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Deborah J Bird, William J Murphy, Lester Fox-Rosales, Iman Hamid, Robert A Eagle, Blaire Van Valkenburgh
The evolution of mammalian olfaction is manifested in a remarkable diversity of gene repertoires, neuroanatomy and skull morphology across living species. Olfactory receptor genes (ORGs), which initiate the conversion of odorant molecules into odour perceptions and help an animal resolve the olfactory world, range in number from a mere handful to several thousand genes across species. Within the snout, each of these ORGs is exclusively expressed by a discrete population of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), suggesting that newly evolved ORGs may be coupled with new OSN populations in the nasal epithelium...
March 14, 2018: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Jo Anne Au Yong, Daniel D Lewis, Scott B Citino, Mark W Cunningham, Alan R Cross, James P Farese, Luisito S Pablo
The clinical outcomes of six free-ranging Florida panthers ( Puma concolor coryi) that underwent surgical stabilization of appendicular long-bone fractures (three femoral fractures, one tibial and one tibial and fibular fracture and two radial and ulnar fractures) were evaluated. These panthers presented to the University of Florida from 2000-2014. Estimated age of the panthers ranged from 0.5 to 4.5 yr, and weights ranged from 22 to 65 kg. Causes of injuries were vehicular collision ( n = 4) and capture related ( n = 2)...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Muhammad A Saeed, Mohammed H Rashid, Jane Vaughan, Abdul Jabbar
Members of the genus Sarcocystis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) are intracellular protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of domestic and wild animals, resulting in economic losses in production animals worldwide. Sarcocystis spp. have indirect life-cycles where canids and felids serve as main definitive hosts while a range of domestic and wild animals serve as intermediate hosts, including South American camelids (SACs) such as alpacas, llamas and guanacos. These animals primarily occur in South American countries on Andean, elevated plains but in recent years, alpacas and llamas have become emerging animal industries in other parts of the world such as Australia, Europe and the USA due to their high-quality fiber, meat and hides...
March 6, 2018: Parasites & Vectors
Maira Aparecida Christello Trindade, Marcia Raquel Pegoraro de Macedo, Gertrud Muller
Parasitic diseases affecting wild carnivores remain largely unknown or poorly described. Dioctophymosis is a parasitosis caused by the nematode Dioctophyme renale that is found worldwide. It affects domestic and wild animals and has been reported frequently in Brazil. This paper reports dioctophymosis in a wild felid for the first time.
February 19, 2018: Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Parasitology
Adnan Hodžić, Amer Alić, Georg Gerhard Duscher
Wild felids may play a significant role in the transmission of various pathogens to domestic cats, in particular, but also to other animals and humans. However, since data on the occurrence of blood-borne organisms in European wild cats (Felis silvestris silvestris) are scarce, the present study aimed to provide an insight into the genetic diversity of the agents carried by this sylvatic species in Bosnia and Herzegovina and to elucidate their pathogenic impact. Tissue samples from 18 adult wild cats were collected and examined by PCR and histopathology...
February 1, 2018: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
G Steenkamp, S C Boy, P J van Staden, M N Bester
Descriptions of several oral, maxillofacial and dental conditions/diseases exist for a variety of captive large felids, but little is reported on the pathology of free roaming large felids. Apart from focal palatine erosions (FPEs) as initially described by Fitch and Fagan (1982) and some reference to absent incisor teeth, few data exist on diseases affecting the oral, maxillofacial and dental structures of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), regardless of their captivity status. This study reports 18 different conditions affecting the teeth, bone and oral cavity soft tissue of cheetahs, based on initial assessment of 256 animals over 11 years (2002-2012) in South Africa and Namibia...
January 2018: Journal of Comparative Pathology
Andreia F Silva, Sara Escada-Rebelo, Sandra Amaral, Renata S Tavares, Stefan Schlatt, João Ramalho-Santos, Paula C Mota
The reduced number of animals in most wild felid populations implies a loss of genetic diversity. The death of juveniles, prior to the production of mature sperm, represents a loss of potential genetic contribution to future populations. Since 2011 mouse testicular organ culture has introduced an alternative mechanism to produce sperm in vitro from immature tissue. However, extension of this technology to other species has remained limited. We have used the domestic cat (Felis catus) as a model for wild felids to investigate spermatogenesis initiation and regulation, with the mouse serving as a control species...
2018: PloS One
Mariana Malzoni Furtado, Sueli Akemi Taniwaki, Betina Metzger, Lucia Helena O'Dwyer, Karina Dos Santos Paduan, Anah Tereza de Almeida Jácomo, Grasiela Edith de Oliveira Porfírio, Leandro Silveira, Rahel Sollmann, Natália Mundim Tôrres, José Soares Ferreira Neto
Species of hemoplasmas have been described worldwide, but little information is available for wild felids. Between February 2000 and January 2010, blood samples were collected from 30 jaguars (Panthera onca) and 22 domestic cats (Felis catus) from the Cerrado, Pantanal and Amazon biomes of Brazil. In all samples molecular tests were performed for Mycoplasma haemofelis/Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhf/Mhc), 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' (CMt). Twenty-two (73.4%) jaguars and four domestic cats (18...
February 2018: Veterinary Microbiology
Hannah G Williams, Kirstin A Cook, Patricia E Lawler, Linda L Archer, Karen Schaedel, Natalie Isaza, James F X Wellehan
Astroviruses are viral pathogens that have been associated with enteric and neurologic disease in a variety of species. The domestic cat is a prominent host, with reports of astroviral infection being both highly prevalent and widely distributed in the feline population. Despite the potential for inducing significant disease, especially within shelter environments, there is currently only one reliable method of detection: standard reverse-transcription PCR using pan-astrovirus degenerate primers (consensus RT-PCR) with product sequencing...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Camille Grohé, Beatrice Lee, John J Flynn
The cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, is the fastest living land mammal. Because of its specialized hunting strategy, this species evolved a series of specialized morphological and functional body features to increase its exceptional predatory performance during high-speed hunting. Using high-resolution X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT), we provide the first analyses of the size and shape of the vestibular system of the inner ear in cats, an organ essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture and gaze direction during movement in most vertebrates...
February 2, 2018: Scientific Reports
L Mark Elbroch, Anna Kusler
Background: Interspecific competition affects species fitness, community assemblages and structure, and the geographic distributions of species. Established dominance hierarchies among species mitigate the need for fighting and contribute to the realized niche for subordinate species. This is especially important for apex predators, many of which simultaneous contend with the costs of competition with more dominant species and the costs associated with human hunting and lethal management...
2018: PeerJ
Aleksandra Penezić, Roberta Moriano, Marija Spasić, Duško Ćirović
Dirofilaria immitis causes a severe and life-threatening cardio-pulmonary disease in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas; also, zoonotic infections have been reported. This parasitic vector-borne disease is mostly common in domestic and wild canids and felids. Here, we present a rare finding of this roundworm in the heart of a Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra). Four mature specimens of D. immitis were found in the right ventricle of the heart. Necropsy was performed after the animal was found road-killed in Eastern Serbia, close to the Danube River...
January 26, 2018: Parasitology Research
Peter Stenvinkel, Johanna Painer, Makoto Kuro-O, Miguel Lanaspa, Walter Arnold, Thomas Ruf, Paul G Shiels, Richard J Johnson
Many of the >2 million animal species that inhabit Earth have developed survival mechanisms that aid in the prevention of obesity, kidney disease, starvation, dehydration and vascular ageing; however, some animals remain susceptible to these complications. Domestic and captive wild felids, for example, show susceptibility to chronic kidney disease (CKD), potentially linked to the high protein intake of these animals. By contrast, naked mole rats are a model of longevity and are protected from extreme environmental conditions through mechanisms that provide resistance to oxidative stress...
January 15, 2018: Nature Reviews. Nephrology
Miriam M Morales, S Rocío Moyano, Agustina M Ortiz, Marcos D Ercoli, Luis I Aguado, Sergio A Cardozo, Norberto P Giannini
Leopardus wiedii (margay) is the only arboreal Neotropical felid able to climb head-first down trees, due to its ability to rotate its tarsal joint 180°. A closely related, similar-sized species, L. geoffroyi (Geoffroy's cat) exhibits more typical terrestrial habits and lacks the arboreal capabilities of L. wiedii. There is osteological evidence that supports a mechanical specialization of L. wiedii's tarsal joint for inversion, but there have been no studies on the myology of this specialization. Based on comparative gross-anatomy dissections of zeugo- and autopodial muscles related to the ankle joint of one margay specimen and two Geoffroýs cats, we identified myological specializations of L...
December 26, 2017: Zoology: Analysis of Complex Systems, ZACS
Xi Zhang, Ya Li Shi, Lu Lu Han, Chen Xiong, Shi Qi Yi, Peng Jiang, Zeng Xian Wang, Ji Long Shen, Jing Cui, Zhong Quan Wang
BACKGROUND: Thelazia callipaeda is the causative agent of thelaziasis in canids, felids and humans. However, the population genetic structure regarding this parasite remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we first explored the genetic variation of 32 T. callipaeda clinical isolates using the following multi-molecular markers: cox1, cytb, 12S rDNA, ITS1 and 18S rDNA. The isolates were collected from 13 patients from 11 geographical locations in China...
January 11, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Gennaro Altamura, Claudia Eleni, Roberta Meoli, Giusy Cardeti, Klaus Günther Friedrich, Giuseppe Borzacchiello
Oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common finding in domestic and wild felids. Only two cases of oral SCC have been reported in Lynx species (Lynx rufus and Lynx canadensis), at mandibular and gingival sites. In this study, we describe the first report of tongue SCC in a 15 years old female European lynx (Lynx lynx), along with viral investigations. Necropsy and histological analysis were performed and the presence of papillomavirus (PV) infection was investigated by ultrastructural and molecular methods...
January 2, 2018: Veterinary Sciences
Sarah A Cannizzo, Mindy Stinner, Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf
Cystinuria is a condition caused by defects in amino acid transport within the kidneys and small intestines. It has been reported in humans, dogs, domestic cats, ferrets, nondomestic canids, and nondomestic felids, including servals ( Leptailurus serval). Genetic mutations have been identified in dogs, humans, and domestic cats. Cystinuria usually follows an autosomal recessive inheritance, although it can be autosomal dominant and sex linked. The primary objective of this study was to screen urine samples dried on filter paper from captive servals in the United States for cystinuria by using the cyanide-nitroprusside screening test...
December 2017: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Ampika Thongphakdee, Wanlaya Tipkantha, Chainarong Punkong, Kaywalee Chatdarong
In the past decade, studies on reproductive biology, endocrinology, and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) in the domestic cat have contributed to a lot of progress in conservation breeding of wild felids. However, the 36 species of the Felidae family have species- and individual-specific reproductive cycles and respond differently to exogenous hormones. Monitoring the ovarian cycle of wild felids can improve their natural breeding and maximize their reproductive success. Moreover, fundamental knowledge on the hormonal patterns of each feline species offers the opportunity to develop ARTs, particularly in threatened and endangered species...
December 11, 2017: Theriogenology
Janine L Brown
The ability to track gonadal function is facilitated by the use of endocrine and ultrasound techniques, both of which are important tools for optimizing reproduction and ensuring sustainability of fragile populations. With so many species now endangered, captive breeding is increasingly viewed as a means to sustain important insurance populations. As reproduction is key to species survival, understanding how to control and monitor ovarian function is vital. Through decades of study, we now have a greater understanding of the diversity, and plasticity, of reproductive mechanisms across taxa...
December 8, 2017: Theriogenology
Georgiana Deak, Angela Monica Ionică, Andrei Daniel Mihalca, Călin Mircea Gherman
BACKGROUND: The genus Troglostrongylus includes nematodes infecting domestic and wild felids. Troglostrongylus brevior was described six decades ago in Palestine and subsequently reported in some European countries (Italy, Spain, Greece, Bulgaria, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). As the diagnosis by the first-stage larvae (L1) may be challenging, there is a possibility of confusion with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Hence, the knowledge on the distribution of this neglected feline parasite is still scarce...
December 6, 2017: Parasites & Vectors
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