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Science Advances

Masakazu Asahara, Masahiro Koizumi, Thomas E Macrini, Suzanne J Hand, Michael Archer
The modern platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, has an eye structure similar to aquatic mammals; however, platypuses also have a "sixth sense" associated with the bill electro- and mechanoreception that they use without opening their eyes underwater. We hypothesize that Ornithorhynchus and the Miocene taxon Obdurodon have different sensory capacities, which may have resulted from differences in foraging behavior. To estimate differences in foraging, sensory systems, and anatomical divergence between these monotremes, we compared their skull morphologies...
October 2016: Science Advances
Ding Pan, Giulia Galli
Investigating the fate of dissolved carbon dioxide under extreme conditions is critical to understanding the deep carbon cycle in Earth, a process that ultimately influences global climate change. We used first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study carbonates and carbon dioxide dissolved in water at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) approximating the conditions of Earth's upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemical models assuming that molecular CO2(aq) is the major carbon species present in water under deep Earth conditions, we found that at 11 GPa and 1000 K, carbon exists almost entirely in the forms of solvated carbonate ([Formula: see text]) and bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) ions and that even carbonic acid [H2CO3(aq)] is more abundant than CO2(aq)...
October 2016: Science Advances
Matthew A Norcia, Matthew N Winchester, Julia R K Cline, James K Thompson
Laser frequency noise contributes a significant limitation to today's best atomic clocks. A proposed solution to this problem is to create a superradiant laser using an optical clock transition as its gain medium. This laser would act as an active atomic clock and would be highly immune to the fluctuations in reference cavity length that limit today's best lasers. We demonstrate and characterize superradiant emission from the millihertz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of laser-cooled (87)Sr atoms trapped within a high-finesse optical cavity...
October 2016: Science Advances
András Gyenis, Eduardo H da Silva Neto, Ronny Sutarto, Enrico Schierle, Feizhou He, Eugen Weschke, Mariam Kavai, Ryan E Baumbach, Joe D Thompson, Eric D Bauer, Zachary Fisk, Andrea Damascelli, Ali Yazdani, Pegor Aynajian
Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) has recently become an increasingly important tool for the study of ordering phenomena in correlated electron systems. Yet, the interpretation of RXS experiments remains theoretically challenging because of the complexity of the RXS cross section. Central to this debate is the recent proposal that impurity-induced Friedel oscillations, akin to quasi-particle interference signals observed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), can lead to scattering peaks in RXS experiments...
October 2016: Science Advances
André P Antunes, Rachel M Fewster, Eduardo M Venticinque, Carlos A Peres, Taal Levi, Fabio Rohe, Glenn H Shepard
The Amazon basin is the largest and most species-rich tropical forest and river system in the world, playing a pivotal role in global climate regulation and harboring hundreds of traditional and indigenous cultures. It is a matter of intense debate whether the ecosystem is threatened by hunting practices, whereby an "empty forest" loses critical ecological functions. Strikingly, no previous study has examined Amazonian ecosystem resilience through the perspective of the massive 20th century international trade in furs and skins...
October 2016: Science Advances
Yongchul G Chung, Diego A Gómez-Gualdrón, Peng Li, Karson T Leperi, Pravas Deria, Hongda Zhang, Nicolaas A Vermeulen, J Fraser Stoddart, Fengqi You, Joseph T Hupp, Omar K Farha, Randall Q Snurr
Discovery of new adsorbent materials with a high CO2 working capacity could help reduce CO2 emissions from newly commissioned power plants using precombustion carbon capture. High-throughput computational screening efforts can accelerate the discovery of new adsorbents but sometimes require significant computational resources to explore the large space of possible materials. We report the in silico discovery of high-performing adsorbents for precombustion CO2 capture by applying a genetic algorithm to efficiently search a large database of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for top candidates...
October 2016: Science Advances
Liang Hong, Nitin Jain, Xiaolin Cheng, Ana Bernal, Madhusudan Tyagi, Jeremy C Smith
Protein function often depends on global, collective internal motions. However, the simultaneous quantitative experimental determination of the forms, amplitudes, and time scales of these motions has remained elusive. We demonstrate that a complete description of these large-scale dynamic modes can be obtained using coherent neutron-scattering experiments on perdeuterated samples. With this approach, a microscopic relationship between the structure, dynamics, and function in a protein, cytochrome P450cam, is established...
October 2016: Science Advances
Sarah Picaud, Katharina Leonards, Jean-Philippe Lambert, Oliver Dovey, Christopher Wells, Oleg Fedorov, Octovia Monteiro, Takao Fujisawa, Chen-Yi Wang, Hannah Lingard, Cynthia Tallant, Nikzad Nikbin, Lucie Guetzoyan, Richard Ingham, Steven V Ley, Paul Brennan, Susanne Muller, Anastasia Samsonova, Anne-Claude Gingras, Juerg Schwaller, George Vassiliou, Stefan Knapp, Panagis Filippakopoulos
Bromodomains (BRDs) have emerged as compelling targets for cancer therapy. The development of selective and potent BET (bromo and extra-terminal) inhibitors and their significant activity in diverse tumor models have rapidly translated into clinical studies and have motivated drug development efforts targeting non-BET BRDs. However, the complex multidomain/subunit architecture of BRD protein complexes complicates predictions of the consequences of their pharmacological targeting. To address this issue, we developed a promiscuous BRD inhibitor [bromosporine (BSP)] that broadly targets BRDs (including BETs) with nanomolar affinity, creating a tool for the identification of cellular processes and diseases where BRDs have a regulatory function...
October 2016: Science Advances
Dhananjai Saranadhi, Dayong Chen, Justin A Kleingartner, Siddarth Srinivasan, Robert E Cohen, Gareth H McKinley
Skin friction drag contributes a major portion of the total drag for small and large water vehicles at high Reynolds number (Re). One emerging approach to reducing drag is to use superhydrophobic surfaces to promote slip boundary conditions. However, the air layer or "plastron" trapped on submerged superhydrophobic surfaces often diminishes quickly under hydrostatic pressure and/or turbulent pressure fluctuations. We use active heating on a superhydrophobic surface to establish a stable vapor layer or "Leidenfrost" state at a relatively low superheat temperature...
October 2016: Science Advances
Roberto Danovaro, Antonio Dell'Anno, Cinzia Corinaldesi, Eugenio Rastelli, Ricardo Cavicchioli, Mart Krupovic, Rachel T Noble, Takuro Nunoura, David Prangishvili
Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the world's oceans, and they play a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles. In deep-sea ecosystems, archaea and bacteria drive major nutrient cycles, and viruses are largely responsible for their mortality, thereby exerting important controls on microbial dynamics. However, the relative impact of viruses on archaea compared to bacteria is unknown, limiting our understanding of the factors controlling the functioning of marine systems at a global scale...
October 2016: Science Advances
Steven D Karlen, Chengcheng Zhang, Matthew L Peck, Rebecca A Smith, Dharshana Padmakshan, Kate E Helmich, Heather C A Free, Seonghee Lee, Bronwen G Smith, Fachuang Lu, John C Sedbrook, Richard Sibout, John H Grabber, Troy M Runge, Kirankumar S Mysore, Philip J Harris, Laura E Bartley, John Ralph
Angiosperms represent most of the terrestrial plants and are the primary research focus for the conversion of biomass to liquid fuels and coproducts. Lignin limits our access to fibers and represents a large fraction of the chemical energy stored in plant cell walls. Recently, the incorporation of monolignol ferulates into lignin polymers was accomplished via the engineering of an exotic transferase into commercially relevant poplar. We report that various angiosperm species might have convergently evolved to natively produce lignins that incorporate monolignol ferulate conjugates...
October 2016: Science Advances
Sunkyu Yu, Xianji Piao, Jiho Hong, Namkyoo Park
Disorder plays a critical role in signal transport by controlling the correlation of a system, as demonstrated in various complex networks. In wave physics, disordered potentials suppress wave transport, because of their localized eigenstates, from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Although the variation of localization with tunable disorder has been intensively studied as a bridge between ordered and disordered media, the general trend of disorder-enhanced localization has remained unchanged, and the existence of complete delocalization in highly disordered potentials has not been explored...
October 2016: Science Advances
Emily K Law, Anieta M Sieuwerts, Kelly LaPara, Brandon Leonard, Gabriel J Starrett, Amy M Molan, Nuri A Temiz, Rachel Isaksson Vogel, Marion E Meijer-van Gelder, Fred C G J Sweep, Paul N Span, John A Foekens, John W M Martens, Douglas Yee, Reuben S Harris
Breast tumors often display extreme genetic heterogeneity characterized by hundreds of gross chromosomal aberrations and tens of thousands of somatic mutations. Tumor evolution is thought to be ongoing and driven by multiple mutagenic processes. A major outstanding question is whether primary tumors have preexisting mutations for therapy resistance or whether additional DNA damage and mutagenesis are necessary. Drug resistance is a key measure of tumor evolvability. If a resistance mutation preexists at the time of primary tumor presentation, then the intended therapy is likely to fail...
October 2016: Science Advances
Fayezeh Aarabi, Miyuki Kusajima, Takayuki Tohge, Tomokazu Konishi, Tamara Gigolashvili, Makiko Takamune, Yoko Sasazaki, Mutsumi Watanabe, Hideo Nakashita, Alisdair R Fernie, Kazuki Saito, Hideki Takahashi, Hans-Michael Hubberten, Rainer Hoefgen, Akiko Maruyama-Nakashita
Glucosinolates (GSLs) in the plant order of the Brassicales are sulfur-rich secondary metabolites that harbor antipathogenic and antiherbivory plant-protective functions and have medicinal properties, such as carcinopreventive and antibiotic activities. Plants repress GSL biosynthesis upon sulfur deficiency (-S); hence, field performance and medicinal quality are impaired by inadequate sulfate supply. The molecular mechanism that links -S to GSL biosynthesis has remained understudied. We report here the identification of the -S marker genes sulfur deficiency induced 1 (SDI1) and SDI2 acting as major repressors controlling GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis under -S condition...
October 2016: Science Advances
Yin-Ting Yeh, Yi Tang, Aswathy Sebastian, Archi Dasgupta, Nestor Perea-Lopez, Istvan Albert, Huaguang Lu, Mauricio Terrones, Si-Yang Zheng
Viral infectious diseases can erupt unpredictably, spread rapidly, and ravage mass populations. Although established methods, such as polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, and next-generation sequencing have been used to detect viruses, field samples with low virus count pose major challenges in virus surveillance and discovery. We report a unique carbon nanotube size-tunable enrichment microdevice (CNT-STEM) that efficiently enriches and concentrates viruses collected from field samples. The channel sidewall in the microdevice was made by growing arrays of vertically aligned nitrogen-doped multiwalled CNTs, where the intertubular distance between CNTs could be engineered in the range of 17 to 325 nm to accurately match the size of different viruses...
October 2016: Science Advances
Eric A Muller, Benjamin Pollard, Hans A Bechtel, Peter van Blerkom, Markus B Raschke
Molecular solids and polymers can form low-symmetry crystal structures that exhibit anisotropic electron and ion mobility in engineered devices or biological systems. The distribution of molecular orientation and disorder then controls the macroscopic material response, yet it is difficult to image with conventional techniques on the nanoscale. We demonstrated a new form of optical nanocrystallography that combines scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with both optical antenna and tip-selective infrared vibrational spectroscopy...
October 2016: Science Advances
Zhaoyang Lin, Anxiang Yin, Jun Mao, Yi Xia, Nicholas Kempf, Qiyuan He, Yiliu Wang, Chih-Yen Chen, Yanliang Zhang, Vidvuds Ozolins, Zhifeng Ren, Yu Huang, Xiangfeng Duan
Epitaxial heterostructures with precisely controlled composition and electronic modulation are of central importance for electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. In general, epitaxial material growth requires identical or nearly identical crystal structures with small misfit in lattice symmetry and parameters and is typically achieved by vapor-phase depositions in vacuum. We report a scalable solution-phase growth of symmetry-mismatched PbSe/Bi2Se3 epitaxial heterostructures by using two-dimensional (2D) Bi2Se3 nanoplates as soft templates...
October 2016: Science Advances
Alessandra Rossi, Karin J Ferrari, Andrea Piunti, SriGanesh Jammula, Fulvio Chiacchiera, Luca Mazzarella, Andrea Scelfo, Pier Giuseppe Pelicci, Diego Pasini
Leukemia is a complex heterogeneous disease often driven by the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins with different molecular and biochemical properties. Whereas several fusion proteins induce leukemogenesis by activating Hox gene expression (Hox-activating fusions), others impinge on different pathways that do not involve the activation of Hox genes (non-Hox-activating fusions). It has been postulated that one of the main oncogenic properties of the HOXA9 transcription factor is its ability to control the expression of the p16/p19 tumor suppressor locus (Cdkn2a), thereby compensating Polycomb-mediated repression, which is dispensable for leukemias induced by Hox-activating fusions...
October 2016: Science Advances
Lukmaan A Bawazer, Ciara S McNally, Christopher J Empson, William J Marchant, Tim P Comyn, Xize Niu, Soongwon Cho, Michael J McPherson, Bernard P Binks, Andrew deMello, Fiona C Meldrum
Although droplet-based systems are used in a wide range of technologies, opportunities for systematically customizing their interface chemistries remain relatively unexplored. This article describes a new microfluidic strategy for rapidly tailoring emulsion droplet compositions and properties. The approach uses a simple platform for screening arrays of droplet-based microfluidic devices and couples this with combinatorial selection of the droplet compositions. Through the application of genetic algorithms over multiple screening rounds, droplets with target properties can be rapidly generated...
October 2016: Science Advances
Nora Tischler, Mario Krenn, Robert Fickler, Xavier Vidal, Anton Zeilinger, Gabriel Molina-Terriza
The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies...
October 2016: Science Advances
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