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Science Advances

Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, David J Eldridge, Fernando T Maestre, Senani B Karunaratne, Pankaj Trivedi, Peter B Reich, Brajesh K Singh
The technical comment from Sanderman provides a unique opportunity to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms explaining the role of paleoclimate in the contemporary distribution of global soil C content, as reported in our article. Sanderman argues that the role of paleoclimate in predicting soil C content might be accounted for by using slowly changing soil properties as predictors. This is a key point that we highlighted in the supplementary materials of our article, which demonstrated, to the degree possible given available data, that soil properties alone cannot account for the unique portion of the variation in soil C explained by paleoclimate...
March 2018: Science Advances
Joshu J Mountjoy, Jamie D Howarth, Alan R Orpin, Philip M Barnes, David A Bowden, Ashley A Rowden, Alexandre C G Schimel, Caroline Holden, Huw J Horgan, Scott D Nodder, Jason R Patton, Geoffroy Lamarche, Matthew Gerstenberger, Aaron Micallef, Arne Pallentin, Tim Kane
Although the global flux of sediment and carbon from land to the coastal ocean is well known, the volume of material that reaches the deep ocean-the ultimate sink-and the mechanisms by which it is transferred are poorly documented. Using a globally unique data set of repeat seafloor measurements and samples, we show that the moment magnitude ( M w ) 7.8 November 2016 Kaikōura earthquake (New Zealand) triggered widespread landslides in a submarine canyon, causing a powerful "canyon flushing" event and turbidity current that traveled >680 km along one of the world's longest deep-sea channels...
March 2018: Science Advances
Elizabeth A MacDonald, Eric Donovan, Yukitoshi Nishimura, Nathan A Case, D Megan Gillies, Bea Gallardo-Lacourt, William E Archer, Emma L Spanswick, Notanee Bourassa, Martin Connors, Matthew Heavner, Brian Jackel, Burcu Kosar, David J Knudsen, Chris Ratzlaff, Ian Schofield
A glowing ribbon of purple light running east-west in the night sky has recently been observed by citizen scientists. This narrow, subauroral, visible structure, distinct from the traditional auroral oval, was largely undocumented in the scientific literature and little was known about its formation. Amateur photo sequences showed colors distinctly different from common types of aurora and occasionally indicated magnetic field-aligned substructures. Observations from the Swarm satellite as it crossed the arc have revealed an unusual level of electron temperature enhancement and density depletion, along with a strong westward ion flow, indicating that a pronounced subauroral ion drift (SAID) is associated with this structure...
March 2018: Science Advances
Ariel Talavera, Jelle Hendrix, Wim Versées, Dukas Jurėnas, Katleen Van Nerom, Niels Vandenberk, Ranjan Kumar Singh, Albert Konijnenberg, Steven De Gieter, Daniel Castro-Roa, Anders Barth, Henri De Greve, Frank Sobott, Johan Hofkens, Nikolay Zenkin, Remy Loris, Abel Garcia-Pino
Bacterial protein synthesis is intricately connected to metabolic rate. One of the ways in which bacteria respond to environmental stress is through posttranslational modifications of translation factors. Translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is methylated and phosphorylated in response to nutrient starvation upon entering stationary phase, and its phosphorylation is a crucial step in the pathway toward sporulation. We analyze how phosphorylation leads to inactivation of Escherichia coli EF-Tu. We provide structural and biophysical evidence that phosphorylation of EF-Tu at T382 acts as an efficient switch that turns off protein synthesis by decoupling nucleotide binding from the EF-Tu conformational cycle...
March 2018: Science Advances
Emily C White, Ashley Houlden, Allison J Bancroft, Kelly S Hayes, Marie Goldrick, Richard K Grencis, Ian S Roberts
Intestinal dwelling parasites have evolved closely with the complex intestinal microbiota of their host, but the significance of the host microbiota for metazoan pathogens and the role of their own intestinal microbiota are still not fully known. We have found that the parasitic nematode Trichuris muris acquired a distinct intestinal microbiota from its host, which was required for nematode fitness. Infection of germ-free mice and mice monocolonized with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron demonstrated that successful T...
March 2018: Science Advances
Gen Murakami, Mitsuhiro Edamura, Tomonori Furukawa, Hideya Kawasaki, Isao Kosugi, Atsuo Fukuda, Toshihide Iwashita, Daiichiro Nakahara
Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) is an important immune protein that is expressed in various brain regions, with its deficiency leading to extensive synaptic transmission that results in learning and memory deficits. Although MHCI is highly expressed in dopaminergic neurons, its role in these neurons has not been examined. We show that MHCI expressed in dopaminergic neurons plays a key role in suppressing reward-seeking behavior. In wild-type mice, cocaine self-administration caused persistent reduction of MHCI specifically in dopaminergic neurons, which was accompanied by enhanced glutamatergic synaptic transmission and relapse to cocaine seeking...
March 2018: Science Advances
Bryce E Hughes
Using a national longitudinal survey data set from the Higher Education Research Institute, this study tested whether students who identified as a sexual minority (for example, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer) were more or less likely to persist after 4 years in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, as opposed to switching to a non-STEM program, compared to their heterosexual peers. A multilevel regression model controlling for various experiences and characteristics previously determined to predict retention in STEM demonstrated that, net of these variables, sexual minority students were 8% less likely to be retained in STEM compared to switching into a non-STEM program...
March 2018: Science Advances
Jean-Nicolas Audet, Lima Kayello, Simon Ducatez, Sara Perillo, Laure Cauchard, Jason T Howard, Lauren A O'Connell, Erich D Jarvis, Louis Lefebvre
Problem solving and innovation are key components of intelligence. We compare wild-caught individuals from two species that are close relatives of Darwin's finches, the innovative Loxigilla barbadensis , and its most closely related species in Barbados, the conservative Tiaris bicolor . We found an all-or-none difference in the problem-solving capacity of the two species. Brain RNA sequencing analyses revealed interspecific differences in genes related to neuronal and synaptic plasticity in the intrapallial neural populations (mesopallium and nidopallium), especially in the nidopallium caudolaterale, a structure functionally analogous to the mammalian prefrontal cortex...
March 2018: Science Advances
Andrea Raponi, Maria Cristina De Sanctis, Alessandro Frigeri, Eleonora Ammannito, Mauro Ciarniello, Michelangelo Formisano, Jean-Philippe Combe, Gianfranco Magni, Federico Tosi, Filippo Giacomo Carrozzo, Sergio Fonte, Marco Giardino, Steven P Joy, Carol A Polanskey, Marc D Rayman, Fabrizio Capaccioni, Maria Teresa Capria, Andrea Longobardo, Ernesto Palomba, Francesca Zambon, Carol A Raymond, Christopher T Russell
The dwarf planet Ceres is known to host a considerable amount of water in its interior, and areas of water ice were detected by the Dawn spacecraft on its surface. Moreover, sporadic water and hydroxyl emissions have been observed from space telescopes. We report the detection of water ice in a mid-latitude crater and its unexpected variation with time. The Dawn spectrometer data show a change of water ice signatures over a period of 6 months, which is well modeled as ~2-km2 increase of water ice. The observed increase, coupled with Ceres' orbital parameters, points to an ongoing process that seems correlated with solar flux...
March 2018: Science Advances
Vincent Clesi, Mohamed Ali Bouhifd, Nathalie Bolfan-Casanova, Geeth Manthilake, Federica Schiavi, Caroline Raepsaet, Hélène Bureau, Hicham Khodja, Denis Andrault
Hydrogen has been thought to be an important light element in Earth's core due to possible siderophile behavior during core-mantle segregation. We reproduced planetary differentiation conditions using hydrogen contents of 450 to 1500 parts per million (ppm) in the silicate phase, pressures of 5 to 20 GPa, oxygen fugacity varying within IW-3.7 and IW-0.2 (0.2 to 3.7 log units lower than iron-wüstite buffer), and Fe alloys typical of planetary cores. We report hydrogen metal-silicate partition coefficients of ~2 × 10-1 , up to two orders of magnitude lower than reported previously, and indicative of lithophile behavior...
March 2018: Science Advances
Amy E Hessl, Kevin J Anchukaitis, Casey Jelsema, Benjamin Cook, Oyunsanaa Byambasuren, Caroline Leland, Baatarbileg Nachin, Neil Pederson, Hanqin Tian, Laia Andreu Hayles
The severity of recent droughts in semiarid regions is increasingly attributed to anthropogenic climate change, but it is unclear whether these moisture anomalies exceed those of the past and how past variability compares to future projections. On the Mongolian Plateau, a recent decade-long drought that exceeded the variability in the instrumental record was associated with economic, social, and environmental change. We evaluate this drought using an annual reconstruction of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) spanning the last 2060 years in concert with simulations of past and future drought through the year 2100 CE...
March 2018: Science Advances
Filippo Giacomo Carrozzo, Maria Cristina De Sanctis, Andrea Raponi, Eleonora Ammannito, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Bethany L Ehlmann, Simone Marchi, Nathaniel Stein, Mauro Ciarniello, Federico Tosi, Fabrizio Capaccioni, Maria Teresa Capria, Sergio Fonte, Michelangelo Formisano, Alessandro Frigeri, Marco Giardino, Andrea Longobardo, Gianfranco Magni, Ernesto Palomba, Francesca Zambon, Carol A Raymond, Christopher T Russell
Different carbonates have been detected on Ceres, and their abundance and spatial distribution have been mapped using a visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR), the Dawn imaging spectrometer. Carbonates are abundant and ubiquitous across the surface, but variations in the strength and position of infrared spectral absorptions indicate variations in the composition and amount of these minerals. Mg-Ca carbonates are detected all over the surface, but localized areas show Na carbonates, such as natrite (Na2 CO3 ) and hydrated Na carbonates (for example, Na2 CO3 ·H2 O)...
March 2018: Science Advances
Jonathan Sanderman
Delgado-Baquerizo et al . ( Science Advances , 12 April 2017, e1602008) use statistical correlations to infer that paleoclimate (6000 to 22,000 years ago) is a more important driver of current soil organic carbon stocks than the current-day climate. On the other hand, a wealth of radiocarbon measurements indicates that the organic carbon in most topsoils is only a few decades to perhaps a few centuries old. These seemingly incongruous results can perhaps be reconciled by considering that the long-term pedogenic development of a soil strongly influences the physiochemical properties, which lead to stabilization of new carbon entering that soil regardless of current climate...
March 2018: Science Advances
Peng-Fei Wang, Hu-Rong Yao, Xin-Yu Liu, Ya-Xia Yin, Jie-Nan Zhang, Yuren Wen, Xiqian Yu, Lin Gu, Yu-Guo Guo
As one of the most fascinating cathode candidates for Na-ion batteries (NIBs), P2-type Na layered oxides usually exhibit various single-phase domains accompanied by different Na+ /vacancy-ordered superstructures, depending on the Na concentration when explored in a limited electrochemical window. Therefore, their Na+ kinetics and cycling stability at high rates are subjected to these superstructures, incurring obvious voltage plateaus in the electrochemical profiles and insufficient battery performance as cathode materials for NIBs...
March 2018: Science Advances
Tian Li, Jianwei Song, Xinpeng Zhao, Zhi Yang, Glenn Pastel, Shaomao Xu, Chao Jia, Jiaqi Dai, Chaoji Chen, Amy Gong, Feng Jiang, Yonggang Yao, Tianzhu Fan, Bao Yang, Lars Wågberg, Ronggui Yang, Liangbing Hu
There has been a growing interest in thermal management materials due to the prevailing energy challenges and unfulfilled needs for thermal insulation applications. We demonstrate the exceptional thermal management capabilities of a large-scale, hierarchal alignment of cellulose nanofibrils directly fabricated from wood, hereafter referred to as nanowood. Nanowood exhibits anisotropic thermal properties with an extremely low thermal conductivity of 0.03 W/m·K in the transverse direction (perpendicular to the nanofibrils) and approximately two times higher thermal conductivity of 0...
March 2018: Science Advances
Hiang Kwee Lee, Charlynn Sher Lin Koh, Yih Hong Lee, Chong Liu, In Yee Phang, Xuemei Han, Chia-Kuang Tsung, Xing Yi Ling
Electrochemical nitrogen-to-ammonia fixation is emerging as a sustainable strategy to tackle the hydrogen- and energy-intensive operations by Haber-Bosch process for ammonia production. However, current electrochemical nitrogen reduction reaction (NRR) progress is impeded by overwhelming competition from the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across all traditional NRR catalysts and the requirement for elevated temperature/pressure. We achieve both excellent NRR selectivity (~90%) and a significant boost to Faradic efficiency by 10 percentage points even at ambient operations by coating a superhydrophobic metal-organic framework (MOF) layer over the NRR electrocatalyst...
March 2018: Science Advances
Pascal Audet, Andrew J Schaeffer
At subduction zones, the deep seismogenic transition from a frictionally locked to steady sliding interface is thought to primarily reflect changes in rheology and fluid pressure and is generally located offshore. The development of fluid pressures within a seismic low-velocity layer (LVL) remains poorly constrained due to the scarcity of dense, continuous onshore-offshore broadband seismic arrays. We image the subducting Juan de Fuca oceanic plate in northern Cascadia using onshore-offshore teleseismic data and find that the signature of the LVL does not extend into the locked zone...
March 2018: Science Advances
Junu Bae, Zijian Zhou, Thomas Theis, Warren S Warren, Qiu Wang
Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance (HP-MR) is a powerful, sensitive, and noninvasive approach to visualize molecular structure, function, and dynamics in vitro and in vivo. Current applications of HP-MR mostly rely on hyperpolarization of target compounds in dedicated hyperpolarizers because biomolecules can typically not be hyperpolarized directly in vivo. The injected hyperpolarized probes often undergo multiple metabolic pathways in living systems, and it remains challenging to localize and identify specific targets with high chemical selectivity...
March 2018: Science Advances
Hyosung An, Touseef Habib, Smit Shah, Huili Gao, Miladin Radovic, Micah J Green, Jodie L Lutkenhaus
Stretchable, bendable, and foldable conductive coatings are crucial for wearable electronics and biometric sensors. These coatings should maintain functionality while simultaneously interfacing with different types of surfaces undergoing mechanical deformation. MXene sheets as conductive two-dimensional nanomaterials are promising for this purpose, but it is still extremely difficult to form surface-agnostic MXene coatings that can withstand extreme mechanical deformation. We report on conductive and conformal MXene multilayer coatings that can undergo large-scale mechanical deformation while maintaining a conductivity as high as 2000 S/m...
March 2018: Science Advances
Zhiyi Liu, Dimitra Pouli, Carlo A Alonzo, Antonio Varone, Sevasti Karaliota, Kyle P Quinn, Karl Münger, Katia P Karalis, Irene Georgakoudi
Monitoring subcellular functional and structural changes associated with metabolism is essential for understanding healthy tissue development and the progression of numerous diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Unfortunately, established methods for this purpose either are destructive or require the use of exogenous agents. Recent work has highlighted the potential of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) as a method to monitor subtle metabolic changes; however, mechanistic understanding of the connections between the detected optical signal and the underlying metabolic pathways has been lacking...
March 2018: Science Advances
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