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JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

J Danielle Sharpe, Richard S Hopkins, Robert L Cook, Catherine W Striley
BACKGROUND: Traditional influenza surveillance relies on influenza-like illness (ILI) syndrome that is reported by health care providers. It primarily captures individuals who seek medical care and misses those who do not. Recently, Web-based data sources have been studied for application to public health surveillance, as there is a growing number of people who search, post, and tweet about their illnesses before seeking medical care. Existing research has shown some promise of using data from Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia to complement traditional surveillance for ILI...
October 20, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Karen Assmann, Valentina Andreeva, Katia Castebon, Caroline Méjean, Mathilde Touvier, Benoît Salanave, Valérie Deschamps, Sandrine Péneau, Léopold Fezeu, Chantal Julia, Benjamin Allès, Pilar Galan, Serge Hercberg
BACKGROUND: Traditional epidemiological research methods exhibit limitations leading to high logistics, human, and financial burden. The continued development of innovative digital tools has the potential to overcome many of the existing methodological issues. Nonetheless, Web-based studies remain relatively uncommon, partly due to persistent concerns about validity and generalizability. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this viewpoint is to summarize findings from methodological studies carried out in the NutriNet-Santé study, a French Web-based cohort study...
October 18, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Quynh C Nguyen, Dapeng Li, Hsien-Wen Meng, Suraj Kath, Elaine Nsoesie, Feifei Li, Ming Wen
BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that where people live, play, and work can influence health and well-being. However, the dearth of neighborhood data, especially data that is timely and consistent across geographies, hinders understanding of the effects of neighborhoods on health. Social media data represents a possible new data resource for neighborhood research. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to build, from geotagged Twitter data, a national neighborhood database with area-level indicators of well-being and health behaviors...
October 17, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Apurv Soni, Allison Earon, Anna Handorf, Nisha Fahey, Kandarp Talati, John Bostrom, Ki Chon, Craig Napolitano, Michael Chin, John Sullivan, Shyamsundar Raithatha, Robert Goldberg, Somashekhar Nimbalkar, Jeroan Allison, Sunil Thanvi, David McManus
BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation, the world's most common arrhythmia, is a leading risk factor for stroke, a disease striking nearly 1.6 million Indians annually. Early detection and management of atrial fibrillation is a promising opportunity to prevent stroke but widespread screening programs in limited resource settings using conventional methods is difficult and costly. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to screen people for atrial fibrillation in rural western India using a US Food and Drug Administration-approved single-lead electrocardiography device, Alivecor...
October 13, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Rebecca Ling, Joon Lee
BACKGROUND: Infodemiology can offer practical and feasible health research applications through the practice of studying information available on the Web. Google Trends provides publicly accessible information regarding search behaviors in a population, which may be studied and used for health campaign evaluation and disease monitoring. Additional studies examining the use and effectiveness of Google Trends for these purposes remain warranted. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore the use of infodemiology in the context of health campaign evaluation and chronic disease monitoring...
October 12, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Robert Eugene Hoyt, Dallas Snider, Carla Thompson, Sarita Mantravadi
BACKGROUND: We live in an era of explosive data generation that will continue to grow and involve all industries. One of the results of this explosion is the need for newer and more efficient data analytics procedures. Traditionally, data analytics required a substantial background in statistics and computer science. In 2015, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) released the IBM Watson Analytics (IBMWA) software that delivered advanced statistical procedures based on the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS)...
October 11, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Jason Mitchell, Ji-Young Lee, Rob Stephenson
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/publichealth.6392.].
September 26, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Jason Mitchell, Ji-Young Lee, Rob Stephenson
BACKGROUND: As interest increases in the development of eHealth human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-preventive interventions for gay male couples, Web-based methods must also be developed to help increase the likelihood that couples enrolled and data collected from them represent true unique dyads. Methods to recruit and collect reliable and valid data from both members of a couple are lacking, yet are crucial for uptake of novel sexual health and HIV-prevention eHealth interventions. Methods to describe best practices to recruit male couples using targeted advertisements on Facebook are also lacking in the literature, yet could also help in this uptake...
September 20, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Amanda Reichard, Suzanne McDermott, Margaret Ruttenber, Joshua Mann, Michael G Smith, Julie Royer, Rodolfo Valdez
BACKGROUND: Owing to their low prevalence, single rare conditions are difficult to monitor through current state passive and active case ascertainment systems. However, such monitoring is important because, as a group, rare conditions have great impact on the health of affected individuals and the well-being of their caregivers. A viable approach could be to conduct passive and active case ascertainment of several rare conditions simultaneously. This is a report about the feasibility of such an approach...
August 29, 2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Janan Janine Dietrich, Fatima Laher, Stefanie Hornschuh, Busisiwe Nkala, Lucy Chimoyi, Kennedy Otwombe, Angela Kaida, Glenda Elisabeth Gray, Cari Miller
BACKGROUND: Internet access via mobile phones and computers facilitates interaction and potential health communication among individuals through social networking. Many South African adolescents own mobile phones and can access social networks via apps. OBJECTIVE: We investigated sociodemographic factors and HIV risk behaviors of adolescent social networking users in Soweto, South Africa. METHODS: We conducted an interviewer-administered, cross-sectional survey of adolescents aged 14-19 years...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Alessandro R Marcon, Philip Klostermann, Timothy Caulfield
BACKGROUND: Spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) is a popular though controversial practice. The debates surrounding efficacy and risk of SMT are only partially evident in popular discourse. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the presence of critiques and debates surrounding efficacy and risk of SMT on the social media platform Twitter. The study examines whether there is presence of debate and whether critical information is being widely disseminated. METHODS: An initial corpus of 31,339 tweets was compiled through Twitter's Search Application Programming Interface using the query terms "chiropractic," "chiropractor," and "spinal manipulation therapy...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Junrui Di, Ying Li, M Reuel Friedman, Susheel Reddy, Pamela J Surkan, Steven Shoptaw, Michael Plankey
BACKGROUND: Survey satisficing occurs when participants respond to survey questions rapidly without carefully reading or comprehending them. Studies have demonstrated the occurrence of survey satisficing, which can degrade survey quality, particularly in longitudinal studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to use a group-based trajectory analysis method to identify satisficers when similar survey questions were asked periodically in a long-standing cohort, and to examine factors associated with satisficing in the surveys having sensitive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related behavioral questions...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Jasna Loos, Lazare Manirankunda, Tom Platteau, Laura Albers, Katrien Fransen, Tine Vermoesen, Fiona Namanya, Christiana Nöstlinger
BACKGROUND: Late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnosis is common among sub-Saharan African migrants. To address their barriers to HIV testing uptake and improve timely HIV diagnoses and linkage to care, the outreach HIV testing intervention, "swab2know," was developed. It combined a community-based approach with innovative testing methods: oral fluid self-sampling and the choice between Web-based HIV test result collections using a secured website or post-test counseling at a sexual health clinic...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Marcella K Jones, Liviana Calzavara, Dan Allman, Catherine A Worthington, Mark Tyndall, James Iveniuk
BACKGROUND: Response differences to survey questions are known to exist for different modes of questionnaire completion. Previous research has shown that response differences by mode are larger for sensitive and complicated questions. However, it is unknown what effect completion mode may have on HIV and AIDS survey research, which addresses particularly sensitive and stigmatized health issues. OBJECTIVES: We seek to compare responses between self-selected Web and telephone respondents in terms of social desirability and item nonresponse in a national HIV and AIDS survey...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Sarah Meaney, Leanne Cussen, Richard A Greene, Keelin O'Donoghue
BACKGROUND: Participation in social networking sites is commonplace and the micro-blogging site Twitter can be considered a platform for the rapid broadcasting of news stories. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the Twitter status updates and subsequent responses relating to a number of perinatal deaths which occurred in a small maternity unit in Ireland. METHODS: An analysis of Twitter status updates, over a two month period from January to March 2014, was undertaken to identify the key themes arising in relation to the perinatal deaths...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Shauna Stahlman, Travis Howard Sanchez, Patrick Sean Sullivan, Sosthenes Ketende, Carrie Lyons, Manhattan E Charurat, Fatou Maria Drame, Daouda Diouf, Rebecca Ezouatchi, Seni Kouanda, Simplice Anato, Tampose Mothopeng, Zandile Mnisi, Stefan David Baral
BACKGROUND: There has been increased attention for the need to reduce stigma related to sexual behaviors among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) as part of comprehensive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and treatment programming. However, most studies focused on measuring and mitigating stigma have been in high-income settings, challenging the ability to characterize the transferability of these findings because of lack of consistent metrics across settings...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Sulaf Assi, Jordan Thomas, Mohamed Haffar, David Osselton
BACKGROUND: In recent years, lifestyle products have emerged to help improve people's physical and mental performance. The Internet plays a major role in the spread of these products. However, the literature has reported issues regarding the authenticity of medicines purchased from the Internet and the impact of counterfeit medicines on public health. Little or no data are available on the authenticity of lifestyle products and actual toxicity associated with their use and misuse. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate consumer and patient attitudes toward the purchase of lifestyle products from the Internet, their knowledge of product authenticity and toxicity, and their experiences with counterfeit lifestyle products...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Kay Connelly, Karen F Stein, Beenish Chaudry, Nicole Trabold
BACKGROUND: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a popular method for understanding population health in which participants report their experiences while in naturally occurring contexts in order to increase the reliability and ecological validity of the collected data (as compared to retrospective recall). EMA studies, however, have relied primarily on text-based questionnaires, effectively eliminating low-literacy populations from the samples. OBJECTIVE: To provide a case study of design of an EMA mobile app for a low-literacy population...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Julia Hudnut-Beumler, Eli Po'e, Shari Barkin
BACKGROUND: The Internet is an increasingly popular platform for public health interventions due to its distinct ability to communicate with, engage, and educate communities. Given the widespread use of the Internet, these interventions could be a means of equalizing access to information to address health disparities in minority populations, such as Hispanics. Hispanics are disproportionately affected by poor health outcomes, including obesity, diabetes, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
Courtney Rees Lyles, Andrew Godbehere, Gem Le, Laurent El Ghaoui, Urmimala Sarkar
BACKGROUND: It is difficult to synthesize the vast amount of textual data available from social media websites. Capturing real-world discussions via social media could provide insights into individuals' opinions and the decision-making process. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a sequential mixed methods study to determine the utility of sparse machine learning techniques in summarizing Twitter dialogues. We chose a narrowly defined topic for this approach: cervical cancer discussions over a 6-month time period surrounding a change in Pap smear screening guidelines...
2016: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
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