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Nature Plants

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909302/kinase-signalling-tanning-with-myb75
#1
Guillaume Tena
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909301/genetic-architecture-and-evolution-of-the-s-locus-supergene-in-primula-vulgaris
#2
Jinhong Li, Jonathan M Cocker, Jonathan Wright, Margaret A Webster, Mark McMullan, Sarah Dyer, David Swarbreck, Mario Caccamo, Cock van Oosterhout, Philip M Gilmartin
Darwin's studies on heterostyly in Primula described two floral morphs, pin and thrum, with reciprocal anther and stigma heights that promote insect-mediated cross-pollination. This key innovation evolved independently in several angiosperm families. Subsequent studies on heterostyly in Primula contributed to the foundation of modern genetic theory and the neo-Darwinian synthesis. The established genetic model for Primula heterostyly involves a diallelic S locus comprising several genes, with rare recombination events that result in self-fertile homostyle flowers with anthers and stigma at the same height...
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909300/cyanobacterial-photoprotection-by-the-orange-carotenoid-protein
#3
REVIEW
Diana Kirilovsky, Cheryl A Kerfeld
In photosynthetic organisms, the production of dangerous oxygen species is stimulated under high irradiance. To cope with this stress, these organisms have evolved photoprotective mechanisms. One type of mechanism functions to decrease the energy arriving at the photochemical centres by increasing thermal dissipation at the level of antennae. In cyanobacteria, the trigger for this mechanism is the photoactivation of a soluble carotenoid protein, the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which is a structurally and functionally modular protein...
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909299/pest-control-peppers-trap-worms
#4
Chris Surridge
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909298/vernalization-memorizing-the-cold
#5
Lei Lei
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909297/seasonal-cheer
#6
EDITORIAL
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909296/reproduction-the-genetic-basis-of-heterostyly
#7
Bruce McClure
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909295/small-interfering-rna-hybrid-revision
#8
Jun Lyu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909294/giving-fruit-a-nutritional-boost
#9
Karl Gruber
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909293/major-losses-of-nutrients-following-a-severe-drought-in-a-boreal-forest
#10
Daniel Houle, Geneviève Lajoie, Louis Duchesne
Because of global warming, the frequency and severity of droughts are expected to increase, which will have an impact on forest ecosystem health worldwide(1). Although the impact of drought on tree growth and mortality is being increasingly documented(2-4), very little is known about the impact on nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Here, based on long-term monitoring data, we report nutrient fluxes in a boreal forest before, during and following a severe drought in July 2012. During and shortly after the drought, we observed high throughfall (rain collected below the canopy) concentrations of nutrient base cations (potassium, calcium and magnesium), chlorine, phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), differing by one to two orders of magnitude relative to the long-term normal, and resulting in important canopy losses...
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892943/temperature-responses-of-rubisco-from-paniceae-grasses-provide-opportunities-for-improving-c3-photosynthesis
#11
Robert E Sharwood, Oula Ghannoum, Maxim V Kapralov, Laura H Gunn, Spencer M Whitney
Enhancing the catalytic properties of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco is a target for improving agricultural crop productivity. Here, we reveal extensive diversity in the kinetic response between 10 and 37 °C by Rubisco from C3 and C4 species within the grass tribe Paniceae. The CO2 fixation rate (kcatc) for Rubisco from the C4 grasses with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) photosynthetic pathways was twofold greater than the kcatc of Rubisco from NAD-ME species across all temperatures...
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892927/photosynthesis-mining-grasses-for-a-better-rubisco
#12
Rowan F Sage
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892924/the-pattern-recognition-receptor-core-of-solanaceae-detects-bacterial-cold-shock-protein
#13
Lei Wang, Markus Albert, Elias Einig, Ursula Fürst, Damaris Krust, Georg Felix
Plants and animals recognize microbial invaders by detecting microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) by cell surface receptors. Many plant species of the Solanaceae family detect the highly conserved nucleic acid binding motif RNP-1 of bacterial cold-shock proteins (CSPs), represented by the peptide csp22, as a MAMP. Here, we exploited the natural variation in csp22 perception observed between cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Solanum pennellii to map and identify the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase CORE (cold shock protein receptor) of tomato as the specific, high-affinity receptor site for csp22...
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892923/origin-and-function-of-stomata-in-the-moss-physcomitrella-patens
#14
Caspar C Chater, Robert S Caine, Marta Tomek, Simon Wallace, Yasuko Kamisugi, Andrew C Cuming, Daniel Lang, Cora A MacAlister, Stuart Casson, Dominique C Bergmann, Eva L Decker, Wolfgang Frank, Julie E Gray, Andrew Fleming, Ralf Reski, David J Beerling
Stomata are microscopic valves on plant surfaces that originated over 400 million years (Myr) ago and facilitated the greening of Earth's continents by permitting efficient shoot-atmosphere gas exchange and plant hydration(1). However, the core genetic machinery regulating stomatal development in non-vascular land plants is poorly understood(2-4) and their function has remained a matter of debate for a century(5). Here, we show that genes encoding the two basic helix-loop-helix proteins PpSMF1 (SPEECH, MUTE and FAMA-like) and PpSCREAM1 (SCRM1) in the moss Physcomitrella patens are orthologous to transcriptional regulators of stomatal development in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana and essential for stomata formation in moss...
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892922/convergence-and-divergence-of-bitterness-biosynthesis-and-regulation-in-cucurbitaceae
#15
Yuan Zhou, Yongshuo Ma, Jianguo Zeng, Lixin Duan, Xiaofeng Xue, Huaisong Wang, Tao Lin, Zhiqiang Liu, Kewu Zeng, Yang Zhong, Shu Zhang, Qun Hu, Min Liu, Huimin Zhang, James Reed, Tessa Moses, Xinyan Liu, Peng Huang, Zhixing Qing, Xiubin Liu, Pengfei Tu, Hanhui Kuang, Zhonghua Zhang, Anne Osbourn, Dae-Kyun Ro, Yi Shang, Sanwen Huang
Differentiation of secondary metabolite profiles in closely related plant species provides clues for unravelling biosynthetic pathways and regulatory circuits, an area that is still underinvestigated. Cucurbitacins, a group of bitter and highly oxygenated tetracyclic triterpenes, are mainly produced by the plant family Cucurbitaceae. These compounds have similar structures, but differ in their antitumour activities and ecophysiological roles. By comparative analyses of the genomes of cucumber, melon and watermelon, we uncovered conserved syntenic loci encoding metabolic genes for distinct cucurbitacins...
November 28, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869799/transcript-protein-and-metabolite-temporal-dynamics-in-the-cam-plant-agave
#16
Paul E Abraham, Hengfu Yin, Anne M Borland, Deborah Weighill, Sung Don Lim, Henrique Cestari De Paoli, Nancy Engle, Piet C Jones, Ryan Agh, David J Weston, Stan D Wullschleger, Timothy Tschaplinski, Daniel Jacobson, John C Cushman, Robert L Hettich, Gerald A Tuskan, Xiaohan Yang
Already a proven mechanism for drought resilience, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized type of photosynthesis that maximizes water-use efficiency by means of an inverse (compared to C3 and C4 photosynthesis) day/night pattern of stomatal closure/opening to shift CO2 uptake to the night, when evapotranspiration rates are low. A systems-level understanding of temporal molecular and metabolic controls is needed to define the cellular behaviour underpinning CAM. Here, we report high-resolution temporal behaviours of transcript, protein and metabolite abundances across a CAM diel cycle and, where applicable, compare the observations to the well-established C3 model plant Arabidopsis...
November 21, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869791/corrigendum-endogenous-arabidopsis-messenger-rnas-transported-to-distant-tissues
#17
Christoph J Thieme, Monica Rojas-Triana, Ewelina Stecyk, Christian Schudoma, Wenna Zhang, Lei Yang, Miguel Miñambres, Dirk Walther, Waltraud X Schulze, Javier Paz-Ares, Wolf-Rüdiger Scheible, Friedrich Kragler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 21, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869788/systems-biology-a-new-cam-era
#18
Alisdair R Fernie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 21, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869787/obligate-plant-farming-by-a-specialized-ant
#19
Guillaume Chomicki, Susanne S Renner
Many epiphytic plants have associated with ants to gain nutrients. Here, we report a novel type of ant-plant symbiosis in Fiji where one ant species actively and exclusively plants the seeds and fertilizes the seedlings of six species of Squamellaria (Rubiaceae). Comparison with related facultative ant plants suggests that such farming plays a key role in mutualism stability by mitigating the critical re-establishment step.
November 21, 2016: Nature Plants
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869786/a-role-for-leucoanthocyanidin-reductase-in-the-extension-of-proanthocyanidins
#20
Chenggang Liu, Xiaoqiang Wang, Vladimir Shulaev, Richard A Dixon
Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are the second most abundant plant polyphenolic compounds after lignin. PAs affect taste, mouth feel and astringency of many fruits, wines and beverages(1,2), have been associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease(3-5), can improve nutrition and prevent bloat in ruminant animals(6) and enhance soil nitrogen retention(7). PAs are oligomers and polymers of flavan-3-ols, primarily (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin, but the mechanism by which the monomers polymerize and become insoluble is currently unknown...
November 21, 2016: Nature Plants
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