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Current Opinion in Insect Science

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602243/editorial-overview-current-investigations-of-environmental-drivers-and-community-interactions-that-influence-biological-control
#1
EDITORIAL
Mary M Gardiner, James D Harwood
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602242/editorial-overview-ecology-the-chemical-ecology-of-human-disease-transmission-by-mosquito-vectors
#2
EDITORIAL
Mark C Mescher, Consuelo M De Moraes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602241/incorporating-biological-control-into-ipm-decision-making
#3
REVIEW
Kristopher L Giles, Brian P McCornack, Tom A Royer, Norman C Elliott
Of the many ways biological control can be incorporated into Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, natural enemy thresholds are arguably most easily adopted by stakeholders. Integration of natural enemy thresholds into IPM programs requires ecological and cost/benefit crop production data, threshold model validation, and an understanding of the socioeconomic factors that influence stakeholder decisions about biological control. These thresholds are more likely to be utilized by stakeholders when integrated into dynamic web-based IPM decision support systems that summarize pest management data and push site-specific biological control management recommendations to decision-makers...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602240/olfactory-learning-and-chemical-ecology-of-olfaction-in-disease-vector-mosquitoes-a-life-history-perspective
#4
REVIEW
Eleanor K Lutz, Chloé Lahondère, Clément Vinauger, Jeffrey A Riffell
Mosquitoes transmit many debilitating diseases including malaria, dengue and Zika. Odors mediate behaviors that directly impact disease transmission (blood-feeding) as well as life history events that contribute to mosquito survival and fitness (mating and oviposition, nectar foraging, larval foraging and predator avoidance). In addition to innate olfaction-mediated behaviors, mosquitoes rely on olfactory experience throughout their life to inform advantageous choices in many of these important behaviors. Previous reviews have addressed either the chemical ecology of mosquitoes, or olfactory-driven behaviors including host-feeding or oviposition...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602239/effects-of-malaria-infection-on-mosquito-olfaction-and-behavior-extrapolating-data-to-the-field
#5
REVIEW
Nina M Stanczyk, Mark C Mescher, Consuelo M De Moraes
Vector-borne pathogens have been shown to influence behavioral and other traits of their hosts and vectors across multiple systems, frequently in ways that enhance transmission. In malaria pathosystems, Plasmodium parasites have been reported to alter mosquito physiology, fitness and host-seeking behavior. Such effects on vector behavior have obvious medical relevance given their potential to influence disease transmission. However, most studies detailing these effects have faced methodological limitations, including experiments limited to laboratory settings with model vector/pathogen systems...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602238/chemical-signaling-in-mosquito-host-interactions-the-role-of-human-skin-microbiota
#6
REVIEW
Willem Takken, Niels O Verhulst
Anthropophilic mosquitoes use host-derived volatile compounds for host seeking. Recently it has become evident that many of these compounds are of microbial origin. Host seeking of mosquitoes is, therefore, a tritrophic relationship and suggests co-evolution between blood hosts and their microbial community to the benefit of the mosquito. Chemical analysis of bacterial headspace resulted in discovery of several compounds that make up the attractive blend to which mosquitoes respond. Future studies should determine which host factors shape the skin microbial community and attractive volatiles produced...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602237/spatial-and-temporal-changes-in-the-abundance-and-compostion-of-ladybird-coleoptera-coccinellidae-communities
#7
REVIEW
Alois Honek, Anthony Fg Dixon, Antonio O Soares, Jiri Skuhrovec, Zdenka Martinkova
Because of their services to agriculture most ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are intensively studied predators of mainly phytophagous pests. The study of the long-term variation in the composition of their communities was stimulated by recent dramatic changes in the abundance of some species. We review and evaluate possible effects of the main causes cited in the literature. Agricultural and habitat changes (particularly urbanization) affect coccinellid abundance, both negatively and positively. In the temperate zone dominant species occur most frequently associated with abundant prey populations on crops, weeds and planted stands of trees resulting from human activity...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602236/scaling-up-our-understanding-of-non-consumptive-effects-in-insect-systems
#8
REVIEW
Sara L Hermann, Douglas A Landis
Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey is an important topic in insect ecology with potential applications for pest management. NCEs are changes in prey behavior and physiology that aid in predation avoidance. While NCEs can have positive outcomes for prey survival there may also be negative consequences including increased stress and reduced growth. These effects can cascade through trophic systems influencing ecosystem function. Most NCEs have been studied at small spatial and temporal scales...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602235/influence-of-heavy-metal-contamination-on-urban-natural-enemies-and-biological-control
#9
REVIEW
Mary M Gardiner, James D Harwood
Urban agriculture is increasing worldwide. A history of contamination within urban landscapes may negatively impact the biota necessary for sustainable crop production, including arthropod natural enemies. This investigation revealed that heavy metal contamination can influence the composition of natural enemy communities and exposure can have reproductive, developmental, immunological and behavioral impacts on predators and parasitoids. Natural enemies exposed to heavy metals typically live shorter lives, take longer to develop and exhibit a reduced reproductive potential...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602234/climate-change-and-biological-control-the-consequences-of-increasing-temperatures-on-host-parasitoid-interactions
#10
REVIEW
Michael J Furlong, Myron P Zalucki
The relative thermal requirements and tolerances of hymenopteran parasitoids and their hosts were investigated based on published data. The optimal temperature (Topt) for development of parasitoids was significantly lower than that for their hosts. Given the limited plasticity of insect responses to high temperatures and the proximity of Topt to critical thermal maxima, this suggests that host-parasitoid interactions could be negatively affected by increasing global temperatures. A modelling study of the interactions between the diamondback moth and its parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum in Australia indicated that predicted temperature increases will have a greater negative impact on the distribution of the parasitoid than on its host and that they could lead to its exclusion from some agricultural regions where it is currently important...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602233/immunity-host-physiology-and-behaviour-in-infected-vectors
#11
REVIEW
Courtney C Murdock, Shirley Luckhart, Lauren J Cator
When infection alters host behaviour such that the pathogen benefits, the behaviour is termed a manipulation. There are several examples of this fascinating phenomenon in many different systems. Vector-borne diseases are no exception. In some instances, as the term implies, pathogens directly interfere with host processes to control behaviour. However, host response to infection and host physiology are likely to play important roles in these phenotypes. We highlight the importance of considering host response and physiology from recent work on altered host-seeking in malaria parasite-infected mosquitoes and argue that this general approach will provide useful insights across vector-borne disease systems...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602232/the-neurobiology-of-gustation-in-insect-disease-vectors-progress-and-potential
#12
REVIEW
Richard Benton
For insect vectors of human diseases, mealtimes are a key moment of infection. Understanding how and when such species decide on what to feed is both an interesting problem in sensory neurobiology and a source of information for intervention of these behaviors to control spread of infectious agents. Here I review the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of gustation in insect disease vectors, covering blood-feeders as well as scavengers that spread pathogens indirectly. I also consider how these behaviors are modulated over short and long timescales, and describe efforts to artificially modulate them...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602231/the-impacts-of-spatial-and-temporal-complexity-across-landscapes-on-biological-control-a-review
#13
REVIEW
Abigail L Cohen, David W Crowder
Biological control is affected by the composition of landscapes surrounding agricultural fields. Natural enemy communities are typically more diverse, and effective at providing biological control services, in complex compared to simple landscapes. However, the use of simple metrics to characterize landscapes, such as the proportion of agricultural habitat, obscures the mechanisms by which landscapes affect biological control. Studies that evaluate the overall complexity of agricultural landscapes, and their temporal variability, allow for a greater mechanistic understanding of the impacts of landscape composition on biological control...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602230/relationships-between-natural-enemy-diversity-and-biological-control
#14
REVIEW
Mattias Jonsson, Riikka Kaartinen, Cory S Straub
Natural enemy diversity generally strengthens biological control, but individual studies have found everything from positive to negative effects. We discuss the factors that promote these different outcomes. We argue that a trait-based approach is helpful to improve our understanding of the relationship between enemy diversity and biological control, and suggest that enemy diversity is likely to be particularly important as an insurance against effects of climate change. Future research should increase the scale and ecological realism of enemy diversity studies, and consider both the strength and stability of biological control...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428935/genetic-analysis-of-mosquito-detection-of-humans
#15
Joshua I Raji, Matthew DeGennaro
Mosquitoes detect the presence of humans by integrating chemosensory, thermal, and visual cues. Among these, odors are crucial for mosquito host detection. Insects have evolved a diverse repertoire of receptors to detect their plant and animal hosts. Genetic analysis of these receptors in Drosophila has set the stage for similar studies in mosquitoes. The diversity of the cues involved in mosquito host-seeking has made designing behavioral control strategies a challenge. The sensory receptors that are most important for mosquito detection of humans can now be determined using genome editing...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521950/editorial-overview-development-and-regulation-the-diverse-traits-that-have-facilitated-the-successful-radiation-of-insects
#16
EDITORIAL
Yoshinori Tomoyasu, Haruhiko Fujiwara
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521949/editorial-overview-insect-genomics
#17
EDITORIAL
David L Denlinger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521948/genomics-of-interaction-between-the-brown-planthopper-and-rice
#18
REVIEW
Shengli Jing, Yan Zhao, Bo Du, Rongzhi Chen, Lili Zhu, Guangcun He
Rice (Oryza sativa L.) and the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)) form a model system for dissection of the mechanism of interaction between insect pest and crop. In this review, we focus on the genomics of BPH-rice interaction. On the side of rice, a number of BPH-resistance genes have been identified genetically. Thirteen of these genes have been cloned which shed a light on the molecular basis of the interaction. On the aspect of BPH, a lot of salivary proteins have been identified using transcriptome and proteome techniques...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521947/ultrabithorax-and-the-evolution-of-insect-forewing-hindwing-differentiation
#19
REVIEW
Yoshinori Tomoyasu
Decades have passed since the stunning four-winged phenotype of the Drosophila Ultrabithorax (Ubx) mutant was reported, and accumulating knowledge obtained from studies on Ubx in Drosophila has provided a framework to investigate the role of Ubx during insect wing evolution. With several new insights emerging from recent studies in non-Drosophila insects, along with the outcomes of genomic studies focused on identifying Ubx targets, it appears to be an appropriate time to revisit the Drosophila paradigm regarding insect wing development and evolution...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521946/genomics-of-the-asian-rice-gall-midge-and-its-interactions-with-rice
#20
REVIEW
Deepak Kumar Sinha, Isha Atray, Ruchi Agarrwal, Jagadish Sanmallappa Bentur, Suresh Nair
Understanding virulence and manipulative strategies of gall formers will reveal new facets of plant defense and insect counter defense. Among the gall midges, the Asian rice gall midge (AGM) has emerged as a model for studies on plant-insect interactions. Data from several genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics studies have revealed diverse strategies adopted by AGM to successfully invade the host while overcoming its defense. Adaptive skills of AGM transcend from its genomic and transcriptomic make-up...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
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