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SSRI medication

Andrew F Leuchter, Aimee M Hunter, Felipe A Jain, Molly Tartter, Caroline Crump, Ian A Cook
Serotonin modulates brain oscillatory activity, and serotonergic projections to the thalamus and cortex modulate the frequency of prefrontal rhythmic oscillations. Changes in serotonergic tone have been reported to shift oscillations between the combined delta-theta (2.5-8 Hz) and the alpha (8-12 Hz) frequency ranges. Such frequency shifts may constitute a useful biomarker for the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). We utilized quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) to measure shifts in prefrontal rhythmic oscillations early in treatment with either the SSRI escitalopram or placebo, and examined the relationship between these changes and remission of depressive symptoms...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Itai Danovitch, Alexander Joseph Steiner, Anna Kazdan, Matthew Goldenberg, Margaret Haglund, James Mirocha, Katherine Collison, Brigitte Vanle, Jonathan Dang, Waguih William IsHak
OBJECTIVE: Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are common among persons with major depressive disorder (MDD) and have an adverse impact on course of illness and patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine whether AUD adversely impacted patient-centered outcomes in a sample of research subjects evaluated as part of a large clinical trial for depression. The outcomes of interest to this post hoc analysis are quality of life (QOL), functioning, and depressive symptom severity. METHODS: We analyzed 2280 adult MDD outpatient research subjects using data from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression trial...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Addiction Medicine
Kathrin Jobski, Niklas Schmedt, Bianca Kollhorst, Jutta Krappweis, Tania Schink, Edeltraut Garbe
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics, drug use patterns, and predictors for treatment choice in older German patients initiating antidepressant (AD) treatment. METHODS: Using the German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database, we identified a cohort of AD initiators aged at least 65 years between 2005 and 2011. Potential indications, co-morbidity, and co-medication as well as treatment patterns such as the duration of the first treatment episode were assessed...
October 18, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Hans M Nordahl, Patrick A Vogel, Gunnar Morken, Tore C Stiles, Pål Sandvik, Adrian Wells
BACKGROUND: The most efficacious treatments for social anxiety disorder (SAD) are the SSRIs and cognitive therapy (CT). Combined treatment is advocated for SAD but has not been evaluated in randomized trials using CT and SSRI. Our aim was to evaluate whether one treatment is more effective than the other and whether combined treatment is more effective than the single treatments. METHODS: A total of 102 patients were randomly assigned to paroxetine, CT, the combination of CT and paroxetine, or pill placebo...
October 15, 2016: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Kathryn Bennett, Katharina Manassis, Stephanie Duda, Alexa Bagnell, Gail A Bernstein, E Jane Garland, Lynn D Miller, Amanda Newton, Lehana Thabane, Pamela Wilansky
We conducted an overview of systematic reviews about child and adolescent anxiety treatment options (psychosocial; medication; combination; web/computer-based treatment) to support evidence informed decision-making. Three questions were addressed: (i) Is the treatment more effective than passive controls? (ii) Is there evidence that the treatment is superior to or non-inferior to (i.e., as good as) active controls? (iii) What is the quality of evidence for the treatment? Pre-specified inclusion criteria identified high quality systematic reviews (2000-2015) reporting treatment effects on anxiety diagnosis and symptom severity...
September 21, 2016: Clinical Psychology Review
Patricia Pilkinton, Carlos Berry, Seth Norrholm, Al Bartolucci, Badari Birur, Lori L Davis
OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remain the first-line treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, adjunctive atypical antipsychotics are often used to target residual or refractory symptoms. Asenapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic that possesses a high serotonin (5-HT2A) to dopamine (D2) affinity ratio and alpha-adrenergic antagonism, which may be advantageous in treating PTSD. This pilot study aimed to identify the therapeutic potential of asenapine as an adjunctive treatment for PTSD...
August 15, 2016: Psychopharmacology Bulletin
Kimberly Rose P Singian, Morgan Price, Vicky Bungay, Sabrina T Wong
BACKGROUND: Parkinson disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, and a comorbidity of depression is common. We aimed to describe demographic and health characteristics of patients with Parkinson disease and examine sex differences in antidepressant prescriptions for those with comorbid depression using electronic medical records. METHODS: We analyzed Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network data for patients 18 years and older with a diagnosis of Parkinson disease who had at least 1 primary care encounter between Sep...
July 2016: CMAJ Open
Artur Pałasz, Aleksandra Suszka-Świtek, Łukasz Filipczyk, Katarzyna Bogus, Ewa Rojczyk, John Worthington, Marek Krzystanek, Ryszard Wiaderkiewicz
BACKGROUND: Spexin (SPX) is a recently discovered neuropeptide that exhibits a large spectrum of central and peripheral regulatory activity, especially when considered as a potent anorexigenic factor. It has already been proven that antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), can modulate peptidergic signaling in various brain structures. Despite these findings, there is so far no information regarding the influence of treatment with the SSRI antidepressant escitalopram on brain SPX expression...
September 3, 2016: Pharmacological Reports: PR
Kazuhiko Yamamuro, Toyosaku Ota, Junzo Iida, Naoko Kishimoto, Yoko Nakanishi, Toshifumi Kishimoto
AIMS: Increasing clinical evidence points to impulsivity as a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, little is known about its persistence over time. METHODS: In this study, we evaluated the performance of 12 pediatric patients with OCD on the Stroop color-word task, which assesses impulsivity and compared this with age- and sex-matched controls. In parallel, we measured changes in hemodynamic responses during the task, using near-infrared spectroscopy...
October 4, 2016: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Y Cheng, J Xu, D Arnone, B Nie, H Yu, H Jiang, Y Bai, C Luo, R A A Campbell, B Shan, L Xu, X Xu
BACKGROUND: The present study investigated alteration of brain resting-state activity induced by antidepressant treatment and attempted to investigate whether treatment efficacy can be predicted at an early stage of pharmacological treatment. METHOD: Forty-eight first-episode medication-free patients diagnosed with major depression received treatment with escitalopram. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was administered prior to treatment, 5 h after the first dose, during the course of pharmacological treatment (week 4) and at endpoint (week 8)...
October 4, 2016: Psychological Medicine
Karim Malki, Maria Grazia Tosto, Héctor Mouriño-Talín, Sabela Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Oliver Pain, Irfan Jumhaboy, Tina Liu, Panos Parpas, Stuart Newman, Artem Malykh, Lucia Carboni, Rudolf Uher, Peter McGuffin, Leonard C Schalkwyk, Kevin Bryson, Mark Herbster
Response to antidepressant (AD) treatment may be a more polygenic trait than previously hypothesized, with many genetic variants interacting in yet unclear ways. In this study we used methods that can automatically learn to detect patterns of statistical regularity from a sparsely distributed signal across hippocampal transcriptome measurements in a large-scale animal pharmacogenomic study to uncover genomic variations associated with AD. The study used four inbred mouse strains of both sexes, two drug treatments, and a control group (escitalopram, nortriptyline, and saline)...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Shelly L Gray, Joseph T Hanlon
Use of medications with anticholinergic activity is widespread in older adults. Several studies have highlighted that anticholinergic use may be associated with an increased risk of dementia. The objective of this narrative review is to describe and evaluate studies of anticholinergic medication use and dementia and provide practical suggestions for avoiding use of these medications in older adults. A comprehensive review of the literature, citations from recent reviews and the author's personal files was conducted...
October 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety
Steven P Roose, Bret R Rutherford
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to review the data on the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on bleeding during or after operative procedures and to offer guidelines for clinical management. DATA SOURCES: Search of PubMed and MEDLINE for all articles in English from 1990-2016 with key words depression, antidepressants, bleeding, platelets, and operation. STUDY SELECTION: Studies were included if they reported information on bleeding complications during operative or childbirth procedures in patients taking antidepressants...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
Valory DeLucia, Gary Kelsberg, Sarah Safranek
We don't know which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most effective and safe because no studies have compared these antidepressants with each other. Three SSRI antidepressant medications--fluoxetine, sertraline, and escitalopram--produce modest improvements (about 5% to 10%) in standardized depression scores without a significant increase in the risk of suicide-related outcomes (suicidal behavior or ideation) in adolescent patients with major depression of moderate severity.
September 2016: Journal of Family Practice
Jeanne Lackamp, Rebecca Schlachet, Martha Sajatovic
BACKGROUND: Major depression disorder (MDD) is one of the most common mental disorders world-wide and is prevalent throughout the lifespan, with prevalence estimates of 1-5% in those 65 years of age and older. METHODS: The aim of this mini-review is to briefly summarize clinically relevant topics within the domain of later-life MDD. RESULTS: The mini-review presents an overview of epidemiology, complications of late life MDD, risk factors and clinical presentation, clinical assessment, general issues relevant to the treatment of the older adult with MDD, drug treatments, discussion of how medical complexity affects drug treatment and other treatment modalities...
September 2016: Psychiatria Danubina
Du Geon Moon
Management of premature ejaculation (PE) has evolved tremandoulsy over the last 20 years. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and local anesthetics are the most and best studied treatments. This evidence has led to the establishment of an evidence-based definition of PE and the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of PE. The current treatment of choice for PE according to the ISSM guidelines is a centrally acting SSRI or peripherally acting topical anesthetics...
August 2016: Translational Andrology and Urology
Chris G McMahon
Over the past 20-30 years, the premature ejaculation (PE) treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Pharmacotherapy for PE predominantly targets the multiple neurotransmitters and receptors involved in the control of ejaculation which include serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin, norepinephrine, gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) and nitric oxide (NO). The objective of this article is to review emerging PE interventions contemporary data on the treatment of PE was reviewed and critiqued using the principles of evidence-based medicine...
August 2016: Translational Andrology and Urology
Claire A M Zar-Kessler, Jaime Belkind-Gerson, Suzanne Bender, Braden M Kuo
OBJECTIVES: Pediatric functional abdominal pain is often treated with tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). The aim is investigating antidepressant use for treatment efficacy, correlation of response to psychiatric factors and impact of side effects in regard to physicians' prescribing patterns. METHODS: Retrospective review (2005-2013) children (5-21yo) with functional abdominal pain treated with SSRI or TCA. Of the 531 cases with functional abdominal pain, 192 initiated SSRIs or TCAs while followed by gastroenterology...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Che-Sheng Chu, Po-Han Chou, Ching-Heng Lin, Chin Cheng, Chia-Jui Tsai, Tsuo-Hung Lan, Min-Wei Huang, Gerald Nestadt
BACKGROUND: Previous research has suggested a link between antidepressants use and the development of cerebrovascular events, but there has never been any study investigating the risk of stroke in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients treated with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted using data from the National Health Insurance Database of Taiwan between the year of 2001 and 2009...
2016: PloS One
Carol A Shively, Marnie Silverstein-Metzler, Jamie Justice, Stephanie L Willard
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is ubiquitous because they are widely prescribed for a number of disorders in addition to depression. Depression increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hence, treating depression with SSRIs could reduce CHD risk. However, the effects of long term antidepressant treatment on CHD risk, as well as other aspects of health, remain poorly understood. Thus, we undertook an investigation of multisystem effects of SSRI treatment with a physiologically relevant dose in middle-aged adult female cynomolgus monkeys, a primate species shown to be a useful model of both depression and coronary and carotid artery atherosclerosis...
August 30, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
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