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Cletus Cheyuo, Walter Grand, Lucia L Balos
BACKGROUND: Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging...
October 15, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Astrid Kibleur, Mircea Polosan, Pauline Favre, David Rudrauf, Thierry Bougerol, Stéphan Chabardès, Olivier David
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subgenual cingulate gyrus (area CG25) is beneficial in treatment resistant depression. Though the mechanisms of action of Cg25 DBS remain largely unknown, it is commonly believed that Cg25 DBS modulates limbic activity of large networks to achieve thymic regulation of patients. To investigate how emotional attention is influenced by Cg25 DBS, we assessed behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to an emotional Stroop task in 5 patients during ON and OFF stimulation conditions...
October 12, 2016: NeuroImage
Judith Kandel, Alessia A Angelin, Douglas C Wallace, David M Eckmann
An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration...
October 13, 2016: Integrative Biology: Quantitative Biosciences From Nano to Macro
Yi Pang, Xuemei Dai, Anna Roller, Kathleen Carter, Ian Paul, Abhay J Bhatt, Rick C S Lin, Lir-Wan Fan
Perinatal infection is a well-identified risk factor for a number of neurodevelopmental disorders, including brain white matter injury (WMI) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The underlying mechanisms by which early life inflammatory events cause aberrant neural, cytoarchitectural, and network organization, remain elusive. This study is aimed to investigate how systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation affects microglia phenotypes and early neural developmental events in rats. We show here that LPS exposure at early postnatal day 3 leads to a robust microglia activation which is characterized with mixed microglial proinflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes...
2016: PloS One
Oyinbo A Charles, Igbigbi S Patrick, Avwioro O Godwin
BACKGROUND: Alcohol-induced neurodegeneration, a consequence of chronic ethanol exposure, is a neuroadaptation that drives the progression of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Unfortunately, conventional drugs for AUDs do not prevent neurodegeneration as part of their pharmacological repertoire. Multimodal neuroprotective therapeutic agents are hypothesized to have high therapeutic utility in the treatment of central nervous system. Interestingly, nutraceuticals by nature are multimodal in mechanisms of action...
September 2016: Annals of Neurosciences
Se-Jin Jeong, Chang-Jin Jeon
The purpose of this study was to determine whether the superior colliculus (SC) of the microbat has the same neurochemical makeup as that of other mammals. We examined the organization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)- and tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) fibers/cells using standard immunohistochemistry with antibodies against ChAT and TH. ChAT-IR fibers observed in the superficial layers were denser than those in the deeper layers, and these fibers were classified into two types: small varicose fibers and large varicose fibers...
September 29, 2016: Histology and Histopathology
Felipe Mora-Bermúdez, Farhath Badsha, Sabina Kanton, J Gray Camp, Benjamin Vernot, Kathrin Köhler, Birger Voigt, Keisuke Okita, Tomislav Maricic, Zhisong He, Robert Lachmann, Svante Pääbo, Barbara Treutlein, Wieland B Huttner
Human neocortex expansion likely contributed to the remarkable cognitive abilities of humans. This expansion is thought to primarily reflect differences in proliferation versus differentiation of neural progenitors during cortical development. Here, we have searched for such differences by analysing cerebral organoids from human and chimpanzees using immunohistochemistry, live imaging, and single-cell transcriptomics. We find that the cytoarchitecture, cell type composition, and neurogenic gene expression programs of humans and chimpanzees are remarkably similar...
September 26, 2016: ELife
Emmanuel Matas, Jörg Bock, Katharina Braun
The development of the brain depends on an individual's nature (genes) and nurture (environments). This interaction between genetic predispositions and environmental events during brain development drives the maturation of functional brain circuits such as sensory, motor, emotional, and complex cognitive pathways. Adverse environmental conditions such as early life stress can interfere with the functional development of emotional and cognitive brain systems and thereby increase the risk of developing psychiatric disorders later in life...
September 27, 2016: Psychopathology
Yoshihisa Ishihara, Takaichi Fukuda
The subiculum is the output component of the hippocampal formation and holds a key position in the neural circuitry of memory. Previous studies have demonstrated the subiculum's connectivity to other brain areas in detail; however, little is known regarding its internal structure. We investigated the cytoarchitecture of the temporal and mid-septotemporal parts of the subiculum using immunohistochemistry. The border between the CA1 region and subiculum was determined by both cytoarchitecture and zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3)-immunoreactivity (IR), whereas the border between the subiculum and presubiculum (PreS) was partially indicated by glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1)-IR...
September 21, 2016: Neuroscience
Tiffany V Lin, Lawrence Hsieh, Tomoki Kimura, Taylor J Malone, Angélique Bordey
Hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a shared molecular hallmark in several neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormal brain cytoarchitecture. The mechanisms downstream of mTORC1 that are responsible for these defects remain unclear. We show that focally increasing mTORC1 activity during late corticogenesis leads to ectopic placement of upper-layer cortical neurons that does not require altered signaling in radial glia and is accompanied by changes in layer-specific molecular identity...
October 4, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
David A Hess, Katherine M Strelau, Anju Karki, Mei Jiang, Ana C Azevedo-Pouly, Ann-Hwee Lee, Tye G Deering, Chinh Q Hoang, Raymond J MacDonald, Stephen F Konieczny
Transcriptional networks that govern secretory cell specialization, including instructing cells to develop a unique cytoarchitecture, amass extensive protein synthesis machinery, and be embodied to respond to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, we discovered that the secretory cell transcription factor MIST1 (Bhlha15), previously shown to be essential for cytoskeletal organization and secretory activity, also functions as a potent ER stress-inducible transcriptional regulator...
September 19, 2016: Molecular and Cellular Biology
David S Gokhin, Velia M Fowler
The periodically arranged thin filaments within the striated myofibrils of skeletal and cardiac muscle have precisely regulated lengths, which can change in response to developmental adaptations, pathophysiological states, and genetic perturbations. We have developed a user-friendly, open-source ImageJ plugin that provides a graphical user interface (GUI) for super-resolution measurement of thin filament lengths by applying Distributed Deconvolution (DDecon) analysis to periodic line scans collected from fluorescence images...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Microscopy
Emilie Legué, Jackie L Gottshall, Edouard Jaumouillé, Alberto Roselló-Díez, Wei Shi, Luis Humberto Barraza, Senna Washington, Rachel L Grant, Alexandra L Joyner
BACKGROUND: The mouse cerebellum (Cb) has a remarkably complex foliated three-dimensional (3D) structure, but a stereotypical cytoarchitecture and local circuitry. Little is known of the cellular behaviors and genes that function during development to determine the foliation pattern. In the anteroposterior axis the mammalian cerebellum is divided by lobules with distinct sizes, and the foliation pattern differs along the mediolateral axis defining a medial vermis and two lateral hemispheres...
2016: Neural Development
Huali Wu, Junyi Feng, Wenting Lv, Qiaoling Huang, Mengsi Fu, Minxuan Cai, Qiangqiang He, Jing Shang
Dermatosis often as a chronic disease requires effective long-term treatment; a comprehensive evaluation of mental health of dermatology drug does not receive enough attention. An interaction between dermatology and psychiatry has been increasingly described. Substantial evidence has accumulated that psychological stress can be associated with pigmentation, endocrine and immune systems in skin to create the optimal responses against pathogens and other physicochemical stressors to maintain or restore internal homeostasis...
2016: PloS One
Jing Yang Tee, Ratneswary Sutharsan, Yongjun Fan, Alan Mackay-Sim
Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls...
2016: NPJ Schizophrenia
Joaquín Martí, Vanesa Molina, M C Santa-Cruz, José P Hervás
Postnatal development of the cerebellar cortex was studied in rats administered with a single dose (2 mg/g) of the cytotoxic agent hydroxyurea (HU) on postnatal day (P) 9 and collected at appropriate times ranging from 6 h to 45 days. Quantification of several parameters such as the density of pyknotic, mitotic, BrdU-positive, and vimentin-stained cells revealed that HU compromises the survival of the external granular layer (EGL) cells. Moreover, vimentin immunocytochemistry revealed overexpression and thicker immunoreactive glial processes in HU-treated rats...
September 6, 2016: Neurotoxicity Research
Juan Carlos Rosillo, Maximiliano Torres, Silvia Olivera-Bravo, Gabriela Casanova, José Manuel García-Verdugo, Anabel Sonia Fernández
Adult neurogenesis participates in fish olfaction sensitivity in response to environmental challenges. Therefore, we investigated if several populations of stem/progenitor cells that are retained in the olfactory bulbs (OB) may constitute different neurogenic niches that support growth and functional demands. By electron microscopy and combination cell proliferation and lineage markers, we found that the telencephalic ventricle wall (VW) at OB level of Austrolebias charrua fish presents three neurogenic niches (transitional 1, medial 2 and ventral 3)...
November 12, 2016: Neuroscience
Dora M Berman
Nonhuman primates (NHP) constitute a highly relevant pre-clinical animal model to develop strategies for beta cell replacement. The close phylogenetic and immunologic relationship between NHP and humans results in cross-reactivity of various biological agents with NHP cells, as well as a very similar cytoarchitecture between islets from human and NHP that is strikingly different from that observed in rodent islets. The composition and location of endocrine cells in human or NHP islets, randomly distributed and associated with blood vessels, have functional consequences and a predisposition for paracrine interactions...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Paola Caporali, Francesco Bruno, Giampiero Palladino, Jessica Dragotto, Laura Petrosini, Franco Mangia, Robert P Erickson, Sonia Canterini, Maria Teresa Fiorenza
Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective intracellular trafficking of exogenous cholesterol. Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration is the main sign of cerebellar dysfunction in both NPC1 patients and animal models. It has been recently shown that a significant decrease in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression reduces the proliferative potential of granule neuron precursors in the developing cerebellum of Npc1 (-/-) mice. Pursuing the hypothesis that this developmental defect translates into functional impairments, we have assayed Npc1-deficient pups belonging to the milder mutant mouse strain Npc1 (nmf164) for sensorimotor development from postnatal day (PN) 3 to PN21...
2016: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
Yoichiro Tamori, Emiko Suzuki, Wu-Min Deng
Malignant tumors are caused by uncontrolled proliferation of transformed mutant cells that have lost the ability to maintain tissue integrity. Although a number of causative genetic backgrounds for tumor development have been discovered, the initial steps mutant cells take to escape tissue integrity and trigger tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we show through analysis of conserved neoplastic tumor-suppressor genes (nTSGs) in Drosophila wing imaginal disc epithelia that tumor initiation depends on tissue-intrinsic local cytoarchitectures, causing tumors to consistently originate in a specific region of the tissue...
September 2016: PLoS Biology
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