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Megan K Creutzburg, Robert M Scheller, Melissa S Lucash, Stephen D LeDuc, Mark G Johnson
Balancing economic, ecological and social values has long been a challenge in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, where conflict over timber harvest and old-growth habitat on public lands has been contentious for the past several decades. The Northwest Forest Plan, adopted two decades ago to guide management on federal lands, is currently being revised as the region searches for a balance between sustainable timber yields and habitat for sensitive species. In addition, climate change imposes a high degree of uncertainty on future forest productivity, sustainability of timber harvest, wildfire risk, and species habitat...
October 21, 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Nature
Qirui Zhong, Ye Huang, Huizhong Shen, Yilin Chen, Han Chen, Tianbo Huang, Eddy Y Zeng, Shu Tao
The quantification of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions is necessary for atmospheric research and has been studied extensively. Aiming to build an inventory with both high spatial resolution and detailed source information, this study estimated the monthly nation-level CO emissions from 79 major sources from 1960 to 2013, based on which a 0.1° × 0.1° gridded emission map was developed for 2011 using a recent energy product. The high sectorial resolution of this inventory can help scientists to study the influence of socioeconomic development on emissions, help decision makers to formulate abatement strategies, and potentially benefit emission-reduction scenario modeling and cost-benefit analysis...
October 19, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Peter W Ganzlin, Michael J Gundale, Rachel E Becknell, Cory C Cleveland
Decades of fire suppression following extensive timber harvesting have left much of the forest in the intermountain western United States exceedingly dense, and forest restoration techniques (i.e., thinning and prescribed fire) are increasingly being used in an attempt to mitigate the effects of severe wildfire, to enhance tree growth and regeneration, and to stimulate soil nutrient cycling. While many of the short-term effects of forest restoration have been established, the long-term effects on soil biogeochemical and ecosystem processes are largely unknown...
July 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
David P Blair, Lachlan M McBurney, Wade Blanchard, Sam C Banks, David B Lindenmayer
Understanding the impacts of natural and human disturbances on forest biota is critical for improving forest management. Many studies have examined the separate impacts on fauna and flora of wildfire, conventional logging, and salvage logging, but empirical comparisons across a broad gradient of simultaneous disturbances are lacking. We quantified species richness and frequency of occurrence of vascular plants, and functional group responses, across a gradient of disturbances that occurred concurrently in 2009 in the mountain ash forests of southeastern Australia...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Patricia M Alexandre, Susan I Stewart, Nicholas S Keuler, Murray K Clayton, Miranda H Mockrin, Avi Bar-Massada, Alexandra D Syphard, Volker C Radeloff
Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). Yet, when wildfires occur, typically only a small proportion of the buildings within the fire perimeter are lost, and the question is what determines which buildings burn...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Ayesha I T Tulloch, Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt, Carl R Gosper, Angela Sanders, Iadine Chadès
Changed fire regimes have led to declines of fire-regime-adapted species and loss of biodiversity globally. Fire affects population processes of growth, reproduction, and dispersal in different ways, but there is little guidance about the best fire regime(s) to maintain species population processes in fire-prone ecosystems. We use a process-based approach to determine the best range of fire intervals for keystone plant species in a highly modified Mediterranean ecosystem in southwestern Australia where current fire regimes vary...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
David B Lindenmayer, Steven G Candy, Christopher I MacGregor, Sam C Banks, Martin Westgate, Karen Ikin, Jennifer Pierson, Ayesha Tulloch, Philip Barton
Fire is a major ecological process in ecosystems globally. Its impacts on fauna can be both direct (e.g., mortality) and indirect (e.g., altered habitat), resulting in population recovery being driven by several possible mechanisms. Separating direct from indirect impacts of fire on faunal population recovery can be valuable in guiding management of biodiversity in fire-prone environments. However, resolving the influence of direct and indirect processes remains a key challenge because many processes affecting fauna can change concomitantly with time since fire...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Sharon M Hood, Stephen Baker, Anna Sala
Fire frequency in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density and the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. In response, treatments are often implemented with the goal of increasing ecosystem resilience by increasing resistance to disturbance. We capitalized on an existing replicated study of fire and stand density treatments in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)-Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forest in western Montana, USA, that experienced a naturally occurring mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak 5 yr after implementation of fuels treatments...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan
Most models project warmer and drier climates that will contribute to larger and more frequent wildfires. However, it remains unknown how repeated wildfires alter post-fire successional patterns and forest structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that the number of wildfires, as well as the order and severity of wildfire events interact to alter forest structure and vegetation recovery and implications for vegetation management. In 2014, we examined forest structure, composition, and tree regeneration in stands that burned 1-18 yr before a subsequent 2007 wildfire...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Michael D Caggiano, Wade T Tinkham, Chad Hoffman, Antony S Cheng, Todd J Hawbaker
The wildland-urban interface (WUI), the area where human development encroaches on undeveloped land, is expanding throughout the western United States resulting in increased wildfire risk to homes and communities. Although census based mapping efforts have provided insights into the pattern of development and expansion of the WUI at regional and national scales, these approaches do not provide sufficient detail for fine-scale fire and emergency management planning, which requires maps of individual building locations...
October 2016: Heliyon
Rebecca Z Krouse, Christine A Sorkness, Jeremy J Wildfire, Agustin Calatroni, Rebecca Gruchalla, Gurjit K Khurana Hershey, Meyer Kattan, Andrew H Liu, Melanie Makhija, Stephen J Teach, Joseph B West, Robert A Wood, Edward M Zoratti, Peter J Gergen
CASI is a quantitative measure of asthma severity that was introduced in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in March 2012. This follow-up letter expands upon the initial report by comparing the CASI to an expert clinican assessment of asthma severity. Using expert assessment, we establish risk levels for CASI and calculate other useful parameters such as the minimal important difference (MID) and minimal important effect size.
October 12, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Jaya K Matthews, Clare Stawski, Gerhard Körtner, Cassandra A Parker, Fritz Geiser
Wildfires can completely obliterate above-ground vegetation, yet some small terrestrial mammals survive during and after fires. As knowledge about the physiological and behavioural adaptations that are crucial for post-wildfire survival is scant, we investigated the thermal biology of a small insectivorous marsupial (Antechinus flavipes) after a severe forest fire. Some populations of antechinus survived the fire in situ probably by hiding deep in rocky crevices, the only fire-proof sites near where they were trapped...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
Morgan W Tingley, Viviana Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Robert L Wilkerson, Christine A Howell, Rodney B Siegel
An emerging hypothesis in fire ecology is that pyrodiversity increases species diversity. We test whether pyrodiversity-defined as the standard deviation of fire severity-increases avian biodiversity at two spatial scales, and whether and how this relationship may change in the decade following fire. We use a dynamic Bayesian community model applied to a multi-year dataset of bird surveys at 1106 points sampled across 97 fires in montane California. Our results provide strong support for a positive relationship between pyrodiversity and bird diversity...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Tianhua He, Byron B Lamont, John Manning
Fire has had a profound effect on the evolution of worldwide biotas. The Cape Floristic Region is one of the world's most species-rich regions, yet it is highly prone to recurrent fires and fire-adapted species contribute strongly to the overall flora. It is hypothesized that the current fire regimes in the Cape could be as old as 6-8 million years (My), while indirect evidence indicates that the onset of fire could have reached 18 million years ago (Ma). Here, we trace the origin of fire-dependent traits in two monocot families that are significant elements in the fire-prone Cape flora...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
Christopher E Gordon, Owen F Price, Elizabeth M Tasker, Andrew J Denham
High severity wildfires pose threats to human assets, but are also perceived to impact vegetation communities because a small number of species may become dominant immediately after fire. However there are considerable gaps in our knowledge about species-specific responses of plants to different fire severities, and how this influences fuel hazard in the short and long-term. Here we conduct a floristic survey at sites before and two years after a wildfire of unprecedented size and severity in the Warrumbungle National Park (Australia) to explore relationships between post-fire growth of a fire responsive shrub genera (Acacia), total mid-story vegetation cover, fire severity and fuel hazard...
September 28, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Luciana Ghermandi, Natacha A Beletzky, Mónica I de Torres Curth, Facundo J Oddi
The overlapping zone between urbanization and wildland vegetation, known as the wildland urban interface (WUI), is often at high risk of wildfire. Human activities increase the likelihood of wildfires, which can have disastrous consequences for property and land use, and can pose a serious threat to lives. Fire hazard assessments depend strongly on the spatial scale of analysis. We assessed the fire hazard in a WUI area of a Patagonian city by working at three scales: landscape, community and species. Fire is a complex phenomenon, so we used a large number of variables that correlate a priori with the fire hazard...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Environmental Management
Anthony LeRoy Westerling
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Y García, M C Castellanos, J G Pausas
Fire has a key role in the ecology and evolution of many ecosystems, yet its effects on plant-insect interactions are poorly understood. Because interacting species are likely to respond to fire differently, disruptions of the interactions are expected. We hypothesized that plants that regenerate after fire can benefit through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions. We expected stronger effects on interactions with specialist predators than with generalists. We studied two interactions between two Mediterranean plants (Ulex parviflorus, Asphodelus ramosus) and their specialist seed predators after large wildfires...
December 2016: Oecologia
Erin Conlisk, Rebecca Swab, Alejandra Martínez-Berdeja, Matthew P Daugherty
Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration...
2016: PloS One
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