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Journal of the Intensive Care Society

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30160259/corrigendum-for-intensive-care-society-state-of-the-art-2016-abstracts
#1
(no author information available yet)
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1177/1751143717708966.].
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30160258/corrigendum-for-intensive-care-society-state-of-the-art-2017-abstracts
#2
(no author information available yet)
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1177/1751143718772957.].
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159022/reply-from-authors-to-letter-on-temporising-an-extradural-haematoma-by-intraosseous-needle-craniostomy-in-the-district-general-hospital-by-non-neurosurgical-doctors-a-case-report
#3
Sahra Durnford, Harry Bulstrode, Andrew Durnford, Aabir Chakraborty, Nicholas Tarmey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159021/temporising-an-extradural-haematoma-by-intraosseous-needle-craniostomy-in-the-district-general-hospital-by-non-neurosurgical-doctors-a-response
#4
Matthew Wiles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159020/classic-cases-revisited-mr-miura-and-the-delusion-of-immortality
#5
Piotr Szawarski
Death continues to be viewed as a failure by many clinicians and society. For now however, it remains a biological certainty and to think otherwise is to delude oneself. Nevertheless, the society is becoming older and many individuals enjoy fulfilling life in spite of advancing years. The trajectory of age-related physiological deterioration varies, introducing an uncertainty as to the potential for survival when faced with critical illness. There is risk of harm associated with invasive interventions and utility of such remains uncertain in the very elderly...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159019/are-morbidity-and-mortality-case-review-practices-in-scottish-intensive-care-units-aligned-to-national-standards
#6
Mohammed Mo Faik Al-Haddad, Andrew Cadamy, Euan Black, Kate Slade
Introduction: Both Scottish and UK standards guidelines recommend that intensive care units should hold regular, structured, multidisciplinary morbidity and mortality meetings. The aim of this survey was to ascertain the nature of current practice with regards to morbidity and mortality case reviews and meetings in all intensive care units in Scotland. Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with a consultant from all Scottish intensive care units...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159018/no-place-like-home-a-case-study-of-a-patient-discharged-from-an-intensive-care-unit-for-end-of-life-care-at-home
#7
David Smith, Donna Hall, Geraldine Parke, Rebecca Lane, Alison Gray
Introduction: Both in the UK and internationally, discharge from an intensive care unit to home for end of life care is a rare and challenging occurrence. These challenges include clinicians' ability to identify appropriate patients in whom it is possible to communicate with about their wishes and preferences, the critical nature of their condition and the interface between hospital and community services. Method: We present a case report of a patient who had been admitted to hospital with a myocardial infarction and subsequently suffered a cardiac arrest, from which he was successfully resuscitated...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159017/decision-making-in-intensive-care-medicine-a-review
#8
REVIEW
Fiona R James, Nicola Power, Shondipon Laha
Decision-making by intensivists around accepting patients to intensive care units is a complex area, with often high-stakes, difficult, emotive decisions being made with limited patient information, high uncertainty about outcomes and extreme pressure to make these decisions quickly. This is exacerbated by a lack of clear guidelines to help guide this difficult decision-making process, with the onus largely relying on clinical experience and judgement. In addition to uncertainty compounding decision-making at the individual clinical level, it is further complicated at the multi-speciality level for the senior doctors and surgeons referring to intensive care units...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159016/a-narrative-review-of-long-term-central-venous-access-devices-for-the-intensivist
#9
REVIEW
David Moir, Andrew Bodenham
Long-term central venous access devices are increasingly prevalent and consequently often encountered by intensivists. This review introduces the different types of long-term central venous access devices, outlines their potential utility, examines potential complications associated with their use and outlines an approach to the management of these complications.
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159015/evaluating-service-development-in-critical-care-the-impact-of-establishing-a-medical-high-dependency-unit-on-intensive-care-unit-workload-case-mix-and-mortality
#10
Nabeel Amiruddin, Gordon J Prescott, Douglas A Coventry, Jan O Jansen
Background: Critical care services underpin the delivery of many types of secondary care, and there is increasing focus on how to best deliver such services. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of establishing a medical high dependency unit, in a tertiary referral center, on the workload, case mix, and mortality of the intensive care unit. Methods: Single-center, 11-year retrospective study of patients admitted to the general intensive care unit, before and after the opening of the medical high dependency unit, using interrupted time series methodology...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159014/establishing-the-use-of-a-safety-attitudes-questionnaire-to-assess-the-safety-climate-across-a-critical-care-network
#11
Antony Thomas, John-Paul Lomas
Aims: We aimed to measure the safety culture across a network of critical care units to compare units, track temporal changes and to present easy to interpret information back to staff. Methods: We provided adapted paper versions of the short ICU 'Safety attitude questionnaire' to 14 critical care units annually between 2015 and 2017. The responses were analysed to establish scores for individual safety domains. Feedback used colour conditional formatted tables to allow easy identification of high and low scores...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159013/12-hour-nursing-shifts-in-critical-care-a-service-evaluation
#12
Ceri Battle, Paul Temblett
The aim of this single-centre study was to investigate the impact of the introduction of 12-h critical care nursing shifts on healthcare provider and patient care outcomes. A single-centre, prospective service evaluation was completed over a two-year period, comparing the 8-h and 12-h shifts. Outcomes included number of clinical incidents, levels of burn-out, sick rates, personal injuries and training. There were no significant differences between the clinical incidents, sickness rates, personal injuries and staff training between the two data collection periods...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159012/characteristics-of-adolescents-requiring-intensive-care-in-the-united-kingdom-a-retrospective-cohort-study
#13
Dora Wood, Sarah Goodwin, John Pappachan, Peter Davis, Roger Parslow, David Harrison, Padmanabhan Ramnarayan
Objectives: To describe the case mix, resource use and outcomes for adolescents admitted to intensive care units in the UK. Methods: Analysis of national prospectively collected data for all adolescents aged 12-19 years admitted to UK adult or paediatric intensive care units. Results: There were 37,320 admissions of adolescents during the eight-year study period. Excluding elective surgery, respiratory diagnoses were the most common reason for paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission, with trauma and intoxication the most common reasons for adult intensive care unit (AICU) admission...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159011/hanging-and-asphyxia-interventions-patient-outcomes-and-resource-utilisation-in-a-uk-tertiary-intensive-care-unit
#14
William Jc Sutcliffe, Anton G Saayman
Introduction: Suicide is increasing in the UK, and hanging is now the commonest mechanism. United Kingdom intensive care unit outcomes (including organ donation) after hanging have not been reported. Methods: Retrospective analysis of cases admitted to a UK tertiary intensive care unit with a primary or secondary diagnosis of hanging/asphyxia. Case analysis divided between those with and without a history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and outcomes described using the cerebral performance category score...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159010/candle-the-critical-analysis-of-the-nocturnal-distribution-of-light-exposure-a-prospective-pilot-study-quantifying-the-nocturnal-light-intensity-on-a-critical-care-unit
#15
Thomas Craig, Steve Mathieu
Patients with critical illness have disrupted circadian rhythms, which can lead to increased morbidity, mortality and length of intensive care unit stay. Light intensity within the intensive care unit influences the circadian rhythm and may therefore impact on patient outcome. We performed an observational single-centre pilot study monitoring nocturnal light exposure of intensive care unit patients between November and December 2016. As there are currently no medical guidance on recommended light levels, we audited our findings against building regulation standards...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159009/exploring-fasting-practices-for-critical-care-patients-a-web-based-survey-of-uk-intensive-care-units
#16
Ella Segaran, Tracy D Lovejoy, Charlie Proctor, Wendy L Bispham, Rebecca Jordan, Bethan Jenkins, Eileen O'Neill, Sarah Ej Harkess, Marius Terblanche
Background: Enteral nutrition delivery in the critically ill is frequently interrupted for surgical and airway procedures to avoid aspiration of stomach contents. Recurrent fasting leads to under delivery of enteral nutrition and this underfeeding is associated with worse outcomes. International fasting recommendations do not provide guidance for intubated patients receiving enteral nutrition. This study aimed to gain a detailed perspective of UK critical care fasting practices. Methods: A web-based survey was sent to 232 UK intensive care units consisting of questions relating to fasting practices, presence of guidelines, average fasting times for common procedures and dietitian time per intensive care unit bed...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159008/an-analysis-of-emergency-tracheal-intubations-in-critically-ill-patients-by-critical-care-trainees
#17
Nishkantha Arulkumaran, Charles S McLaren, Kailash Arulkumaran, Barbara J Philips, Maurizio Cecconi
Introduction: We evaluated intensive care medicine trainees' practice of emergency intubations in the United Kingdom. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 881 in-hospital emergency intubations over a three-year period using an online trainee logbook. Results: Emergency intubations out-of-hours were less frequent than in-hours, both on weekdays and weekends. Complications occurred in 9% of cases, with no association with time of day/day of week (pā€‰=ā€‰0...
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159007/this-month-in-jics
#18
Jonathan Handy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29796080/may-the-force-be-with-you
#19
Wood, Trees
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29796079/lessons-from-lung-ultrasound
#20
David Ashton-Cleary, Colin Bigham, Thomas Clark, Charly Gibson, Nigel Hollister, Barney Kyle
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
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