Read by QxMD icon Read

Workplace health

Antonio Pangallo, Lara Zibarras, Fiona Patterson
OBJECTIVES: Relatively little research has been directed toward the assessment of resilience in the health care context. Given the stressors associated with the provision of health care, the present study describes the development and evaluation of a situational judgement test (SJT) designed to assess resilience in palliative care health care workers. METHODS: An SJT was developed to measure behaviours associated with resilience in a palliative care context. Next, SJT reliability and validity analyses were assessed in a sample of acute ward, hospice and community palliative care workers (n = 284)...
November 2016: Medical Education
Chad Rittle
Occupational health nurses are familiar with environmental exposures workers encounter in their workplaces. However, employees are only "on-the-job" about one third of each workday, with a multitude of potential exposures in other environments that can affect their health. This article addresses some of the major exposures employees encounter outside the workplace-air, water, and soil pollution, and hazardous wastes-including a discussion of several well-known national and international environmental incidents...
October 19, 2016: Workplace Health & Safety
Catherine Utecht Graeve, Patricia Marie McGovern, Bruce Alexander, Timothy Church, Andrew Ryan, Martha Polovich
Approximately 8 million health care workers are unnecessarily exposed to highly toxic drugs used to treat cancer; antineoplastic drugs can contribute to negative health effects for these workers. The drugs have been detected in the urine of workers and on the floors and counters of worksites. Safety precautions that could reduce the risk of exposure are underutilized. This cross-sectional study of 163 oncology health care workers used a survey to measure workplace and individual factors, and environmental sampling to measure surface contamination...
October 6, 2016: Workplace Health & Safety
Susan Peters, Venerina Johnston, Sonia Hines, Mark Ross, Michel Coppieters
BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common problem, that can be effectively managed by surgery. Screening for prognostic factors is important to identify workers who are at a greater risk of a poor work outcome in order to implement tailored interventions to facilitate their return-to-work. OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the association of preoperative prognostic factors with work-related outcomes in people who have undergone carpal tunnel surgery...
September 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
Roberta Fida, Heather K Spence Laschinger, Michael P Leiter
BACKGROUND: Incivility has negative consequences in the workplace and remains a prevalent issue in nursing. Research has consistently linked incivility to nurse burnout and, in turn, to poor mental health and turnover intentions. To retain high-quality nurses, it is important to understand what factors might protect nurses from the negative effects of workplace mistreatment. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the role of relational occupational coping self-efficacy in protecting nurses from workplace incivility and related burnout and turnover intentions...
October 14, 2016: Health Care Management Review
Arturo Vargas Bustamante, Ana Martinez, Xiao Chen, Hector P Rodriguez
We examine whether workplace climate-quality of staff relationships (QSR) and manageable clinic workload (MCW) are related to better patient care experiences and diabetes care in community health centers (CHCs) catering to Latino and Chinese patients. Patient experience surveys of adult patients with type 2 diabetes and workplace climate surveys of clinicians and staff from CHCs were included in an analytic sample. Comparisons of means analyses examine patient and provider characteristics. The associations of QSR, MCW and the diabetes care management were examined using regression analyses...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Oline Anita Bjørkelund, Hanna Degerud, Elling Bere
BACKGROUND: Cycling and brisk-walking to work represents an opportunity to incorporate sustainable transport related moderate- to- vigorous physical activity (MVPA) into daily routine among adults, and thus, may make an important contributing to health. Despite the fact that walking and cycling is an option for many commuters and also brings a number of benefits, a considerable proportion of commuters choose to use other means of transport when cycling and walking would be a highly appropriate transport mode...
2016: Archives of Public Health, Archives Belges de Santé Publique
Emily Bariola, Gavin Jack, Marian Pitts, Kathleen Riach, Philip Sarrel
OBJECTIVE: While many women undergo menopausal transition while they are in paid employment, the effect of poor working conditions on women's experience of the menopause has received scant empirical attention. We examined associations between employment conditions, work-related stressors, and menopausal symptom reporting among perimenopausal and postmenopausal working women. METHODS: Data were drawn from an online survey conducted between 2013 and 2014 involving 476 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women working in the higher education sector in Australia...
October 3, 2016: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
Eija Haukka, Anneli Ojajärvi, Leena Kaila-Kangas, Päivi Leino-Arjas
We identified factors protective of all-cause sickness absence (SA) among subjects with multisite musculoskeletal pain (MSP). The nationally representative source sample comprised 3420 actively working Finns aged 30-55 in year 2000 and alive at follow-up. Pain in 18 body locations was combined into four sites (neck, low back, upper limbs, lower limbs). The baseline prevalence of MSP (pain in ≥ 2 sites) was 32 %. Baseline data on sociodemographic factors, work ability, work, health, and lifestyle were gathered by questionnaire, interview and clinical examination and linked with national registers on all-cause SA (periods lasting ≥10 workdays) for 2002-2008...
October 3, 2016: Pain
Angel M Dzhambov
There is compelling evidence from animal experiments that noise exposure suppresses testosterone in males by affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Virtually nothing is known about its effect in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the association between occupational noise exposure and serum testosterone in a representative sample of the general population. The sample has been taken from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data for the period between 1999 and 2004 and is limited to employed men aged 16-85+ years at the time...
September 1, 2016: Arhiv za Higijenu Rada i Toksikologiju
Laura M Schwab-Reese, Marizen Ramirez, Sato Ashida, Corinne Peek-Asa
INTRODUCTION: For new mothers returning to work, the role of the workplace psychosocial environment on maternal mental health has not been fully described. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between psychosocial employment characteristics and mothers' postpartum depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. METHODS: Ninety-seven women answered survey questions regarding employment, job demand, control, and support, and postpartum depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms soon after live birth and 6 months later...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Natália Martinez Fernandes, Isadora Gonçalves Pelissari, Licia Assunção Cogo, Valdete Alves Valentins Dos Santos Filha
Introduction The manipulation of antineoplastic drugs presents high risk for accidents and occupational diseases. Objective To evaluate the auditory and vestibular systems of workers who are exposed to chemotherapeutic treatment in the University Hospital of Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, and to identify the use of individual protection equipment, related to the obtained results. Methods This study is a cross-sectional study using a quantitative method. We evaluate 33 male and female workers, ranging from 21-60 years old, of the nursing and pharmacy sectors...
October 2016: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
Antionette Lavender, Viani Ramirez-Irizarry, A Rana Bayakly, Carol Koplan, J Michael Bryan
INTRODUCTION: Workers in certain occupations may be at an increased risk of a violent-related death such as homicide or suicide. The purpose of this study is to describe rates of violent deaths among Georgia workers by occupation, including cases occurring at work and outside of the workplace, and identify leading circumstances surrounding suicides and homicides for the occupations most at risk. METHODS: Data from the 2006-2009 Georgia Violent Death Reporting System were used...
November 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Anne C Grunseit, Samantha Rowbotham, Melanie Pescud, Devon Indig, Sonia Wutzke
Issue addressed: The Australian National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health (NPAPH) charged states and territories with the development and implementation of the Healthy Workers Initiative (HWI) to improve workplace health promotion. Most evaluation efforts focus on the setting (micro) level. In the present study the HWI at the meso-level (state program development) was examined to understand how jurisdictions navigated theoretical, practical, and political priorities to develop their programs, and the programmatic choices that support or hinder perceived success...
October 13, 2016: Health Promotion Journal of Australia
Kathleen P Conte, Michelle C Odden, Natalie M Linton, S Marie Harvey
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of Walk With Ease (WWE), an evidence-based arthritis self-management program that was scaled up in Oregon in 2012 to 2014. METHODS: Guided by the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework, we collected participant surveys and attendance records and conducted observations. Preprogram and postprogram, participants self-reported pain and fatigue (scale: 0-10 points; high scores indicate more pain and fatigue) and estimated episodes of physical activity per week in the last month...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Public Health
Behdin Nowrouzi, Emilia Giddens, Basem Gohar, Sandrine Schoenenberger, Mary Christine Bautista, Jennifer Casole
BACKGROUND: Workplace environment is related to the physical and psychological well-being, and quality of work life (QWL) for nurses. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to perform a comprehensive literature review on nurses' quality of work life to identify a comprehensive set of QWL predictors for nurses employed in the United States and Canada. METHODS: Using publications from 2004-2014, contributing factors to American and Canadian nurses' QWL were analyzed...
October 13, 2016: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health
Rachel Nicholls, Lin Perry, Christine Duffield, Robyn Gallagher, Heather Pierce
BACKGROUND: There is growing recognition of the influence of the workplace environment on the eating habits of the workforce, which in turn may contribute to increased overweight and obesity. Overweight and obesity exact enormous costs in terms of reduced well-being, worker productivity and increased risk of non-communicable diseases. The workplace is an ideal place to intervene and support healthy behaviours. This review aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to nurses' healthy eating in the workplace...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Holly Blake, Natalia Stanulewicz, Francesca McGill
AIMS: To investigate physical activity levels of nursing and medicine students; examine predictors of physical activity level; and examine the most influential benefits and barriers to exercise. BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals have low levels of physical activity, which increases their health risk and may influence their health promotion practices with patients. DESIGN: We surveyed 361 nursing (n=193) and medicine (n=168) students studying at a UK medical school...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Johanna Stranzinger, Jutta Kindel, Melanie Henning, Dana Wendeler, Albert Nienhaus
Background: Staff in children's hospitals may run an increased risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) contact infection leading to a congenital CMV fetopathy during pregnancy. The main risk factor is close contact with inapparent carriers of CMV among infants (<3 years). We therefore examined CMV seroprevalence (SP) and possible risk factors for CMV infection among staff at a children's hospital. Method: In 2014, staff at a metropolitan children's hospital were offered a CMV antibody test in the context of occupational health screening...
2016: GMS Hygiene and Infection Control
Paola Ferri, Monica Silvestri, Cecilia Artoni, Rosaria Di Lorenzo
BACKGROUND: Workplace violence (WPV) against health professionals is a global problem with an increasing incidence. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to examine the frequency and characteristics of WPV in different settings and professionals of a general hospital and 2) to identify the clinical and organizational factors related to this phenomenon. METHODS: The study was cross-sectional. In a 1-month period, we administered the "Violent Incident Form" to 745 professionals (physicians, head nurses, nurses, nursing assistants), who worked in 15 wards of a general hospital in northern Italy...
2016: Psychology Research and Behavior Management
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"