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Social determinants indigenous health

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29883437/under-the-same-sky-connecting-students-and-cultures-through-circumpolar-nursing-education
#1
Bente Norbye, Lorna Butler, Heather Exner-Pirot
The recruitment and retention of health professionals in rural, remote, and northern regions is an ongoing challenge. The Northern Nursing Education Network brought together nursing students working in rural and remote regions of the circumpolar north in Innovative Learning Institute on Circumpolar Health (ILICH) events to create opportunities for shared learning and expose both students and faculty to local and traditional knowledge that informs health behaviors specific to regions with Indigenous populations...
May 21, 2018: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29795554/who-is-research-serving-a-systematic-realist-review-of-circumpolar-environment-related-indigenous-health-literature
#2
Jen Jones, Ashlee Cunsolo, Sherilee L Harper
BACKGROUND: Addressing factors leading to health disparities in the Circumpolar North require approaches that consider and address the social determinants of health including on-going colonization. Today, colonization and related policies and processes, continue to manifest in the marginalization of Indigenous knowledge, particularly its use in research; however, Indigenous populations have moved from being research subjects to leaders and consumers of environmental health research. Given the tensions that exist between how health research is conducted, how the results are mobilized, and who has control and access to the results, we examine how peer-reviewed environment-related Indigenous health research in the Circumpolar North is serving the needs of Indigenous communities, governments, and organizations...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29770077/outbreaks-in-the-age-of-syndemics-new-insights-for-improving-indigenous-health
#3
A Andermann
Conventional approaches for the prevention and control of communicable diseases within Indigenous contexts may benefit from new insights arising from the growing interest in syndemics. Syndemics is a term used to describe a conceptual framework for understanding diseases or health conditions, and how these are exacerbated by the social, economic, environmental and political milieu in which a population is immersed. The use of conventional approaches for outbreak prevention and control remains the bedrock of intervention in the field of communicable diseases; yet on their own, these strategies are not always successful, especially within contexts of marginalization and disadvantage...
June 1, 2017: Canada Communicable Disease Report, Relevé des Maladies Transmissibles Au Canada
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672684/social-media-and-health-information-sharing-among-australian-indigenous-people
#4
Marita Hefler, Vicki Kerrigan, Joanna Henryks, Becky Freeman, David P Thomas
Despite the enormous potential of social media for health promotion, there is an inadequate evidence base for how they can be used effectively to influence behaviour. In Australia, research suggests social media use is higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than the general Australian population; however, health promoters need a better understanding of who uses technologies, how and why. This qualitative study investigates what types of health content are being shared among Aboriginal and Torres Strait people through social media networks, as well as how people engage with, and are influenced by, health-related information in their offline life...
April 17, 2018: Health Promotion International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29666024/social-determinants-of-self-reported-health-for-canada-s-indigenous-peoples-a-public-health-approach
#5
R Bethune, N Absher, M Obiagwu, T Qarmout, M Steeves, M Yaghoubi, R Tikoo, M Szafron, C Dell, M Farag
OBJECTIVE: In Canada, indigenous peoples suffer from a multitude of health disparities. To better understand these disparities, this study aims to examine the social determinants of self-reported health for indigenous peoples in Canada. STUDY DESIGN: This study uses data from Statistics Canada's Aboriginal Peoples Survey 2012. METHODS: Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine how selected social determinants of health are associated with self-reported health among off-reserve First Nations and Métis peoples in Canada...
April 14, 2018: Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605053/a-contemporary-framework-of-health-equity-applied-to-gynecologic-cancer-care-a-society-of-gynecologic-oncology-evidenced-based-review
#6
REVIEW
Sarah M Temkin, B J Rimel, Amanda S Bruegl, Camille C Gunderson, Anna L Beavis, Kemi M Doll
Health disparities are defined as the preventable difference in the burden of disease, injury, and violence, or opportunity to achieve optimal health that socially disadvantaged populations experience compared to the population as a whole. Disparities in incidence and cancer outcomes for women with gynecologic malignancies have been well described particularly for American women of Black race. The etiology of these disparities has been tied to socio-economics, cultural, educational and genetic factors. While access to high quality treatment has been primarily linked to survival from cervical and ovarian cancer, innate biologic distinctions have been principally cited as reasons for differences in incidence and mortality in cancers of the uterine corpus...
April 2018: Gynecologic Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29575412/understanding-access-to-healthcare-among-indigenous-peoples-a-comparative-analysis-of-biomedical-and-postcolonial-perspectives
#7
Tara Horrill, Diana E McMillan, Annette S H Schultz, Genevieve Thompson
As nursing professionals, we believe access to healthcare is fundamental to health and that it is a determinant of health. Therefore, evidence suggesting access to healthcare is problematic for many Indigenous peoples is concerning. While biomedical perspectives underlie our current understanding of access, considering alternate perspectives could expand our awareness of and ability to address this issue. In this paper, we critique how access to healthcare is understood through a biomedical lens, how a postcolonial theoretical lens can extend that understanding, and the subsequent implications this alternative view raises for the nursing profession...
March 25, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554440/reducing-indigenous-oral-health-inequalities-a-review-from-5-nations
#8
T Tiwari, L Jamieson, J Broughton, H P Lawrence, T S Batliner, R Arantes, J Albino
Indigenous populations around the world experience a disproportionate burden in terms of oral diseases and conditions. These inequalities are likely due to a complex web of social determinants that includes poverty, historical consequences of colonialism, social exclusion, government policies of assimilation, cultural annihilation, and racism in all its forms (societal, institutional). Despite documented oral health disparities, prevention interventions have been scarce in Indigenous communities. This review describes oral health interventions and their outcomes conducted for Indigenous populations of the United States, Canada, Brazil, Australia, and New Zealand...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Dental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29513022/recent-developments-in-suicide-prevention-among-the-indigenous-peoples-of-australia
#9
Pat Dudgeon, Christopher Holland
OBJECTIVES: Suicide is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter 'Indigenous') population health issue. Over 2015-2016, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Project (ATSISPEP) aimed to identify success factors in Indigenous suicide prevention. CONCLUSIONS: For non-Indigenous practitioners working with indigenous clients at risk of suicide, ATSISPEP identified important considerations to make treatment more effective. The start is acknowledging the differences in the historical, cultural, political, social and economic experiences of Indigenous peoples, and their greater exposure to trauma, psychological distress and risks to mental health...
April 2018: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29483027/canada-s-universal-health-care-system-achieving-its-potential
#10
REVIEW
Danielle Martin, Ashley P Miller, Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, Nadine R Caron, Bilkis Vissandjée, Gregory P Marchildon
Access to health care based on need rather than ability to pay was the founding principle of the Canadian health-care system. Medicare was born in one province in 1947. It spread across the country through federal cost sharing, and eventually was harmonised through standards in a federal law, the Canada Health Act of 1984. The health-care system is less a true national system than a decentralised collection of provincial and territorial insurance plans covering a narrow basket of services, which are free at the point of care...
April 28, 2018: Lancet
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432332/impacts-of-educating-for-equity-workshop-on-addressing-social-barriers-of-type-2-diabetes-with-indigenous-patients
#11
Lynden Lindsay Crowshoe, Han Han, Betty Calam, Rita Henderson, Kristen Jacklin, Leah Walker, Michael E Green
INTRODUCTION: Health education about Indigenous populations in Canada (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people) is one approach to enable health services to mitigate health disparities faced by Indigenous peoples related to a history of colonization and ongoing social inequities. This evaluation of a continuing medical education workshop, to enhance family physicians' clinical approach by including social and cultural dimensions within diabetes management, was conducted to determine whether participation in the workshop improved self-reported knowledge, skills, and confidence in working with Indigenous patients with type 2 diabetes...
January 2018: Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29426597/determinants-of-tuberculosis-trends-in-six-indigenous-populations-of-the-usa-canada-and-greenland-from-1960-to-2014-a-population-based-study
#12
Kianoush Dehghani, Zhiyi Lan, Peizhi Li, Sascha Wilk Michelsen, Sean Waites, Andrea Benedetti, Pierre Lejeune, Jill Torrie, Elizabeth Robinson, Berenica Vejvoda, Muhammad Mullah, Diana Redwood, Michael Cooper, Anne Fanning, Wadieh Yacoub, Gonzalo G Alvarez, Bolette Søborg, Richard Long, Dick Menzies
BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis continues to disproportionately affect many Indigenous populations in the USA, Canada, and Greenland. We aimed to investigate whether population-based tuberculosis-specific interventions or changes in general health and socioeconomic indicators, or a combination of these factors, were associated with changes in tuberculosis incidence in these Indigenous populations. METHODS: For this population-based study we examined annual tuberculosis notification rates between 1960 and 2014 in six Indigenous populations of the USA, Canada, and Greenland (Inuit [Greenland], American Indian and Alaska Native [Alaska, USA], First Nations [Alberta, Canada], Cree of Eeyou Istchee [Quebec, Canada], Inuit of Nunavik [Quebec, Canada], and Inuit of Nunavut [Canada]), as well as the general population of Canada...
March 2018: Lancet. Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29415024/identifying-evidence-practice-gaps-and-strategies-for-improvement-in-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-maternal-health-care
#13
Melanie E Gibson-Helm, Jodie Bailie, Veronica Matthews, Alison F Laycock, Jacqueline A Boyle, Ross S Bailie
INTRODUCTION: Adverse pregnancy outcomes are more common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations than non-Indigenous populations in Australia. Later in life, most of the difference in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and non-Indigenous women is due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women attend health services regularly during pregnancy. Providing high-quality care within these appointments has an important role to play in improving the current and future health of women and babies...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29384250/factors-relating-to-high-psychological-distress-in-indigenous-australians-and-their-contribution-to-indigenous-non-indigenous-disparities
#14
Bridgette J McNamara, Emily Banks, Lina Gubhaju, Grace Joshy, Anna Williamson, Beverley Raphael, Sandra Eades
OBJECTIVE: To explore factors associated with high psychological distress among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians and their contribution to the elevated distress prevalence among Aboriginal people. METHODS: Questionnaire data from 1,631 Aboriginal and 233,405 non-Aboriginal 45 and Up Study (NSW, Australia) participants aged ≥45 years were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for high psychological distress (Kessler-10 score ≥22) for socio-demographic, health and disability-related factors, and to quantify contributions to differences in distress prevalence...
April 2018: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29368657/characteristics-of-indigenous-primary-health-care-service-delivery-models-a-systematic-scoping-review
#15
REVIEW
Stephen G Harfield, Carol Davy, Alexa McArthur, Zachary Munn, Alex Brown, Ngiare Brown
BACKGROUND: Indigenous populations have poorer health outcomes compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. The evolution of Indigenous primary health care services arose from mainstream health services being unable to adequately meet the needs of Indigenous communities and Indigenous peoples often being excluded and marginalised from mainstream health services. Part of the solution has been to establish Indigenous specific primary health care services, for and managed by Indigenous peoples...
January 25, 2018: Globalization and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29359439/reclaiming-food-security-in-the-mohawk-community-of-kahnaw%C3%A3-ke-through-haudenosaunee-responsibilities
#16
Treena Delormier, Kahente Horn-Miller, Alex M McComber, Kaylia Marquis
Indigenous Peoples are reclaiming their food security, nutrition, and well-being by revitalizing food systems, livelihoods, knowledge-systems, and governance. Our food security research is guided by sustainable self-determination that focuses on restoring Indigenous cultural responsibilities and relationships to land, each other, and the natural world (Corntassel, 2008). Our Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) research team from Kahnawà:ke, in Quebec, Canada, examines food insecurity experiences in our community to explore ways of upholding our Haudenosaunee responsibilities and enhancing local food security...
November 2017: Maternal & Child Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29359433/indigenous-peoples-food-systems-nutrition-and-gender-conceptual-and-methodological-considerations
#17
Stefanie Lemke, Treena Delormier
Indigenous Peoples, especially women and children, are affected disproportionately by malnutrition and diet-related health problems. Addressing this requires an investigation of the structural conditions that underlie unequal access to resources and loss of traditional lifestyles and necessitates inclusive approaches that shed light onto these issues and provide strategies to leverage change. Indigenous Peoples' food systems are inextricably connected to land, which in turn is interwoven with issues of self-determination, livelihoods, health, cultural and spiritual heritage, and gender...
November 2017: Maternal & Child Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29340514/racial-i-nter-dentification-the-racialization-of-maternal-health-through-the-oportunidades-program-and-in-government-clinics-in-m%C3%A3-xico
#18
Rosalynn Adeline Vega
Using an ethnographic approach, this article examines the role of racialization in health-disease-care processes specifically within the realm of maternal health. It considers the experiences of health care administrators and providers, indigenous midwives and mothers, and recipients of conditional cash transfers through the Oportunidades program in Mexico. By detailing the delivery of trainings of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) [Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social] for indigenous midwives and Oportunidades workshops to indigenous stipend recipients, the article critiques the deployment of "interculturality" in ways that inadvertently re-inscribe inequality...
July 2017: Salud Colectiva
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29336232/wealth-social-protection-programs-and-child-labor-in-colombia-a-cross-sectional-study
#19
Ángela María Pinzón-Rondón, Liseth B Cifuentes, Catalina Zuluaga, Juan Carlos Botero, Mariana Pinzon-Caicedo
This article has 3 main objectives: (1) to assess the prevalence of child labor in Colombia, (2) to identify factors associated with child labor, and (3) to determine whether social protection programs have an association with the prevalence of child labor in the country. Using a cross-sectional study with data from the Colombian Demographic and Health Survey 2010, a working child was defined as a child who worked during the week prior to the survey in an activity other than household chores. Through descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, and multivariate regressions, it was found that child labor was associated with gender (boys were more likely to work), older age, ethnicity (children from indigenous communities were more likely to be workers), school dropout, disability (children with disabilities were less likely to be working), subsidized health social security system membership, and lower number of years of mother's schooling...
January 1, 2018: International Journal of Health Services: Planning, Administration, Evaluation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29236377/xpey-relational-environments-an-analytic-framework-for-conceptualizing-indigenous-health-equity
#20
Alexandra Kent, Charlotte Loppie, Jeannine Carriere, Marjorie MacDonald, Bernie Pauly
INTRODUCTION: Both health equity research and Indigenous health research are driven by the goal of promoting equitable health outcomes among marginalized and underserved populations. However, the two fields often operate independently, without collaboration. As a result, Indigenous populations are underrepresented in health equity research relative to the disproportionate burden of health inequities they experience. In this methodological article, we present Xpey' Relational Environments, an analytic framework that maps some of the barriers and facilitators to health equity for Indigenous peoples...
December 2017: Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada
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