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Complement and hemolytic anemia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913484/cold-agglutinin-disease
#1
Sigbjørn Berentsen
Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-defined clinicopathologic entity in which a specific, clonal lymphoproliferative B-cell bone marrow disorder results in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The immune hemolysis is entirely complement-dependent, predominantly mediated by activation of the classical pathway and phagocytosis of erythrocytes opsonized with complement protein C3b. Typical clinical features in CAD have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Pharmacologic treatment should be offered to patients with symptom-producing anemia or disabling circulatory symptoms...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913482/update-on-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria
#2
Charles J Parker
Once suspected, the diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is straightforward when flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood reveals a population of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor protein-deficient cells. But PNH is clinically heterogeneous, with some patients having a disease process characterized by florid intravascular, complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas in others, bone marrow failure dominates the clinical picture with modest or even no evidence of hemolysis observed. The clinical heterogeneity is due to the close, though incompletely understood, relationship between PNH and immune-mediated bone marrow failure, and that PNH is an acquired, nonmalignant clonal disease of the hematopoietic stem cells...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904864/nephrotic-range-proteinuria-and-peripheral-edema-in-a-child-not-only-idiopathic-nephrotic-syndrome
#3
Valentina Dolcemascolo, Marina Vivarelli, Manuela Colucci, Francesca Diomedi-Camassei, Rossella Piras, Marta Alberti, Francesco Emma
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the simultaneous occurrence of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury due to thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) mainly occurring in renal and cerebral microvessels. Although the most common cause of HUS in children is Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, atypical forms in which Shiga toxin is not the trigger may occur. Research over the last few years has shown that complement dysregulation secondary to mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the regulation of the alternative pathway of complement account for most forms of atypical HUS (aHUS)...
September 2016: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27812245/paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria-from-bench-to-bed
#4
REVIEW
Amrallah A Mohammed, Hani El-Tanni, Tariq Al-Malki Atiah, Arwa Al-Malki Atiah, Marwan Al-Malki Atiah, Ayman A Rasmy
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical symptoms making the diagnosis and prediction of its outcome difficult. It is caused by the expansion of a hematopoietic progenitor cell that has acquired a mutation in the X-linked phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) gene that results in deficiency of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor structure responsible for fixing a wide spectrum of proteins particularly CD55 and CD59. The clinical features of this disease arise as a result of complement-mediated hemolysis in unprotected red cells, leukocytes, and platelets as well as the release of free hemoglobin...
December 2016: Indian Journal of Hematology & Blood Transfusion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27787280/acute-kidney-injury-in-a-patient-with-hemolytic-anemia-and-thrombocytopenia
#5
Michael Breunig, Miguel Lalama, Gabrielle Rivard, Deanne Kashiwagi, Lynn Cornell
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is clinically difficult to distinguish from HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Atypical HUS results from dysregulation of complement activation causing thrombotic microangiopathy affecting multiple organ systems. Atypical HUS is associated with high morbidity and mortality, making early recognition and appropriate therapy necessary to improve patient outcomes.
November 2016: JAAPA: Official Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27781079/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-secondary-to-lupus-nephritis-responsive-to-eculizumab
#6
Alexander G Raufi, Shruti Scott, Omar Darwish, Kevin Harley, Kanwarpal Kahlon, Sheetal Desai, Yuxin Lu, Minh-Ha Tran
Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) - a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage...
September 28, 2016: Hematology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27768015/hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-children
#7
Valentina Talarico, Monica Aloe, Alice Monzani, Roberto Miniero, Gianni Bona
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy defined by thrombocytopenia, non-immune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure. HUS is typically classified into two primary types: 1) HUS due to infections, often associated with diarrhea (D+HUS, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia Coli-HUS), with the rare exception of HUS due to a severe disseminated infection caused by Streptococcus; 2) HUS related to complement, such HUS is also known as "atypical HUS" and is not diarrhea associated (D-HUS, aHUS); but recent studies have shown other forms of HUS, that can occur in the course of systemic diseases or physiopathological conditions such as pregnancy, after transplantation or after drug assumption...
December 2016: Minerva Pediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27766045/clinical-evaluation-of-thrombotic-microangiopathy-identification-of-patients-with-suspected-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#8
Yu-Min Shen
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defective complement regulation resulting in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Patients can present as children or adults. The syndrome consists of hemolytic anemia with schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia, significant renal damage, and/or other organ system dysfunction(s). Patients with aHUS may succumb to the complications of the disease with the very first manifestation; surviving patients often suffer from progressive organ dysfunction with significant morbidity and mortality despite plasma infusion or plasma exchange...
2016: Thrombosis Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27725586/pathogenesis-of-paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria
#9
Yoshiko Murakami
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired GPI deficiency caused by somatic mutation of the PIGA gene in one or several hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, PNH caused by somatic mutation of one allele of the PIGT gene in combination with a germline mutation of the other allele was reported, showing that PIGA is not the only gene responsible for PNH, though other causes are rare. These mutant cells become GPI deficient, expand clonally and differentiate into all of the hematopoietic lineages. When GPI deficient erythrocytes increase in proportion, massive hemolysis occurs due to activated complement attack during infection...
2016: [Rinshō Ketsueki] the Japanese Journal of Clinical Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27716293/combined-integrated-protocol-basket-trial-design-for-a-first-in-human-trial
#10
Ulla Derhaschnig, Jim Gilbert, Ulrich Jäger, Georg Böhmig, Georg Stingl, Bernd Jilma
BACKGROUND: Innovative trial designs are sought to streamline drug development in rare diseases. Basket- and integrated protocol designs are two of these new strategies and have been applied in a handful oncologic trials. We have taken the concept outside the realm of oncology and report about a first-in-human integrated protocol design that facilitates the transition from phase Ia in healthy volunteers to phase Ib in patients with rare complement-mediated disorders driven by the classical pathway...
October 4, 2016: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27644115/extravascular-hemolysis-and-complement-consumption-in-paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria-patients-undergoing-eculizumab-treatment
#11
Marta Subías Hidalgo, Hector Martin Merinero, Alicia López, Jaouad Anter, Sheila Pinto García, Fernando Ataúlfo Gonzalez-Fernández, Rafael Forés, Margarita Lopez-Trascasa, Ana Villegas, Emilio Ojeda, Santiago Rodríguez de Córdoba
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hemolytic anemia characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis that is effectively treated with eculizumab. However, treatment responses are reported heterogeneous with some patients presenting residual hemolysis and requiring RBC transfusions. Recent reports have shown that both extravascular hemolysis and incomplete C5 blockade can explain these suboptimal hematological responses. Here we have tested our eculizumab-treated PNH patients (n=12) for signs of hemolysis and assessed complement biomarkers...
September 13, 2016: Immunobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27561786/irregular-antibodies-in-no-hemolytic-autoimmune-diseases-are-able-to-induce-erythrophagocytosis
#12
Paola Ester López-Díaz, María Del Rocío Ruiz-Olivera, Luis Alberto Hernández-Osorio, Jaime Vargas-Arzola, Xareni Valle-Jiménez, Sergio Roberto Aguilar-Ruiz, Honorio Torres-Aguilar
Irregular antibodies are produced by alloimmunization because of pregnancies or blood transfusions. They are called "irregular" due to target erythrocyte antigens from "rare blood systems," those different from the ABO system. Irregular antibodies have been widely investigated in immunohematology since their presence in blood donors may lead to difficulties in blood typing and in blood cross-matching, or to induce hemolytic transfusion reactions. Nevertheless, their incidence and participation in the physiopathology of autoimmune diseases have not been thoroughly studied...
August 25, 2016: Immunologic Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27556240/use-of-eculizumab-in-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-complicating-systemic-lupus-erythematosus
#13
Rene S Bermea, Niharika Sharma, Kenneth Cohen, Vladimir M Liarski
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by the presence of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and end-organ injury. In this report, we describe two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with findings compatible with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, complicated by acute kidney injury that was refractory to conventional therapies. Both patients exhibited a response to eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement protein C5, with stabilization of their platelet count...
September 2016: Journal of Clinical Rheumatology: Practical Reports on Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27550478/clinical-practice-guidelines-for-the-management-of-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-korea
#14
REVIEW
Hae Il Cheong, Sang Kyung Jo, Sung Soo Yoon, Heeyeon Cho, Jin Seok Kim, Young Ok Kim, Ja Ryong Koo, Yong Park, Young Seo Park, Jae Il Shin, Kee Hwan Yoo, Doyeun Oh
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare syndrome characterized by micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. The major pathogenesis of aHUS involves dysregulation of the complement system. Eculizumab, which blocks complement C5 activation, has recently been proven as an effective agent. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of aHUS can cause death or end-stage renal disease. Therefore, a diagnosis that differentiates aHUS from other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy is very important for appropriate management...
October 2016: Journal of Korean Medical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497856/thrombotic-microangiopathy-care-pathway-a-consensus-statement-for-the-mayo-clinic-complement-alternative-pathway-thrombotic-microangiopathy-cap-tma-disease-oriented-group
#15
Ronald S Go, Jeffrey L Winters, Nelson Leung, David L Murray, Maria A Willrich, Roshini S Abraham, Hatem Amer, William J Hogan, Ariela L Marshall, Sanjeev Sethi, Cheryl L Tran, Dong Chen, Rajiv K Pruthi, Aneel A Ashrani, Fernando C Fervenza, Carl H Cramer, Vilmarie Rodriguez, Alexandra P Wolanskyj, Stephan D Thomé, C Christopher Hook
Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) comprise a heterogeneous set of conditions linked by a common histopathologic finding of endothelial damage resulting in microvascular thromboses and potentially serious complications. The typical clinical presentation is microangiopathic hemolytic anemia accompanied by thrombocytopenia with varying degrees of organ ischemia. The differential diagnoses are generally broad, while the workup is frequently complex and can be confusing. This statement represents the joint recommendations from a multidisciplinary team of Mayo Clinic physicians specializing in the management of TMA...
September 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27465155/generation-of-induced-pluripotent-stem-cells-as-a-potential-source-of-hematopoietic-stem-cells-for-transplant-in-pnh-patients
#16
Tanapol Phondeechareon, Methichit Wattanapanitch, Yaowalak U-Pratya, Chanapa Damkham, Nuttha Klincumhom, Chanchao Lorthongpanich, Pakpoom Kheolamai, Chuti Laowtammathron, Surapol Issaragrisil
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hemolytic anemia caused by lack of CD55 and CD59 on blood cell membrane leading to increased sensitivity of blood cells to complement. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative therapy for PNH, however, lack of HLA-matched donors and post-transplant complications are major concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients are an attractive source for generating autologous HSCs to avoid adverse effects resulting from allogeneic HSCT...
October 2016: Annals of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27460033/c3-mesangial-proliferative-glomerulonephritis-initially-presenting-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-a-case-report
#17
Can Huzmeli, Ferhan Candan, Ayse Seker, Esin Yildiz, Hatice Terzi, Mansur Kayatas
BACKGROUND: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and Coombs-negative hemolytic anemia. In C3 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, an increase in mesangial cell proliferation without thickening in the glomerular capillary wall can be seen under light microscopy, but the definitive diagnosis is made with the immunohistologic demonstration of isolated C3 deposits in the mesangium. C3 glomerulonephritis may be detected in childhood; however, in this case report we describe the first case of isolated C3 glomerulonephritis together with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in an adult patient...
2016: Journal of Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27408394/blood-group-discrepancy-first-sign-of-autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia-after-hematopoietic-stem-cell-transplantation-in-a-child
#18
Suvro Sankha Datta, Mahua Reddy, Sabita Basu, Shekhar Krishnan
A 12-year-old male child was presented in the emergency with features of anemia and mild icterus on day+67 of HSCT. The child was suffering from Fanconi anemia and undergone HSCT from ABO-matched, fully HLA matched sibling donor. The diagnosis of mixed type AIHA due to cytomegalovirus reactivation was made in the immunohematology laboratory and blood group discrepancy was the first sign of AIHA in this patient. Though the cold agglutinin titer was not significant but the clinical symptoms and laboratory evidences were suggestive of significant hemolysis due to underlying IgG autoantibody...
June 2016: Indian Journal of Hematology & Blood Transfusion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27408382/rare-occurrence-of-3-h-hypercalcemia-hemolytic-anemia-and-hodgkin-s-lymphoma
#19
Ankur Jain, Pankaj Malhotra, Gaurav Prakash, Subhash Varma, Narender Kumar, Asim Das
Clinicians in hematology practice commonly encounter anemia, hypercalcemia and renal failure, which when present in combination evoke a diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma. We report a 71-years old lady who presented to our hematology clinic with fever and easy fatiguability of 3 months duration and on investigations was found to have anemia and hypercalcemia. Direct Coomb's test characterized the anemia as complement mediated (anti-C3d) hemolysis. Biochemical investigations revealed normal 25(OH) Vitamin D3 and suppressed Parathormone levels and a negative workup for plasma cell dyscrasias, sarcoidosis and autoimmune disorders...
June 2016: Indian Journal of Hematology & Blood Transfusion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27378476/human-mannose-binding-lectin-inhibitor-prevents-shiga-toxin-induced-renal-injury
#20
Masayuki Ozaki, Yulin Kang, Ying Siow Tan, Vasile I Pavlov, Bohan Liu, Daniel C Boyle, Rafail I Kushak, Mikkel-Ole Skjoedt, Eric F Grabowski, Yasuhiko Taira, Gregory L Stahl
Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC HUS) is a worldwide endemic problem, and its pathophysiology is not fully elucidated. Here we tested whether the mannose-binding lectin (MBL2), an initiating factor of lectin complement pathway activation, plays a crucial role in STEC HUS. Using novel human MBL2-expressing mice (MBL2 KI) that lack murine Mbls (MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-)), a novel STEC HUS model consisted of an intraperitoneal injection with Shiga toxin-2 (Stx-2) with or without anti-MBL2 antibody (3F8, intraperitoneal)...
October 2016: Kidney International
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