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Movement Ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417004/the-effect-of-relatedness-and-pack-size-on-territory-overlap-in-african-wild-dogs
#1
Craig R Jackson, Rosemary J Groom, Neil R Jordan, J Weldon McNutt
BACKGROUND: Spacing patterns mediate competitive interactions between conspecifics, ultimately increasing fitness. The degree of territorial overlap between neighbouring African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) packs varies greatly, yet the role of factors potentially affecting the degree of overlap, such as relatedness and pack size, remain unclear. We used movement data from 21 wild dog packs to calculate the extent of territory overlap (20 dyads). RESULTS: On average, unrelated neighbouring packs had low levels of overlap restricted to the peripheral regions of their 95% utilisation kernels...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417003/migration-distance-as-a-selective-episode-for-wing-morphology-in-a-migratory-insect
#2
D T Tyler Flockhart, Blair Fitz-Gerald, Lincoln P Brower, Rachael Derbyshire, Sonia Altizer, Keith A Hobson, Leonard I Wassenaar, D Ryan Norris
BACKGROUND: Selective pressures that occur during long-distance migration can influence morphological traits across a range of taxa. In flying insects, selection should favour individuals that have wing morphologies that increase energy efficiency and survival. In monarch butterflies, differences in wing morphology between migratory and resident populations suggest that migratory populations have undergone selection for larger (as measured by length and area) and more elongated (as measured by roundness and aspect ratio) forewings...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28357113/identification-of-animal-movement-patterns-using-tri-axial-magnetometry
#3
Hannah J Williams, Mark D Holton, Emily L C Shepard, Nicola Largey, Brad Norman, Peter G Ryan, Olivier Duriez, Michael Scantlebury, Flavio Quintana, Elizabeth A Magowan, Nikki J Marks, Abdulaziz N Alagaili, Nigel C Bennett, Rory P Wilson
BACKGROUND: Accelerometers are powerful sensors in many bio-logging devices, and are increasingly allowing researchers to investigate the performance, behaviour, energy expenditure and even state, of free-living animals. Another sensor commonly used in animal-attached loggers is the magnetometer, which has been primarily used in dead-reckoning or inertial measurement tags, but little outside that. We examine the potential of magnetometers for helping elucidate the behaviour of animals in a manner analogous to, but very different from, accelerometers...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331618/movement-of-leopard-tortoises-in-response-to-environmental-and-climatic-variables-in-a-semi-arid-environment
#4
Martyn Drabik-Hamshare, Colleen T Downs
BACKGROUND: Tortoises (Testudinidae) occur in a wide range of environments, providing important ecosystem functions, such as seed dispersal and refuge in the form of burrows. Tortoise movement has previously been shown to be related to resource availability, reproductive status and local environmental conditions. However, understanding of the variables that drive their movement remains comparatively low. We investigated aspects of movement in leopard tortoises Stigmochelys pardalis-the largest and most abundant tortoise species in sub-Saharan Africa-in response to environmental, climatic and individual variables in the semi-arid Karoo, South Africa...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28270913/effects-of-environmental-features-and-sport-hunting-on-caribou-migration-in-northwestern-alaska
#5
Timothy J Fullman, Kyle Joly, Andrew Ackerman
BACKGROUND: Ungulate movements are influenced by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors, which may affect connectivity between key resource areas and seasonal ranges. In northwestern Alaska, one important question regarding human impacts on ungulate movement involves caribou (Rangifer tarandus) response to autumn hunting and related aircraft activity. While concerns have been voiced by local hunters about the influence of transporter aircraft and non-local sport hunters, there has been little quantitative analysis of the effects of hunter activity on caribou movement...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28239473/fine-scale-foraging-movements-by-fish-eating-killer-whales-orcinus-orca-relate-to-the-vertical-distributions-and-escape-responses-of-salmonid-prey-oncorhynchus-spp
#6
Brianna M Wright, John K B Ford, Graeme M Ellis, Volker B Deecke, Ari Daniel Shapiro, Brian C Battaile, Andrew W Trites
BACKGROUND: We sought to quantitatively describe the fine-scale foraging behavior of northern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca), a population of fish-eating killer whales that feeds almost exclusively on Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). To reconstruct the underwater movements of these specialist predators, we deployed 34 biologging Dtags on 32 individuals and collected high-resolution, three-dimensional accelerometry and acoustic data. We used the resulting dive paths to compare killer whale foraging behavior to the distributions of different salmonid prey species...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174661/movement-patterns-of-a-keystone-waterbird-species-are-highly-predictable-from-landscape-configuration
#7
Erik Kleyheeg, Jacintha G B van Dijk, Despina Tsopoglou-Gkina, Tara Y Woud, Dieuwertje K Boonstra, Bart A Nolet, Merel B Soons
BACKGROUND: Movement behaviour is fundamental to the ecology of animals and their interactions with other organisms, and as such contributes to ecosystem dynamics. Waterfowl are key players in ecological processes in wetlands and surrounding habitats through predator-prey interactions and their transportation of nutrients and other organisms. Understanding the drivers of their movement behaviour is crucial to predict how environmental changes affect their role in ecosystem functioning...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149522/incorporating-periodic-variability-in-hidden-markov-models-for-animal-movement
#8
Michael Li, Benjamin M Bolker
BACKGROUND: Clustering time-series data into discrete groups can improve prediction and provide insight into the nature of underlying, unobservable states of the system. However, temporal variation in probabilities of group occupancy, or the rates at which individuals move between groups, can obscure such signals. We use finite mixture and hidden Markov models (HMMs), two standard clustering techniques, to model long-term hourly movement data from Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi)...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891228/a-probabilistic-algorithm-to-process-geolocation-data
#9
Benjamin Merkel, Richard A Phillips, Sébastien Descamps, Nigel G Yoccoz, Børge Moe, Hallvard Strøm
BACKGROUND: The use of light level loggers (geolocators) to understand movements and distributions in terrestrial and marine vertebrates, particularly during the non-breeding period, has increased dramatically in recent years. However, inferring positions from light data is not straightforward, often relies on assumptions that are difficult to test, or includes an element of subjectivity. RESULTS: We present an intuitive framework to compute locations from twilight events collected by geolocators from different manufacturers...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27833750/towards-a-conceptual-framework-for-explaining-variation-in-nocturnal-departure-time-of-songbird-migrants
#10
REVIEW
Florian Müller, Philip D Taylor, Sissel Sjöberg, Rachel Muheim, Arseny Tsvey, Stuart A Mackenzie, Heiko Schmaljohann
Most songbird migrants travel between their breeding areas and wintering grounds by a series of nocturnal flights. The exact nocturnal departure time for these flights varies considerably between individuals even of the same species. Although the basic circannual and circadian rhythms of songbirds, their adaptation to migration, and the factors influencing the birds' day-to-day departure decision are reasonably well studied, we do not understand how birds time their departures within the night. These decisions are crucial, because the nocturnal departure time defines the potential flight duration of the migratory night...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27800161/navigating-uncertain-waters-a-critical-review-of-inferring-foraging-behaviour-from-location-and-dive-data-in-pinnipeds
#11
REVIEW
Matt Ian Daniel Carter, Kimberley A Bennett, Clare B Embling, Philip J Hosegood, Debbie J F Russell
In the last thirty years, the emergence and progression of biologging technology has led to great advances in marine predator ecology. Large databases of location and dive observations from biologging devices have been compiled for an increasing number of diving predator species (such as pinnipeds, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans), enabling complex questions about animal activity budgets and habitat use to be addressed. Central to answering these questions is our ability to correctly identify and quantify the frequency of essential behaviours, such as foraging...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27729983/multi-year-tracking-reveals-extensive-pelagic-phase-of-juvenile-loggerhead-sea-turtles-in-the-north-pacific
#12
D K Briscoe, D M Parker, S Bograd, E Hazen, K Scales, G H Balazs, M Kurita, T Saito, H Okamoto, M Rice, J J Polovina, L B Crowder
BACKGROUND: The juvenile stage of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) can last for decades. In the North Pacific Ocean, much is known about their seasonal movements in relation to pelagic habitat, yet understanding their multi-year, basin-scale movements has proven more difficult. Here, we categorize the large-scale movements of 231 turtles satellite tracked from 1997 to 2013 and explore the influence of biological and environmental drivers on basin-scale movement. RESULTS: Results show high residency of juvenile loggerheads within the Central North Pacific and a moderate influence of the Earth's magnetic field, but no real-time environmental driver to explain migratory behavior...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27688882/a-spherical-plot-solution-to-linking-acceleration-metrics-with-animal-performance-state-behaviour-and-lifestyle
#13
Rory P Wilson, Mark D Holton, James S Walker, Emily L C Shepard, D Mike Scantlebury, Vianney L Wilson, Gwendoline I Wilson, Brenda Tysse, Mike Gravenor, Javier Ciancio, Melitta A McNarry, Kelly A Mackintosh, Lama Qasem, Frank Rosell, Patricia M Graf, Flavio Quintana, Agustina Gomez-Laich, Juan-Emilio Sala, Christina C Mulvenna, Nicola J Marks, Mark W Jones
BACKGROUND: We are increasingly using recording devices with multiple sensors operating at high frequencies to produce large volumes of data which are problematic to interpret. A particularly challenging example comes from studies on animals and humans where researchers use animal-attached accelerometers on moving subjects to attempt to quantify behaviour, energy expenditure and condition. RESULTS: The approach taken effectively concatinated three complex lines of acceleration into one visualization that highlighted patterns that were otherwise not obvious...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27595001/path-segmentation-for-beginners-an-overview-of-current-methods-for-detecting-changes-in-animal-movement-patterns
#14
REVIEW
Hendrik Edelhoff, Johannes Signer, Niko Balkenhol
Increased availability of high-resolution movement data has led to the development of numerous methods for studying changes in animal movement behavior. Path segmentation methods provide basics for detecting movement changes and the behavioral mechanisms driving them. However, available path segmentation methods differ vastly with respect to underlying statistical assumptions and output produced. Consequently, it is currently difficult for researchers new to path segmentation to gain an overview of the different methods, and choose one that is appropriate for their data and research questions...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27486515/morphometrics-and-stable-isotopes-differentiate-wintering-populations-of-a-migratory-bird
#15
Ivan Maggini, Benjamin Metzger, Maren Voss, Christian C Voigt, Franz Bairlein
BACKGROUND: Describing migratory connectivity in mobile animals is crucial for understanding the selective pressures acting on different populations throughout their life cycle. Tracking single individuals has provided valuable data, but for most species the data available are still spurious and usually limited to a few individuals. Since different populations of migratory birds can be distinguished by a combination of morphometric measurements and the isotopic composition of their feathers, it is possible to measure these parameters on a large sample to differentiate populations...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27482382/uncovering-periodic-patterns-of-space-use-in-animal-tracking-data-with-periodograms-including-a-new-algorithm-for-the-lomb-scargle-periodogram-and-improved-randomization-tests
#16
Guillaume Péron, Chris H Fleming, Rogerio C de Paula, Justin M Calabrese
BACKGROUND: Periodicity in activity level (rest/activity cycles) is ubiquitous in nature, but whether and how these periodicities translate into periodic patterns of space use by animals is much less documented. Here we introduce an analytical protocol based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram (LSP) to facilitate exploration of animal tracking datasets for periodic patterns. The LSP accommodates missing observations and variation in the sampling intervals of the location time series. RESULTS: We describe a new, fast algorithm to compute the LSP...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27429757/collective-behavior-as-a-driver-of-critical-transitions-in-migratory-populations
#17
Andrew Berdahl, Anieke van Leeuwen, Simon A Levin, Colin J Torney
BACKGROUND: Mass migrations are among the most striking examples of animal movement in the natural world. Such migrations are major drivers of ecosystem processes and strongly influence the survival and fecundity of individuals. For migratory animals, a formidable challenge is to find their way over long distances and through complex, dynamic environments. However, recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that by traveling in groups, individuals are able to overcome these challenges and increase their ability to navigate...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27375849/landscape-level-movement-patterns-by-lions-in-western-serengeti-comparing-the-influence-of-inter-specific-competitors-habitat-attributes-and-prey-availability
#18
Andrew M Kittle, John K Bukombe, Anthony R E Sinclair, Simon A R Mduma, John M Fryxell
BACKGROUND: Where apex predators move on the landscape influences ecosystem structure and function and is therefore key to effective landscape-level management and species-specific conservation. However the factors underlying predator distribution patterns within functional ecosystems are poorly understood. Predator movement should be sensitive to the spatial patterns of inter-specific competitors, spatial variation in prey density, and landscape attributes that increase individual prey vulnerability...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27307991/using-stable-hydrogen-isotopes-to-reveal-immigration-in-an-arctic-breeding-songbird-population
#19
Franz Bairlein, D Ryan Norris, Christian C Voigt, Erica H Dunn, David J T Hussell
BACKGROUND: Knowledge of immigration and emigration rates is crucial for understanding of population dynamics, yet little is known about these vital rates, especially for arctic songbirds. We estimated immigration in an Arctic population of northern wheatears on Baffin Island, Canada, by the use of stable hydrogen isotopes in tail feathers (δ(2)HK). We assumed that δ(2)HK values of juvenile (hatch-year) feathers grown at the breeding grounds were representative of the local population, while those of breeding adults were indicative of where they grew their feathers during their post-breeding molt the previous year...
2016: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27252856/flexible-characterization-of-animal-movement-pattern-using-net-squared-displacement-and-a-latent-state-model
#20
Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau, Jonathan R Potts, Charles B Yackulic, Jacqueline L Frair, E Hance Ellington, Stephen Blake
BACKGROUND: Characterizing the movement patterns of animals is an important step in understanding their ecology. Various methods have been developed for classifying animal movement at both coarse (e.g., migratory vs. sedentary behavior) and fine (e.g., resting vs. foraging) scales. A popular approach for classifying movements at coarse resolutions involves fitting time series of net-squared displacement (NSD) to models representing different conceptualizations of coarse movement strategies (i...
2016: Movement Ecology
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