journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30338262/higher-dispersion-measures-of-conduction-and-repolarization-in-type-1-compared-to-non-type-1-brugada-syndrome-patients-an-electrocardiographic-study-from-a-single-center
#1
Gary Tse, Ka Hou Christien Li, Guangping Li, Tong Liu, George Bazoukis, Wing Tak Wong, Matthew T V Chan, Martin C S Wong, Yunlong Xia, Konstantinos P Letsas, Gary Chin Pang Chan, Yat Sun Chan, William K K Wu
Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a cardiac ion channelopathy that predisposes affected individuals to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Type 1 BrS is thought to take a more malignant clinical course than non-type 1 BrS. We hypothesized that the degrees of abnormal repolarization and conduction are greater in type 1 subjects and these differences can be detected by electrocardiography (ECG). Methods: Electrocardiographic data from spontaneous type 1 and non-type 1 BrS patients were analyzed. ECG parameters were measured from leads V1 to V3...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30333983/cardiomyocytes-and-macrophages-discourse-on-the-method-to-govern-cardiac-repair
#2
REVIEW
Ingrid Gomez, Vincent Duval, Jean-Sébastien Silvestre
In response to pathophysiological stress, the cardiac tissue undergoes profound remodeling process that incorporates the elimination of dying resident cells, compensatory hypertrophy of functional cardiomyocytes, growth and remodeling of the vascular compartment and formation of a fibrotic scar. Accumulating evidences indicate that cardiac remodeling is, at least in part, controlled by a complex crosstalk between cardiomyocytes and macrophages. The strategic location of abundant macrophages to the proximity of cardiomyocytes suggest that they could regulate the fate of cardiomyocytes in the injured heart...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30327767/disease-modifiers-of-inherited-scn5a-channelopathy
#3
REVIEW
Arie O Verkerk, Ahmad S Amin, Carol Ann Remme
To date, a large number of mutations in SCN5A , the gene encoding the pore-forming α-subunit of the primary cardiac Na+ channel (NaV 1.5), have been found in patients presenting with a wide range of ECG abnormalities and cardiac syndromes. Although these mutations all affect the same NaV 1.5 channel, the associated cardiac syndromes each display distinct phenotypical and biophysical characteristics. Variable disease expressivity has also been reported, where one particular mutation in SCN5A may lead to either one particular symptom, a range of various clinical signs, or no symptoms at all, even within one single family...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30324109/cd100-effects-in-macrophages-and-its-roles-in-atherosclerosis
#4
REVIEW
Maria C A Luque, Mariana K Galuppo, Janaina Capelli-Peixoto, Beatriz S Stolf
CD100 or Sema4D is a protein from the semaphorin family with important roles in the vascular, nervous and immune systems. It may be found as a membrane bound dimer or as a soluble molecule originated by proteolytic cleavage. Produced by the majority of hematopoietic cells including B and T lymphocytes, natural killer and myeloid cells, as well as endothelial cells, CD100 exerts its actions by binding to different receptors depending on the cell type and on the organism. Cell-to-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, phagocytosis, T cell priming, and antibody production are examples of the many functions of this molecule...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30324108/cardiovascular-effects-and-benefits-of-exercise
#5
REVIEW
Matthew A Nystoriak, Aruni Bhatnagar
It is widely accepted that regular physical activity is beneficial for cardiovascular health. Frequent exercise is robustly associated with a decrease in cardiovascular mortality as well as the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Physically active individuals have lower blood pressure, higher insulin sensitivity, and a more favorable plasma lipoprotein profile. Animal models of exercise show that repeated physical activity suppresses atherogenesis and increases the availability of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30320124/endothelial-transcytosis-of-lipoproteins-in-atherosclerosis
#6
REVIEW
Xinbo Zhang, William C Sessa, Carlos Fernández-Hernando
Seminal studies from Nikolai Anichckov identified the accumulation of cholesterol in the arteries as the initial event that lead to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Further studies by Gofman and colleagues demonstrated that high levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was responsible for the accelerated atherosclerosis observed in humans. These findings were confirmed by numerous epidemiological studies which identified elevated LDL-C levels as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30320123/discrete-subaortic-stenosis-perspective-roadmap-to-a-complex-disease
#7
Danielle D Massé, Jason A Shar, Kathleen N Brown, Sundeep G Keswani, K Jane Grande-Allen, Philippe Sucosky
Discrete subaortic stenosis (DSS) is a congenital heart disease that results in the formation of a fibro-membranous tissue, causing an increased pressure gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). While surgical resection of the membrane has shown some success in eliminating the obstruction, it poses significant risks associated with anesthesia, sternotomy, and heart bypass, and it remains associated with a high rate of recurrence. Although a genetic etiology had been initially proposed, the association between DSS and left ventricle (LV) geometrical abnormalities has provided more support to a hemodynamic etiology by which congenital or post-surgical LVOT geometric derangements could generate abnormal shear forces on the septal wall, triggering in turn a fibrotic response...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30283791/editorial-extracellular-vesicle-mediated-processes-in-cardiovascular-diseases
#8
EDITORIAL
Rory R Koenen, Elena Aikawa
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30283790/transcatheter-tricuspid-valve-replacement-principles-and-design
#9
REVIEW
Ozan M Demir, Damiano Regazzoli, Antonio Mangieri, Marco B Ancona, Satoru Mitomo, Giora Weisz, Antonio Colombo, Azeem Latib
Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) may affect as much as 65-85% of the population with the prevalence of moderate-to-severe TR in the United States reported at greater than 1.6 million. However, only 8,000 tricuspid valve operations are performed annually in the United States. As severe TR is associated with poor outcomes, there is an unmet clinical need for surgical or percutaneous transcatheter based treatment of TR. Over the last two decades there have been significant developments in percutaneous transcatheter based therapies for valvular disease...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30283789/genetic-and-tissue-engineering-approaches-to-modeling-the-mechanics-of-human-heart-failure-for-drug-discovery
#10
REVIEW
Michael J Greenberg, Neil J Daily, Ann Wang, Michael K Conway, Tetsuro Wakatsuki
Heart failure is the leading cause of death in the western world and as such, there is a great need for new therapies. Heart failure has a variable presentation in patients and a complex etiology; however, it is fundamentally a condition that affects the mechanics of cardiac contraction, preventing the heart from generating sufficient cardiac output under normal operating pressures. One of the major issues hindering the development of new therapies has been difficulties in developing appropriate in vitro model systems of human heart failure that recapitulate the essential changes in cardiac mechanics seen in the disease...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30283788/changing-metabolism-in-differentiating-cardiac-progenitor-cells-can-stem-cells-become-metabolically-flexible-cardiomyocytes
#11
REVIEW
Sophia Malandraki-Miller, Colleen A Lopez, Heba Al-Siddiqi, Carolyn A Carr
The heart is a metabolic omnivore and the adult heart selects the substrate best suited for each circumstance, with fatty acid oxidation preferred in order to fulfill the high energy demand of the contracting myocardium. The fetal heart exists in an hypoxic environment and obtains the bulk of its energy via glycolysis. After birth, the "fetal switch" to oxidative metabolism of glucose and fatty acids has been linked to the loss of the regenerative phenotype. Various stem cell types have been used in differentiation studies, but most are cultured in high glucose media...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30280101/response-gene-to-complement-32-in-vascular-diseases
#12
REVIEW
Xiao-Bing Cui, Shi-You Chen
Response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) is a protein that was identified in rat oligodendrocytes after complement activation. It is expressed in most of the organs and tissues, such as brain, placenta, heart, and the liver. Functionally, RGC32 is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, fibrosis, metabolic disease, and cancer. Emerging evidences support the roles of RGC32 in vascular diseases. RGC32 promotes injury-induced vascular neointima formation by mediating smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30280100/mapping-and-ablation-of-idiopathic-ventricular-fibrillation
#13
REVIEW
Ghassen Cheniti, Konstantinos Vlachos, Marianna Meo, Stephane Puyo, Nathaniel Thompson, Arnaud Denis, Josselin Duchateau, Masateru Takigawa, Claire Martin, Antonio Frontera, Takeshi Kitamura, Anna Lam, Felix Bourier, Nicolas Klotz, Nicolas Derval, Frederic Sacher, Pierre Jais, Remi Dubois, Meleze Hocini, Michel Haissaguerre
Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) is the main cause of unexplained sudden cardiac death, particularly in young patients under the age of 35. IVF is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients who have survived a VF episode without any identifiable structural or metabolic causes despite extensive diagnostic testing. Genetic testing allows identification of a likely causative mutation in up to 27% of unexplained sudden deaths in children and young adults. In the majority of cases, VF is triggered by PVCs that originate from the Purkinje network...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30276199/medial-hypoxia-and-adventitial-vasa-vasorum-remodeling-in-human-ascending-aortic-aneurysm
#14
Marie Billaud, Jennifer C Hill, Tara D Richards, Thomas G Gleason, Julie A Phillippi
Human ascending aortic aneurysms characteristically exhibit cystic medial degeneration of the aortic wall encompassing elastin degeneration, proteoglycan accumulation and smooth muscle cell loss. Most studies have focused on the aortic media and there is a limited understanding of the importance of the adventitial layer in the setting of human aneurysmal disease. We recently demonstrated that the adventitial ECM contains key angiogenic factors that are downregulated in aneurysmal aortic specimens. In this study, we investigated the adventitial microvascular network (vasa vasorum) of aneurysmal aortic specimens of different etiology and hypothesized that the vasa vasorum is disrupted in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30258845/the-role-of-allograft-inflammatory-factor-1-in-the-effects-of-experimental-diabetes-on-b-cell-functions-in-the-heart
#15
Amrita Sarkar, Sanket K Shukla, Aseel Alqatawni, Anil Kumar, Sankar Addya, Alexander Y Tsygankov, Khadija Rafiq
Diabetes mellitus (DM) often causes chronic inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis and fibrosis in the heart and subsequently leads to myocardial remodeling, deteriorated cardiac function and heart failure. However, the etiology of the cardiac disease is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the gene expression in the left ventricle of diabetic and non-diabetic mice using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1), one of the top downregulated B cell inflammatory genes, is associated with B cell functions in inflammatory responses...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30255026/metabolic-mechanisms-of-exercise-induced-cardiac-remodeling
#16
REVIEW
Kyle Fulghum, Bradford G Hill
Exercise has a myriad of physiological benefits that derive in part from its ability to improve cardiometabolic health. The periodic metabolic stress imposed by regular exercise appears fundamental in driving cardiovascular tissue adaptation. However, different types, intensities, or durations of exercise elicit different levels of metabolic stress and may promote distinct types of tissue remodeling. In this review, we discuss how exercise affects cardiac structure and function and how exercise-induced changes in metabolism regulate cardiac adaptation...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30250846/dicarbonyl-stress-and-glyoxalase-1-in-skeletal-muscle-implications-for-insulin-resistance-and-type-2-diabetes
#17
REVIEW
Jacob T Mey, Jacob M Haus
Glyoxalase-1 (GLO1) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein which plays a role in the natural maintenance of cellular health and is abundantly expressed in human skeletal muscle. A consequence of reduced GLO1 protein expression is cellular dicarbonyl stress, which is elevated in obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Both in vitro and pre-clinical models suggest dicarbonyl stress per se induces insulin resistance and is prevented by GLO1 overexpression, implicating a potential role for GLO1 therapy in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM)...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30238007/ponatinib-activates-an-inflammatory-response-in-endothelial-cells-via-erk5-sumoylation
#18
Jesus Paez-Mayorga, Andrew L Chen, Sivareddy Kotla, Yunting Tao, Rei J Abe, Emma D He, Brian P Danysh, Marie-Claude C Hofmann, Nhat-Tu Le
Ponatinib is a multi-targeted third generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) used in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients harboring the Abelson (Abl)-breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) T315I mutation. In spite of having superb clinical efficacy, ponatinib triggers severe vascular adverse events (VAEs) that significantly limit its therapeutic potential. On vascular endothelial cells (ECs), ponatinib promotes EC dysfunction and apoptosis, and inhibits angiogenesis. Furthermore, ponatinib-mediated anti-angiogenic effect has been suggested to play a partial role in systemic and pulmonary hypertension via inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30234130/prolonged-postoperative-vasoplegia-in-pediatric-patients-on-chronic-angiotensin-ii-blocker-treatment
#19
Nischal R Pandya, Nelson Alphonso, Quyen Tu, Prem Venugopal, Luregn J Schlapbach
Prolonged postoperative vasoplegia is known to occur following cardiac surgery in patients on chronic angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment in adults. The perioperative management of these drugs in the pediatric population is not well described and here we would like to highlight this fact. While ARBs are increasingly used in children and adolescents with hypertension, there is lack of data to guide optimal pre-surgical management in the pediatric age group. We report two cases of prolonged vasoplegia following cardiopulmonary bypass occurring in adolescent patients on chronic ARB therapy and the importance of cessation of these drugs preoperatively...
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30234129/surgical-techniques-for-tricuspid-valve-disease
#20
REVIEW
Igor Belluschi, Benedetto Del Forno, Elisabetta Lapenna, Teodora Nisi, Giuseppe Iaci, David Ferrara, Alessandro Castiglioni, Ottavio Alfieri, Michele De Bonis
Tricuspid valve disease affects millions of patients worldwide. It has always been considered less relevant than the left-side valves of the heart, but this "forgotten valve" still represents a great challenge for the cardiac surgeons, especially in the most difficult symptomatic scenarios. In this review we analyze the wide spectrum of surgical techniques for the treatment of a diseased tricuspid valve.
2018: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
journal
journal
52646
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"