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Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417098/avoiding-apoptosis-during-mammalian-hibernation
#1
COMMENT
Samantha M Logan, Kenneth B Storey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417097/zika-related-microcephaly-in-experimental-models
#2
COMMENT
Jean Pierre Schatzmann Peron, Patrícia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão Braga
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349097/vagal-afferent-activation-decreases-brown-adipose-tissue-bat-sympathetic-nerve-activity-and-bat-thermogenesis
#3
Christopher J Madden, Ellen Paula Santos da Conceicao, Shaun F Morrison
In urethane/α-chloralose anesthetized rats, electrical stimulation of cervical vagal afferent fibers inhibited the increases in brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis evoked by cold exposure, by nanoinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, and by nanoinjection of N-methyl-D-aspartate in the rostral raphe pallidus. Vagus nerve stimulation-evoked inhibition of brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity was prevented by blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the termination site of vagal afferents in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and by nanoinjection of GABAA receptor antagonists in the rostral raphe pallidus...
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349096/hyperthermia-and-cardiovascular-strain-during-an-extreme-heat-exposure-in-young-versus-older-adults
#4
Glen P Kenny, Martin P Poirier, George S Metsios, Pierre Boulay, Sheila Dervis, Brian J Friesen, Janine Malcolm, Ronald J Sigal, Andrew J E Seely, Andreas D Flouris
We examined whether older individuals experience greater levels of hyperthermia and cardiovascular strain during an extreme heat exposure compared to young adults. During a 3-hour extreme heat exposure (44°C, 30% relative humidity), we compared body heat storage, core temperature (rectal, visceral) and cardiovascular (heart rate, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, limb blood flow) responses of young adults (n = 30, 19-28 years) against those of older adults (n = 30, 55-73 years). Direct calorimetry measured whole-body evaporative and dry heat exchange...
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349095/cooling-interventions-for-athletes-an-overview-of-effectiveness-physiological-mechanisms-and-practical-considerations
#5
REVIEW
Coen C W G Bongers, Maria T E Hopman, Thijs M H Eijsvogels
Exercise-induced increases in core body temperature could negative impact performance and may lead to development of heat-related illnesses. The use of cooling techniques prior (pre-cooling), during (per-cooling) or directly after (post-cooling) exercise may limit the increase in core body temperature and therefore improve exercise performance. The aim of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of current scientific knowledge in the field of pre-cooling, per-cooling and post-cooling. Based on existing studies, we will discuss 1) the effectiveness of cooling interventions, 2) the underlying physiological mechanisms and 3) practical considerations regarding the use of different cooling techniques...
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349094/current-concepts-of-active-vasodilation-in-human-skin
#6
REVIEW
Brett J Wong, Casey G Hollowed
In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups...
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349093/regulation-of-thermotrps-by-lipids
#7
REVIEW
Sara L Morales-Lázaro, Luis Lemus, Tamara Rosenbaum
The family of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels is constituted by 7 subfamilies among which are those that respond to temperature, the thermoTRPs. These channels are versatile molecules of a polymodal nature that have been shown to be modulated in various fashions by molecules of a lipidic nature. Some of these molecules interact directly with the channels on specific regions of their structures and some of these promote changes in membrane fluidity or modify their gating properties in response to their agonists...
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349092/the-trpm2-channel-in-temperature-detection-and-thermoregulation
#8
COMMENT
Gretel B Kamm, Jan Siemens
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349091/ucp1-and-t3-a-key-un-couple-in-energy-balance
#9
Ismael González-García, Miguel López
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349090/the-importance-of-body-temperature-an-anesthesiologist-s-perspective
#10
EDITORIAL
Ryan Matika, Mohab Ibrahim, Amol Patwardhan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349089/thermoregulation-as-a-non-unified-system-a-difficult-to-teach-concept
#11
EDITORIAL
Luca Imeri
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27861647/the-link-between-autonomic-and-behavioral-thermoregulation
#12
COMMENT
Boris R M Kingma
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857963/a-continent-wide-analysis-of-the-shade-requirements-of-red-and-western-grey-kangaroos
#13
J A Roberts, G Coulson, A J Munn, M R Kearney
Foraging time may be constrained by a suite of phenomena including weather, which can restrict a species' activity and energy intake. This is recognized as pivotal for many species whose distributions are known to correlate with climate, including kangaroos, although such impacts are rarely quantified. We explore how differences in shade seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior, of 2 closely-related kangaroo species, Macropus rufus (red kangaroos) and M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroos), might reflect differences in their distributions across Australia...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857962/functional-analysis-of-ryr1-variants-linked-to-malignant-hyperthermia
#14
Jeremy Stephens, Anja H Schiemann, Cornelia Roesl, Dorota Miller, Sean Massey, Neil Pollock, Terasa Bulger, Kathryn Stowell
Malignant hyperthermia manifests as a rapid and sustained rise in temperature in response to pharmacological triggering agents, e.g. inhalational anesthetics and the muscle relaxant suxamethonium. Other clinical signs include an increase in end-tidal CO2, increased O2 consumption, as well as tachycardia, and if untreated a malignant hyperthermia episode can result in death. The metabolic changes are caused by dysregulation of skeletal muscle Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting from a defective ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel, which resides in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and controls the flux of Ca(2+) ions from intracellular stores to the cytoplasm...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857961/physiologic-and-performance-effects-of-sago-supplementation-before-and-during-cycling-in-a-warm-humid-environment
#15
Mohd Rahimi Che Jusoh, Stephen R Stannard, Toby Mündel
The present study determined whether 0.8g/kg bodyweight sago ingested before (Pre-Sago) or during (Dur-Sago) exercise under warm-humid conditions (30 ± 2°C, 78 ± 3 % RH; 20 km·h(-1) frontal airflow) conferred a performance and/or physiological benefit compared to a control (Control) condition. Eight trained, male cyclists/triathletes (45 ± 4 y, VO2peak: 65 ± 10 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), peak aerobic power: 397 ± 71 W) completed 3 15-min time-trials (∼75% VO2peak) pre-loaded with 45 min of steady-state (∼55% VO2peak) cycling following > 24 h standardization of training and diet...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857960/heat-strain-during-military-training-activities-the-dilemma-of-balancing-force-protection-and-operational-capability
#16
Andrew P Hunt, Daniel C Billing, Mark J Patterson, Joanne N Caldwell
Military activities in hot environments pose 2 competing demands: the requirement to perform realistic training to develop operational capability with the necessity to protect armed forces personnel against heat-related illness. To ascertain whether work duration limits for protection against heat-related illness restrict military activities, this study examined the heat strain and risks of heat-related illness when conducting a military activity above the prescribed work duration limits. Thirty-seven soldiers conducted a march (10 km; ∼5...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857959/head-temperature-modulates-thermal-behavior-in-the-cold-in-humans
#17
Toby Mündel, Aaron Raman, Zachary J Schlader
We tested the hypothesis that skin temperature, specifically of the head, is capable of modulating thermal behavior during exercise in the cold. Following familiarization 8 young, healthy, recreationally active males completed 3 trials, each consisting of 30 minutes of self-paced cycle ergometry in 6°C. Participants were instructed to control their exercise work rate to achieve and maintain thermal comfort. On one occasion participants wore only shorts and shoes (Control) and on the 2 other occasions their head was either warmed (Warming) or cooled (Cooling)...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857958/substantive-hemodynamic-and-thermal-strain-upon-completing-lower-limb-hot-water-immersion-comparisons-with-treadmill-running
#18
Kate N Thomas, André M van Rij, Samuel J E Lucas, Andrew R Gray, James D Cotter
Exercise induces arterial flow patterns that promote functional and structural adaptations, improving functional capacity and reducing cardiovascular risk. While heat is produced by exercise, local and whole-body passive heating have recently been shown to generate favorable flow profiles and associated vascular adaptations in the upper limb. Flow responses to acute heating in the lower limbs have not yet been assessed, or directly compared to exercise, and other cardiovascular effects of lower-limb heating have not been fully characterized...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857957/hemodynamic-responses-upon-the-initiation-of-thermoregulatory-behavior-in-young-healthy-adults
#19
Zachary J Schlader, Suman Sarker, Toby Mündel, Gregory L Coleman, Christopher L Chapman, James R Sackett, Blair D Johnson
We tested the hypotheses that thermoregulatory behavior is initiated before changes in blood pressure and that skin blood flow upon the initiation of behavior is reflex mediated. Ten healthy young subjects moved between 40°C and 17°C rooms when they felt 'too warm' (W→C) or 'too cool' (C→W). Blood pressure, cardiac output, skin and rectal temperatures were measured. Changes in skin blood flow between locations were not different at 2 forearm locations. One was clamped at 34°C ensuring responses were reflex controlled...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857956/exercise-in-personal-protective-equipment-in-a-hot-humid-environment-does-not-affect-risk-propensity
#20
Zachary J Schlader, Jennifer L Temple, David Hostler
We tested the hypothesis that heat stress created by light exertion in encapsulating personal protective equipment (PPE) in a hot, humid environment increases risk propensity. Ten healthy subjects (29 ± 7 y) completed 2 trials presented in a counter-balanced manner. Subjects donned encapsulating PPE, and in one trial they wore a tube-lined shirt underneath that was perfused with 5°C water. Subjects completed 2 15 min bouts of walking exercise on a treadmill at ˜50% maximal heart rate in a 32°C, 81% RH environment...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
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