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Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27861647/the-link-between-autonomic-and-behavioral-thermoregulation
#1
COMMENT
Boris R M Kingma
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857963/a-continent-wide-analysis-of-the-shade-requirements-of-red-and-western-grey-kangaroos
#2
J A Roberts, G Coulson, A J Munn, M R Kearney
Foraging time may be constrained by a suite of phenomena including weather, which can restrict a species' activity and energy intake. This is recognized as pivotal for many species whose distributions are known to correlate with climate, including kangaroos, although such impacts are rarely quantified. We explore how differences in shade seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior, of 2 closely-related kangaroo species, Macropus rufus (red kangaroos) and M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroos), might reflect differences in their distributions across Australia...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857962/functional-analysis-of-ryr1-variants-linked-to-malignant-hyperthermia
#3
Jeremy Stephens, Anja H Schiemann, Cornelia Roesl, Dorota Miller, Sean Massey, Neil Pollock, Terasa Bulger, Kathryn Stowell
Malignant hyperthermia manifests as a rapid and sustained rise in temperature in response to pharmacological triggering agents, e.g. inhalational anesthetics and the muscle relaxant suxamethonium. Other clinical signs include an increase in end-tidal CO2, increased O2 consumption, as well as tachycardia, and if untreated a malignant hyperthermia episode can result in death. The metabolic changes are caused by dysregulation of skeletal muscle Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting from a defective ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel, which resides in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and controls the flux of Ca(2+) ions from intracellular stores to the cytoplasm...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857961/physiologic-and-performance-effects-of-sago-supplementation-before-and-during-cycling-in-a-warm-humid-environment
#4
Mohd Rahimi Che Jusoh, Stephen R Stannard, Toby Mündel
The present study determined whether 0.8g/kg bodyweight sago ingested before (Pre-Sago) or during (Dur-Sago) exercise under warm-humid conditions (30 ± 2°C, 78 ± 3 % RH; 20 km·h(-1) frontal airflow) conferred a performance and/or physiological benefit compared to a control (Control) condition. Eight trained, male cyclists/triathletes (45 ± 4 y, VO2peak: 65 ± 10 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), peak aerobic power: 397 ± 71 W) completed 3 15-min time-trials (∼75% VO2peak) pre-loaded with 45 min of steady-state (∼55% VO2peak) cycling following > 24 h standardization of training and diet...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857960/heat-strain-during-military-training-activities-the-dilemma-of-balancing-force-protection-and-operational-capability
#5
Andrew P Hunt, Daniel C Billing, Mark J Patterson, Joanne N Caldwell
Military activities in hot environments pose 2 competing demands: the requirement to perform realistic training to develop operational capability with the necessity to protect armed forces personnel against heat-related illness. To ascertain whether work duration limits for protection against heat-related illness restrict military activities, this study examined the heat strain and risks of heat-related illness when conducting a military activity above the prescribed work duration limits. Thirty-seven soldiers conducted a march (10 km; ∼5...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857959/head-temperature-modulates-thermal-behavior-in-the-cold-in-humans
#6
Toby Mündel, Aaron Raman, Zachary J Schlader
We tested the hypothesis that skin temperature, specifically of the head, is capable of modulating thermal behavior during exercise in the cold. Following familiarization 8 young, healthy, recreationally active males completed 3 trials, each consisting of 30 minutes of self-paced cycle ergometry in 6°C. Participants were instructed to control their exercise work rate to achieve and maintain thermal comfort. On one occasion participants wore only shorts and shoes (Control) and on the 2 other occasions their head was either warmed (Warming) or cooled (Cooling)...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857958/substantive-hemodynamic-and-thermal-strain-upon-completing-lower-limb-hot-water-immersion-comparisons-with-treadmill-running
#7
Kate N Thomas, André M van Rij, Samuel J E Lucas, Andrew R Gray, James D Cotter
Exercise induces arterial flow patterns that promote functional and structural adaptations, improving functional capacity and reducing cardiovascular risk. While heat is produced by exercise, local and whole-body passive heating have recently been shown to generate favorable flow profiles and associated vascular adaptations in the upper limb. Flow responses to acute heating in the lower limbs have not yet been assessed, or directly compared to exercise, and other cardiovascular effects of lower-limb heating have not been fully characterized...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857957/hemodynamic-responses-upon-the-initiation-of-thermoregulatory-behavior-in-young-healthy-adults
#8
Zachary J Schlader, Suman Sarker, Toby Mündel, Gregory L Coleman, Christopher L Chapman, James R Sackett, Blair D Johnson
We tested the hypotheses that thermoregulatory behavior is initiated before changes in blood pressure and that skin blood flow upon the initiation of behavior is reflex mediated. Ten healthy young subjects moved between 40°C and 17°C rooms when they felt 'too warm' (W→C) or 'too cool' (C→W). Blood pressure, cardiac output, skin and rectal temperatures were measured. Changes in skin blood flow between locations were not different at 2 forearm locations. One was clamped at 34°C ensuring responses were reflex controlled...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857956/exercise-in-personal-protective-equipment-in-a-hot-humid-environment-does-not-affect-risk-propensity
#9
Zachary J Schlader, Jennifer L Temple, David Hostler
We tested the hypothesis that heat stress created by light exertion in encapsulating personal protective equipment (PPE) in a hot, humid environment increases risk propensity. Ten healthy subjects (29 ± 7 y) completed 2 trials presented in a counter-balanced manner. Subjects donned encapsulating PPE, and in one trial they wore a tube-lined shirt underneath that was perfused with 5°C water. Subjects completed 2 15 min bouts of walking exercise on a treadmill at ˜50% maximal heart rate in a 32°C, 81% RH environment...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857955/non-thermal-modulation-of-sudomotor-function-during-static-exercise-and-the-impact-of-intensity-and-muscle-mass-recruitment
#10
Christopher J Gordon, Joanne N Caldwell, Nigel A S Taylor
Aim: Static muscle activation elicits intensity-dependent, non-thermal sweating that is presumably controlled by feedforward (central command) mechanisms. However, it is currently unknown how the size of the recruited muscle mass interacts with that mechanism. To investigate the possible muscle-size dependency of that non-thermal sweating, the recruitment of two muscle groups of significantly different size was investigated in individuals within whom steady-state thermal sweating had been established and clamped...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857954/heat-stress-gastrointestinal-permeability-and-interleukin-6-signaling-implications-for-exercise-performance-and-fatigue
#11
REVIEW
Nicole Vargas, Frank Marino
Exercise in heat stress exacerbates performance decrements compared to normothermic environments. It has been documented that the performance decrements are associated with reduced efferent drive from the central nervous system (CNS), however, specific factors that contribute to the decrements are not completely understood. During exertional heat stress, blood flow is preferentially distributed away from the intestinal area to supply the muscles and brain with oxygen. Consequently, the gastrointestinal barrier becomes increasingly permeable, resulting in the release of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) into the circulation...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857953/spinal-cord-thermosensitivity-an-afferent-phenomenon
#12
REVIEW
James A Brock, Robin M McAllen
We review the evidence for thermoregulatory temperature sensors in the mammalian spinal cord and reach the following conclusions. 1) Spinal cord temperature contributes physiologically to temperature regulation. 2) Parallel anterolateral ascending pathways transmit signals from spinal cooling and spinal warming: they overlap with the respective axon pathways of the dorsal horn neurons that are driven by peripheral cold- and warm-sensitive afferents. 3) We hypothesize that these 'cold' and 'warm' ascending pathways transmit all extracranial thermosensory information to the brain...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857952/regional-brain-responses-in-humans-during-body-heating-and-cooling
#13
REVIEW
Michael J Farrell
Functional brain imaging of responses to thermal challenge in humans provides a viable method to implicate widespread neuroanatomical regions in the processes of thermoregulation. Thus far, functional neuroimaging techniques have been used infrequently in humans to investigate thermoregulation, although preliminary outcomes have been informative and certainly encourage further forays into this field of enquiry. At this juncture, sustained regional brain activations in response to prolonged changes in body temperature are yet to be definitively characterized, but it would appear that thermoregulatory regions are widely distributed throughout the hemispheres of the human brain...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857951/validation-of-an-ingestible-temperature-data-logging-and-telemetry-system-during-exercise-in-the-heat
#14
Gavin J S Travers, David S Nichols, Abdulaziz Farooq, Sébastien Racinais, Julien D Périard
Aim: Intestinal temperature telemetry systems are promising monitoring and research tools in athletes. However, the additional equipment that must be carried to continuously record temperature data limits their use to training. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a new gastrointestinal temperature data logging and telemetry system (e-Celsius™) during water bath experimentation and exercise trials. Materials and Methods: Temperature readings of 23 pairs of e-Celsius (TeC) and VitalSense (TVS) ingestible capsules were compared to rectal thermistor responses (Trec) at 35, 38...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857950/the-thermal-probe-test-a-novel-behavioral-assay-to-quantify-thermal-paw-withdrawal-thresholds-in-mice
#15
Jennifer R Deuis, Irina Vetter
Rodent models are frequently used to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pain and to develop novel analgesics. Robust behavioral assays that quantify nociceptive responses to different sensory modalities, such has heat, are therefore needed. Here, we describe a novel behavioral assay to quantify thermal paw withdrawal thresholds in mice, called the thermal probe test, and compared it with other methods commonly used to measure heat thresholds, namely the Hargreaves test and the dynamic and conventional hot plate tests...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857949/energy-signaling-in-obese-mice-delays-the-impact-of-fasting-on-thermoregulation
#16
COMMENT
Shane K Maloney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857948/to-drink-or-to-pour-how-should-athletes-use-water-to-cool-themselves
#17
EDITORIAL
Nathan B Morris, Ollie Jay
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857947/from-science-to-practice-development-of-a-thermally-insulated-ice-slushy-dispensing-bottle-that-helps-athletes-keep-their-cool-in-hot-temperatures
#18
EDITORIAL
Paul B Laursen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27227102/characteristics-of-hyperthermia-induced-hyperventilation-in-humans
#19
REVIEW
Bun Tsuji, Keiji Hayashi, Narihiko Kondo, Takeshi Nishiyasu
In humans, hyperthermia leads to activation of a set of thermoregulatory responses that includes cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Hyperthermia also increases ventilation in humans, as is observed in panting dogs, but the physiological significance and characteristics of the hyperventilatory response in humans remain unclear. The relative contribution of respiratory heat loss to total heat loss in a hot environment in humans is small, and this hyperventilation causes a concomitant reduction in arterial CO2 pressure (hypocapnia), which can cause cerebral hypoperfusion...
January 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27227101/body-temperature-regulation-in-diabetes
#20
REVIEW
Glen P Kenny, Ronald J Sigal, Ryan McGinn
The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control...
January 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
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