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Professional identity development

Mirja Ruohoniemi, Johanna Mikkonen, Riitta Salomäki, Laura Hänninen, Annamari Heikkilä, Sanna Ryhänen
During the last decade, concerns over veterinary students' stress have been expressed in several studies, and the need for student support has become evident. In addition, the importance of professional and personal identity development in veterinary curricula has been widely recognized. There is a need to integrate academic and professional skills instruction with training in personal-life balance. Even though tools for student support and stress management exist within universities, reports on active and creative practices in veterinary education are scarce...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
J Brindley
Aim The focus of this review was to identify the role of reflection in continuing dental education. By understanding the expectations that our statutory regulative authority has of their registrants there is an opportunity to help to shape the continued professional development activities undertaken by current registrants in the future.Objective Conduct a review of General Dental Council (GDC) Fitness to Practise cases which were given conditions (restrictions) between February 2012 and November 2015, identifying relevant emergent outcomes in relation the Fitness to Practise (FTP) process...
October 21, 2016: British Dental Journal
Sarah Mahoney, Ruth M Sladek, Tim Neild
BACKGROUND: Although appropriate empathy in health professionals is essential, a loss of empathy can occur during medical education. The structure of clinical learning may be one factor that is implicated in a loss of empathy. This study examines student and doctor empathy, and possible associations between empathy and the structure of clinical learning. METHODS: There were three groups of participants: medical students (n = 281), who completed a longitudinal survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and an open question about empathy at the beginning and end of the 2013 academic year; private doctors (medical practitioners) in South Australia (n = 78) who completed a survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and an open question about empathy at the end of the students' academic year; and doctors (medical practitioners) from public teaching hospitals (n = 72) in southern Adelaide, South Australia who completed a survey consisting of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy at the end of the students' academic year ...
October 18, 2016: BMC Medical Education
Diana Bairaktarova, Anna Woodcock
Professional communities are experiencing scandals involving unethical and illegal practices daily. Yet it should not take a national major structure failure to highlight the importance of ethical awareness and behavior, or the need for the development and practice of ethical behavior in engineering students. Development of ethical behavior skills in future engineers is a key competency for engineering schools as ethical behavior is a part of the professional identity and practice of engineers. While engineering educators have somewhat established instructional methods to teach engineering ethics, they still rely heavily on teaching ethical awareness, and pay little attention to how well ethical awareness predicts ethical behavior...
October 17, 2016: Science and Engineering Ethics
Wade Skoien, Katie Page, William Parsonage, Sarah Ashover, Tanya Milburn, Louise Cullen
BACKGROUND: The translation of healthcare research into practice is typically challenging and limited in effectiveness. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) identifies 12 domains of behaviour determinants which can be used to understand the principles of behavioural change, a key factor influencing implementation. The Accelerated Chest pain Risk Evaluation (ACRE) project has successfully translated research into practice, by implementing an intervention to improve the assessment of low to intermediate risk patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with chest pain...
October 12, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
Stylianos Hatzipanagos, Bernadette John, Yuan-Li Tiffany Chiu
BACKGROUND: Social media can support and sustain communities much better than previous generations of learning technologies, where institutional barriers undermined any initiatives for embedding formal and informal learning. Some of the many types of social media have already had an impact on student learning, based on empirical evidence. One of these, social networking, has the potential to support communication in formal and informal spaces. OBJECTIVE: In this paper we report on the evaluation of an institutional social network-King's Social Harmonisation Project (KINSHIP)-established to foster an improved sense of community, enhance communication, and serve as a space to model digital professionalism for students at King's College London, United Kingdom...
March 3, 2016: JMIR Med Educ
Tabor E Flickinger, Thomas O'Hagan, Margaret S Chisolm
BACKGROUND: As the use of social media (SM) tools becomes increasingly widespread, medical trainees need guidance on applying principles of professionalism to their online behavior. OBJECTIVE: To develop a curriculum to improve knowledge and skills regarding professionalism of SM use by medical students. METHODS: This project was conducted in 3 phases: (1) a needs assessment was performed via a survey of medical students regarding SM use, rationale for and frequency of use, and concerns; (2) a workshop-format curriculum was designed and piloted for preclinical students to gain foundational knowledge of online professionalism; and (3) a complementary longitudinal SM-based curriculum was designed and piloted for clinical students to promote both medical humanism and professionalism...
December 1, 2015: JMIR Med Educ
Louise A Connell, Naoimh E McMahon, Sarah F Tyson, Caroline L Watkins, Janice J Eng
BACKGROUND: Despite best evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of increased intensity of exercise after stroke, current levels of therapy continue to be below those required to optimise motor recovery. We developed and tested an implementation intervention that aims to increase arm exercise in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to illustrate the use of a behaviour change framework, the Behaviour Change Wheel, to identify the mechanisms of action that explain how the intervention produced change...
September 30, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
N Yıldırım, A Karaca, S Cangur, F Acıkgoz, D Akkus
BACKGROUND: Nursing education can be a stressful experience. To fully benefit from this experience and develop a positive professional identity, it is essential for nursing students to effectively cope with education-related stress. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between nursing students' education-related stress and stress coping, self-esteem, social support, and health status. METHOD: This study utilized a cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational design...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Sarah Dennis, Helen K Reddel, Sandy Middleton, Iqbal Hasan, Oshana Hermiz, Rosemary Phillips, Alan J Crockett, Sanjyot Vagholkar, Guy B Marks, Nicholas Zwar
BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is commonly managed in primary care but there is poor awareness of evidence-based guidelines and the quality and interpretation of spirometry is suboptimal. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this qualitative study were to explore how an intervention involving case finding and management of COPD was implemented, and the extent to which the GPs and practice nurses (PNs) worked in partnership to diagnose and manage COPD...
September 30, 2016: Family Practice
Stephen Pack, Sasha Kelly, Monna Arvinen-Barrow
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the role of swimming on Paralympic athletes' perceptions of self and identity development. METHOD: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was taken. During semi-structured interviews, five Paralympic swimmers (aged 20-24 years) were asked questions about their swimming career, perceptions of self, integration, and impairment. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. RESULTS: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis yielded three superordinate themes: (a) "One of the crowd"; none of the participants viewed themselves as disabled, nor as supercrips; these perceptions stemmed from family-, school-, and swimming-related experiences, (b) "Becoming me"; participation in swimming facilitated self- and social-acceptance, and identity development, and c) "A badge of honor"; swimming presented opportunity to present and reinforce a positive identity...
September 27, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Rebecca Waldron, Zoey Malpus, Vanessa Shearing, Melissa Sanchez, Craig D Murray
PURPOSE: End stage heart failure and transplant present great opportunities and challenges for patients of all ages. However, young adulthood may present additional specific challenges associated with the development of identity, career and romantic relationships. Despite recognition of greater mortality rates in young adults, consideration of the experience of transplant during this life stage has been largely overlooked in the literature. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of heart transplant in young adults...
September 24, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Marcus Law, Sarah Wright, Maria Mylopoulos
OBJECTIVE: To obtain a deeper understanding of community faculty members' perceptions about engagement in educational scholarship. DESIGN: One-on-one semistructured interviews that were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and subsequently analyzed. SETTING: Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Purposive, theoretical sample of 8 physician faculty members at the University of Toronto. METHODS: Interview transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach...
September 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
Sheena E Wotherspoon, Peter W McCarthy
BACKGROUND: There are many professional associations representing chiropractors and chiropractic in the United Kingdom (UK). Each has its unique selling points (USPs) and chiropractors can choose to join as many as they like; however, cost of membership has to be weighed against perceived benefits. The predictors of UK chiropractic association membership and motivational factors to join these associations, have not formally been identified. This research study aimed to identify some of the factors and motivations in Welsh Institute of Chiropractic (WIOC) Alumni regarding their decision to join (or not) a UK chiropractic professional association...
2016: Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
E Muddiman, A D Bullock, J MacDonald, L Allery, K L Webb, L Pugsley
OBJECTIVES: An increase in patients with long-term conditions and complex care needs presents new challenges to healthcare providers around the developed world. In response, more broad-based training programmes have developed to better prepare trainees for the changing landscape of healthcare delivery. This paper focuses on qualitative elements of a longitudinal, mixed-methods evaluation of the postgraduate, post-Foundation Broad-Based Training (BBT) programme in England. It aims to provide a qualitative analysis of trainees' evaluations of whether the programme meets its intentions to develop practitioners adept at managing complex cases, patient focused care, specialty integration and conviction in career choice...
2016: BMJ Open
Benjamin Saunders, Bernadette Bartlam, Nadine E Foster, Jonathan C Hill, Vince Cooper, Joanne Protheroe
BACKGROUND: Stratified primary care involves changing General Practitioners' (GPs) clinical behaviour in treating patients, away from the current stepped care approach to instead identifying early treatment options that are matched to patients' risk of persistent disabling pain. This article explores the perspectives of UK-based GPs and patients about a prognostic stratified care model being developed for patients with the five most common primary care musculoskeletal pain presentations...
2016: BMC Family Practice
Catherine Gonsalves, Zareen Zaidi
PURPOSE: There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on 'doing the work of a physician' rather than identity formation and 'being a physician...
2016: Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
Michael Traynor, Niels Buus
Research concludes that professional socialisation in nursing is deeply problematic because new recruits start out identifying with the profession's ideals but lose this idealism as they enter and continue to work in the profession. This study set out to examine the topic focussing on the development of professional identity. Six focus groups were held with a total of 49 2nd and 3rd year BSc nursing students studying at a university in London, UK and their transcripts were subject to discourse analysis. Participants' talk was strongly dualistic and inflected with anxiety...
October 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Eric J Keller, Robert L Vogelzang, Benjamin H Freed, James C Carr, Jeremy D Collins
BACKGROUND: Quality improvement efforts in cardiovascular imaging have been challenged by limited adoption of initiatives and policies. In order to better understand this limitation and inform future efforts, the range clinical values related to cardiovascular imaging at a large academic hospital was characterized. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 15 Northwestern Medicine physicians from internal medicine, cardiology, emergency medicine, cardiac/vascular surgery, and radiology were interviewed about their use of cardiovascular imaging and imaging guidelines...
2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
Li Sun, Ying Gao, Juan Yang, Xiao-Ying Zang, Yao-Gang Wang
BACKGROUND: As newcomers to the clinical workplace, nursing students will encounter a high degree of role stress, which is an important predictor of burnout and engagement. Professional identity is theorised to be a key factor in providing high-quality care to improve patient outcomes and is thought to mediate the negative effects of a high-stress workplace and improve clinical performance and job retention. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the level of nursing students' professional identity and role stress at the end of the first sub-internship, and to explore the impact of the nursing students' professional identity and other characteristics on role stress...
November 2016: International Journal of Nursing Studies
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