinpei Abe, Hirokazu Kurahashi, Michihiko Takasu, Mitsuru Ikeno, Mika Nakazawa, Ayuko Igarashi, Toshiaki Shimizu
To evaluate changes in the attitudes of nonmedical university students toward epilepsy in 2015, the present study compared the results of questionnaire surveys from four different time periods: before media coverage of epilepsy-related car accidents (2008-2010), during a period of abundant media coverage (2011-2012), after media coverage (2013-2014), and after novel media coverage (2015). The nonmedical students that completed the questionnaire were divided into four groups: 2008-2010, 2011-2012, 2013-2014, and 2015...
October 13, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Rebecca Ling, Joon Lee
BACKGROUND: Infodemiology can offer practical and feasible health research applications through the practice of studying information available on the Web. Google Trends provides publicly accessible information regarding search behaviors in a population, which may be studied and used for health campaign evaluation and disease monitoring. Additional studies examining the use and effectiveness of Google Trends for these purposes remain warranted. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore the use of infodemiology in the context of health campaign evaluation and chronic disease monitoring...
October 12, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Sofiane Mnadla, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, Mehdi Rouissi, Anis Chaalali, Anna Siri, Johnny Padulo, Luca Paolo Ardigò, Francesco Brigo, Karim Chamari, Beat Knechtle
This article reports data concerning the Internet-related activities and interest for Ironman Triathlon competition. Google Trends (GT) was used and mined from 2004 onwards. The interest for Ironman Triathlon was found to be cyclic over time. The Triathlon-related Internet activities negatively correlated with the number of finishers per year (Pearson׳s correlation r=-0.690, p-value<0.05), while an increasing participation of female athletes who were less likely to surf the Internet could be noticed (r=-0...
December 2016: Data in Brief
Hyekyung Woo, Youngtae Cho, Eunyoung Shim, Jong-Koo Lee, Chang-Gun Lee, Seong Hwan Kim
BACKGROUND: As suggested as early as in 2006, logs of queries submitted to search engines seeking information could be a source for detection of emerging influenza epidemics if changes in the volume of search queries are monitored (infodemiology). However, selecting queries that are most likely to be associated with influenza epidemics is a particular challenge when it comes to generating better predictions. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we describe a methodological extension for detecting influenza outbreaks using search query data; we provide a new approach for query selection through the exploration of contextual information gleaned from social media data...
2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Li Du, Christen Rachul, Zhaochen Guo, Timothy Caulfield
BACKGROUND: Former Detroit Red Wing Gordie Howe received stem cell (SC) treatment in Mexico in December 2014 for a stroke he suffered in October 2014. The news about his positive response to the SC treatment prompted discussion on social networks like Twitter. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide information about discussions that took place on Twitter regarding Howe's SC treatment and SC treatment in general. In particular, this study examines whether tweets portrayed a positive or negative attitude towards Howe's SC treatment, whether or not tweets mention that the treatment is unproven, and whether the tweets mention risks associated with the SC treatment...
January 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Chad Priest, Amelia Knopf, Doyle Groves, Janet S Carpenter, Christopher Furrey, Anand Krishnan, Wendy R Miller, Julie L Otte, Mathew Palakal, Sarah Wiehe, Jeffrey Wilson
BACKGROUND: The development of effective health care and public health interventions requires a comprehensive understanding of the perceptions, concerns, and stated needs of health care consumers and the public at large. Big datasets from social media and question-and-answer services provide insight into the public's health concerns and priorities without the financial, temporal, and spatial encumbrances of more traditional community-engagement methods and may prove a useful starting point for public-engagement health research (infodemiology)...
2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Eradah O Hamad, Marie Y Savundranayagam, Jeffrey D Holmes, Elizabeth Anne Kinsella, Andrew M Johnson
BACKGROUND: Twitter's 140-character microblog posts are increasingly used to access information and facilitate discussions among health care professionals and between patients with chronic conditions and their caregivers. Recently, efforts have emerged to investigate the content of health care-related posts on Twitter. This marks a new area for researchers to investigate and apply content analysis (CA). In current infodemiology, infoveillance and digital disease detection research initiatives, quantitative and qualitative Twitter data are often combined, and there are no clear guidelines for researchers to follow when collecting and evaluating Twitter-driven content...
2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Yoonsang Kim, Jidong Huang, Sherry Emery
BACKGROUND: Social media have transformed the communications landscape. People increasingly obtain news and health information online and via social media. Social media platforms also serve as novel sources of rich observational data for health research (including infodemiology, infoveillance, and digital disease detection detection). While the number of studies using social data is growing rapidly, very few of these studies transparently outline their methods for collecting, filtering, and reporting those data...
2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Francesco Brigo, Roberto Erro
Millions of people worldwide everyday search Google or Wikipedia to look for health-related information. Aim of this study was to evaluate and interpret web search queries for terms related to movement disorders (MD) in English-speaking countries and their changes over time. We analyzed information regarding the volume of online searches in Google and Wikipedia for the most common MD and their treatments. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines...
May 2016: Neurological Sciences
Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, Susanna Bacigaluppi, Chiara Robba, Raffaele Nardone, Eugen Trinka, Francesco Brigo
People increasingly use Google looking for health-related information. We previously demonstrated that in English-speaking countries most people use this search engine to obtain information on status epilepticus (SE) definition, types/subtypes, and treatment. Now, we aimed at providing a quantitative analysis of SE-related web queries. This analysis represents an advancement, with respect to what was already previously discussed, in that the Google Trends (GT) algorithm has been further refined and correlational analyses have been carried out to validate the GT-based query volumes...
February 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Francesco Brigo, Willem M Otte, Stanley C Igwe, Harald Ausserer, Raffaele Nardone, Frediano Tezzon, Eugen Trinka
Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopaedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. Our aim was to evaluate information-seeking behaviour of English-speaking internet users searching Wikipedia for articles related to epilepsy and epileptic seizures. Using Wiki Trends, which provides quantitative information on daily viewing of articles, data on global search queries for Wikipedia articles related to epilepsy and seizures were analysed...
December 2015: Epileptic Disorders: International Epilepsy Journal with Videotape
Francesco Brigo, Piergiorgio Lochner, Frediano Tezzon, Raffaele Nardone
OBJECTIVE: Millions of people worldwide use the Internet daily as a source of health information. Google is the most popular search engine and is used by patients and physicians to search for online health-related information. This study aimed to evaluate changes in Web search behavior occurring in English-speaking countries over time for the term "multiple sclerosis" (MS). METHODS: Using Google Trends, data on global search queries for the term "multiple sclerosis" between January 2004 and December 2013 were analyzed...
July 2014: Multiple Sclerosis and related Disorders
Hajime Sueki
BACKGROUND: Infodemiology studies for suicide prevention have become increasingly common in recent years. However, the association between Twitter use and suicide has only been partially clarified. This study examined the association between suicide-related tweets and suicidal behaviour to identify suicidal young people on the Internet. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using Internet survey panels (n=220,848) comprising users in their 20s, through a major Japanese Internet survey company...
January 1, 2015: Journal of Affective Disorders
José Carlos Santos, Sérgio Matos
BACKGROUND: Social media platforms encourage people to share diverse aspects of their daily life. Among these, shared health related information might be used to infer health status and incidence rates for specific conditions or symptoms. In this work, we present an infodemiology study that evaluates the use of Twitter messages and search engine query logs to estimate and predict the incidence rate of influenza like illness in Portugal. RESULTS: Based on a manually classified dataset of 2704 tweets from Portugal, we selected a set of 650 textual features to train a Naïve Bayes classifier to identify tweets mentioning flu or flu-like illness or symptoms...
May 7, 2014: Theoretical Biology & Medical Modelling
Melvyn W B Zhang, Cyrus S H Ho, Pan Fang, Yanxia Lu, Roger C M Ho
BACKGROUND: Recent advancement in Internet based technologies have resulted in the growth of a sub-specialized field, termed as "Infodemiology" and "Infoveillance". Infoveillence refers to the collation of infodemiology measures for the purpose of surveillance and trending. Previous research has only demonstrated the research potential of Web 2.0 medium in collation of data in crisis situation. OBJECTIVES: The objectives for the current study are to demonstrate the methodology of implementation of a smartphone-based application for dissemination and collation of information during a crisis situation...
2014: Technology and Health Care: Official Journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine
Haruka Nakada, Koichiro Yuji, Masaharu Tsubokura, Yukio Ohsawa, Masahiro Kami
BACKGROUND: A national agreement on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was achieved relatively quickly in Japan as compared to the United States and India. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to identify the role of print and online media references, including references to celebrities or other informants, as factors potentially responsible for the relatively rapid national acceptance of HPV vaccination in Japan. METHODS: A method of text mining was performed to select keywords, representing the context of the target documents, from articles relevant to the promotion of HPV vaccination appearing in major Japanese newspapers and Web pages between January 2009 and July 2010...
2014: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Thiago D Nascimento, Marcos F DosSantos, Theodora Danciu, Misty DeBoer, Hendrik van Holsbeeck, Sarah R Lucas, Christine Aiello, Leen Khatib, MaryCatherine A Bender, Jon-Kar Zubieta, Alexandre F DaSilva
BACKGROUND: Although population studies have greatly improved our understanding of migraine, they have relied on retrospective self-reports that are subject to memory error and experimenter-induced bias. Furthermore, these studies also lack specifics from the actual time that attacks were occurring, and how patients express and share their ongoing suffering. OBJECTIVE: As technology and language constantly evolve, so does the way we share our suffering. We sought to evaluate the infodemiology of self-reported migraine headache suffering on Twitter...
2014: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Minki Kim, Yuchul Jung, Dain Jung, Cinyoung Hur
BACKGROUND: Health 2.0 is a benefit to society by helping patients acquire knowledge about health care by harnessing collective intelligence. However, any misleading information can directly affect patients' choices of hospitals and drugs, and potentially exacerbate their health condition. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the congruence between crowdsourced information and official government data in the health care domain and identifies the determinants of low congruence where it exists...
2014: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Nicola Luigi Bragazzi
Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is an intentional, direct, and socially unacceptable behavior resulting in the destruction of one's own body tissues with no intention of dying or committing suicide, even though it is associated with a higher risk of attempted, planned, or just considered suicide. In this preliminary report, we introduce the concept of "NSSI 2.0"; that is to say, the study of the Internet usage by subjects with NSSI, and we introduce a Google Trends-based approach for monitoring NSSI, called NSSI infodemiology and infoveillance...
2013: Psychology Research and Behavior Management
Francesco Brigo, Stanley C Igwe, Harald Ausserer, Raffaele Nardone, Frediano Tezzon, Luigi Giuseppe Bongiovanni, Eugen Trinka
Millions of people worldwide use the Internet daily as a source of health information. Google is the most popular search engine and is used by patients and physicians to search for online health-related information. This study aimed to evaluate changes in web search behavior occurring in English-speaking countries over time for terms related to epilepsy and epileptic seizures. Using Google Trends, data on global search queries for the terms "epilepsy", "seizure", and "seizures" between January 2004 and September 2013 were analyzed...
February 2014: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
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