journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Current Opinion in Insect Science

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129291/editorial-overview-molecular-physiology-insect-nutrition-beyond-energy
#1
EDITORIAL
Matthew Piper, Carlos Ribeiro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129290/editorial-overview-global-change-biology-everything-connects-to-everything-else
#2
EDITORIAL
Brandon T Barton, Jason P Harmon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129289/craving-for-the-future-the-brain-as-a-nutritional-prediction-system
#3
REVIEW
Samuel J Walker, Dennis Goldschmidt, Carlos Ribeiro
In the last decades, predictive coding has emerged as an important framework for understanding how the brain processes information. It states that the brain is constantly inferring and predicting sensory data from statistical regularities in its environment. While this framework has been largely applied to sensory processing and motor control, we argue here that it could also serve as framework for a better understanding of how animals regulate nutrient homeostasis. Mechanisms that underlie nutrient homeostasis are commonly described in terms of negative feedback control, which compares current states with a reference point, called setpoint, and counteracts any mismatches...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129288/overturning-dogma-tolerance-of-insects-to-mixed-sterol-diets-is-not-universal
#4
REVIEW
Spencer T Behmer
Insects cannot synthesize sterols de novo, but like all eukaryotes they use them as cell membrane inserts where they influence membrane fluidity and rigidity. They also use a small amount for metabolic purposes, most notably as essential precursors for steroid hormones. It has been a long-held view that most insects require a small amount of specific sterol (often cholesterol) for metabolic purposes, but for membrane purposes (where the bulk of sterols are used) specificity in sterol structure was less important...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129287/can-agricultural-practices-that-mitigate-or-improve-crop-resilience-to-climate-change-also-manage-crop-pests
#5
REVIEW
Ebony G Murrell
Sustainable agricultural practices that are promoted for mitigating climate change have the potential to also improve pest management. The author highlights recent studies that demonstrate effects of climate-mitigating agricultural practices on arthropod pests and predators in agronomic cropping systems. Promising practices for suppressing pests and/or improving biological control include: plant species diversification, especially via the addition of perennial species; cover cropping; tillage practices that retain crop residue; application of organic fertilizers such as compost and manure; and water management practices such as irrigation and sustainable rice intensification...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129286/global-change-effects-on-plant-insect-interactions-the-role-of-phytochemistry
#6
REVIEW
Mary A Jamieson, Laura A Burkle, Jessamyn S Manson, Justin B Runyon, Amy M Trowbridge, Joseph Zientek
Natural and managed ecosystems are undergoing rapid environmental change due to a growing human population and associated increases in industrial and agricultural activity. Global environmental change directly and indirectly impacts insect herbivores and pollinators. In this review, we highlight recent research examining how environmental change factors affect plant chemistry and, in turn, ecological interactions among plants, herbivores, and pollinators. Recent studies reveal the complex nature of understanding global change effects on plant secondary metabolites and plant-insect interactions...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129285/mass-mortality-events-and-the-role-of-necrophagous-invertebrates
#7
REVIEW
Jeffery K Tomberlin, Brandon T Barton, Marcus A Lashley, Heather R Jordan
Scale is important in understanding and applying concepts in ecology. Historically, the mechanisms regulating necrophagous arthropod community structure have been well explored on a single vertebrate carcass. However, practically nothing is known of whether such findings can be extrapolated to cases where large numbers of carcasses have been introduced into an ecosystem at a single time point. With the increasing incidences of mass mortality events (MMEs), understanding how scale effects community assembly of necrophagous insects and the resulting bottom-up or top-down effects on the impacted ecosystem are of utmost importance...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129284/the-b-vitamin-nutrition-of-insects-the-contributions-of-diet-microbiome-and-horizontally-acquired-genes
#8
REVIEW
Angela E Douglas
Insects generally cannot synthesize eight B vitamins that function as co-enzymes in various required enzymatic reactions. Most insects derive their B vitamin requirements from the diet, microbial symbionts, or a combination of these complementary sources. Exceptionally, the genomes of a few insects bear genes in vitamin B5 (pantothenate) and B7 (biotin) synthesis, horizontally acquired from bacteria. Biomarkers of B vitamin deficiency (e.g. vitamin titers, activity of vitamin-dependent enzymes) offer routes to investigate the incidence and the physiological and fitness consequences of B vitamin deficiency in laboratory and field populations of insects...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129283/biological-control-agents-in-the-anthropocene-current-risks-and-future-options
#9
REVIEW
Jessa H Thurman, David W Crowder, Tobin D Northfield
Global climate change is often expected to disrupt biological control. Predicting the effects of climate change on biological control, and identifying natural enemies that will thrive in future climate scenarios, is thus essential to ensure agricultural sustainability. To promote biological control under climate change, land managers should prioritise the conservation of natural enemy diversity to ensure some effective natural enemies are always present despite often-unpredictable climate scenarios. In addition, ecophysiological and habitat domain models should be combined to predict climate change-induced shifts in predation by diverse predator communities...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129282/using-plant-nutrient-landscapes-to-assess-anthropocene-effects-on-insect-herbivores
#10
REVIEW
Paul A Lenhart
Global climate change will dramatically affect insect herbivores through changes in plant quality. Linking how multiple climate factors affect plant macronutrient content may be the most accurate way to understand the response of insect herbivores. Studies should embrace the complexity of interacting climate factors in natural systems and characterize shifts in multidimensional plant nutrient landscapes. This nutrient landscape simplifies interpretation of climate effects, although selection of appropriate currencies, scale, and interactions with allelochemicals present challenges...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129281/the-essential-roles-of-metal-ions-in-insect-homeostasis-and-physiology
#11
REVIEW
Julian At Dow
Metal ions play distinct roles in living organisms, including insects. Some, like sodium and potassium, are central players in osmoregulation and 'blood and guts' transport physiology, and have been implicated in cold adaptation. Calcium is a key player as a second messenger, and as a structural element. Other metals, particularly those with multiple redox states, can be cofactors in many metalloenzymes, but can contribute to toxic oxidative stress on the organism in excess. This short review selects some examples where classical knowledge has been supplemented with recent advances, in order to emphasize the importance of metals as essential nutrients for insect survival...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129280/daily-temperature-variation-and-extreme-high-temperatures-drive-performance-and-biotic-interactions-in-a-warming-world
#12
REVIEW
Robby Stoks, Julie Verheyen, Marie Van Dievel, Nedim Tüzün
We review the major patterns on the effects of daily temperature variation (DTV) and extreme high temperatures (EXT) on performance traits and the resulting outcome of biotic interactions in insects. EXT profoundly affects the outcome of all types of biotic interactions: competitive, predator-prey, herbivore-plant, host-pathogen/parasitoid and symbiotic interactions. Studies investigating effects of DTV on biotic interactions are few but also show strong effects on competitive and host-pathogen/parasitoid interactions...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129279/climate-change-effects-on-predator-prey-interactions
#13
REVIEW
Angela N Laws
Predator-prey interactions can be very important to community structure and function. A growing body of research demonstrates how climate change can modify these species interactions. Climate change can modify predator-prey interactions by affecting species characteristics, and by modifying consumptive and/or non-consumptive predator effects. Current work examines how climate change and predation risk can combine to influence herbivore stoichiometry and feeding ecology. Other recent advances show how climate change can affect chemical signaling of plants and insects, as well as how pollution and other components of the environmental context can modify predator-prey interactions...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129278/effects-of-global-change-on-insect-pollinators-multiple-drivers-lead-to-novel-communities
#14
REVIEW
Nicole E Rafferty
Global change drivers, in particular climate change, exotic species introduction, and habitat alteration, affect insect pollinators in numerous ways. In response, insect pollinators show shifts in range and phenology, interactions with plants and other taxa are altered, and in some cases pollination services have diminished. Recent studies show some pollinators are tracking climate change by moving latitudinally and elevationally, while others are not. Shifts in insect pollinator phenology generally keep pace with advances in flowering, although there are exceptions...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129277/implications-of-animal-water-balance-for-terrestrial-food-webs
#15
REVIEW
Kevin E McCluney
Recent research has documented shifts in per capita trophic interactions and food webs in response to changes in environmental moisture, from the top-down (consumers to plants), rather than solely bottom-up (plants to consumers). These responses may be predictable from effects of physiological, behavioral, and ecological traits on animal water balance, although predictions could be modified by energy or nutrient requirements, the risk of predation, population-level responses, and bottom-up effects. Relatively little work has explicitly explored food web effects of changes in animal water balance, despite the likelihood of widespread relevance, including during periodic droughts in mesic locations, where taxa may lack adaptations for water conservation...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129276/amino-acid-modulation-of-lifespan-and-reproduction-in-drosophila
#16
REVIEW
Katja M Hoedjes, Marisa A Rodrigues, Thomas Flatt
Manipulating amino acid (AA) intake in Drosophila can profoundly affect lifespan and reproduction. Remarkably, AA manipulation can uncouple the commonly observed trade-off between these traits. This finding seems to challenge the idea that this trade-off is due to competitive resource allocation, but here we argue that this view might be too simplistic. We also discuss the mechanisms of the AA response, mediated by the IIS/TOR and GCN2 pathways. Elucidating how these pathways respond to specific AA will likely yield important insights into how AA modulate the reproduction-lifespan relationship...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129275/how-micronutrients-influence-the-physiology-of-mosquitoes
#17
REVIEW
Crisalejandra Rivera-Pérez, Mark E Clifton, Fernando G Noriega
Micronutrients or non-energetic nutrients (NEN) are needed in reduced amounts, but are essential for many mosquito physiological processes that influence biological traits from vector competence to reproductive capacity. The NEN include amino acids (AA), vitamins, salts, metals and sterols. Free AA plays critical roles controlling most physiological processes, from digestion to reproduction. Particularly proline connects metabolic pathways in energy production, flight physiology and ammonia detoxification. Metal, in particular iron and calcium, salts, sterol and vitamin homeostasis are critical for cell signaling, respiration, metabolism and reproduction...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129274/using-artificial-diets-to-understand-the-nutritional-physiology-of-drosophila-melanogaster
#18
REVIEW
Matthew Dw Piper
Artificial diets have been in use for rearing insects for more than 100 years. Their composition ranges from completely chemically defined (holidic), to semi-defined (meridic) to non-defined (oligidic). Recently, meridic and holidic diets have been used to demonstrate previously unrecognised nutrient-sensitive behaviours and patterns of fitness trait expression in adult Drosophila melanogaster. This article presents a summary of the basic nutritional requirements of Drosophila followed by an account of some of these nutrient-modified phenotypes and what they can reveal about fundamental mechanisms...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29129273/contrasting-the-potential-effects-of-daytime-versus-nighttime-warming-on-insects
#19
REVIEW
Cori J Speights, Jason P Harmon, Brandon T Barton
Mean increases in temperatures associated with climate change are largely driven by increases in minimum (nighttime) temperatures; however, most climate change studies disproportionately increase maximum (daytime) temperatures. We review current literature to compare the potential effects of increasing daytime and nighttime temperatures on insects and their interactions within ecological communities. Although few studies have explicitly addressed the effects of nighttime warming, we draw from broader literature on how insects are affected by temperature to identify possible mechanisms that the timing (day or night) of warming may affect insects...
October 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28805647/editorial-overview-social-insects-integrative-approaches-to-understanding-insect-sociality-why-physiology-is-still-highly-relevant
#20
EDITORIAL
Amy L Toth, Adam G Dolezal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
journal
journal
49448
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"