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Annual Review of Virology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645240/engineered-expression-of-broadly-neutralizing-antibodies-against-human-immunodeficiency-virus
#1
Maham Ahmad, Osama M Ahmed, Bruce Schnepp, Philip R Johnson
This review discusses recent progress made in developing a vaccine and novel treatments for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It highlights the shortcomings of the RV144 vaccination trial [ALVAC-HIV (vCP1521) and AIDSVAX B/E] and the current standard of care and proposes that engineered expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 could overcome these shortcomings. Current developments in three major lines of research on HIV prevention and treatment using bNAbs are reviewed: firstly, the use of sequential immunogens to activate B cells to express bNAbs; secondly, the delivery of novel and extremely potent bNAbs through passive administration; and finally, the use of gene transfer using adeno-associated viral vectors to deliver bNAbs...
June 23, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645239/cassava-mosaic-and-brown-streak-diseases-current-perspectives-and-beyond
#2
Chrissie Rey, Hervé Vanderschuren Vanderschuren
Cassava is the fourth largest source of calories in the world but is subject to economically important yield losses due to viral diseases, including cassava brown streak disease and cassava mosaic disease. Cassava mosaic disease occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and the Asian subcontinent and is associated with nine begomovirus species, whereas cassava brown streak disease has to date been reported only in sub-Saharan Africa and is caused by two distinct ipomovirus species. We present an overview of key milestones and their significance in the understanding and characterization of these two major diseases as well as their associated viruses and whitefly vector...
June 23, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645238/new-world-arenavirus-biology
#3
Nicolás Sarute, Susan R Ross
Hemorrhagic fevers caused by viruses were identified in the late 1950s in South America. These viruses have existed in their hosts, the New World rodents, for millions of years. Their emergence as infectious agents in humans coincided with changes in the environment and farming practices that caused explosions in their host rodent populations. Zoonosis into humans likely occurs because the pathogenic New World arenaviruses use human transferrin receptor 1 to enter cells. The mortality rate after infection with these viruses is high, but the mechanism by which disease is induced is still not clear...
June 23, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637388/progressive-multifocal-leukoencephalopathy-endemic-viruses-and-lethal-brain-disease
#4
Sheila A Haley, Walter J Atwood
In 1971, the first human polyomavirus was isolated from the brain of a patient who died from a rapidly progressing demyelinating disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The virus was named JC virus after the initials of the patient. In that same year a second human polyomavirus was discovered in the urine of a kidney transplant patient and named BK virus. In the intervening years it became clear that both viruses were widespread in the human population but only rarely caused disease. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of eleven new human polyomaviruses, two of which cause unusual and rare cancers...
June 21, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637387/immunopathology-of-chikungunya-virus-infection-lessons-learned-from-patients-and-animal-models
#5
Lisa F P Ng
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus that causes acute and chronic arthritis. The virus reemerged in the Indian Ocean islands in 2005-2006 and is responsible for outbreaks in the Caribbean islands and the Americas since late 2013. Despite the wealth of research over the past 10 years, there are no commercially available antiviral drugs or vaccines. Treatment usually involves analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and supportive care. Most studies have been focused on understanding the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection through clinical observation and with animal models...
June 21, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637386/enzymes-and-enzyme-activity-encoded-by-nonenveloped-viruses
#6
Kimi Azad, Manidipa Banerjee, John E Johnson
Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses...
June 21, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548882/finding-conducting-and-nurturing-science-a-virologist-s-memoir
#7
Anna Marie Ann Skalka Skalka
My laboratory investigations have been driven by an abiding interest in understanding the consequences of genetic rearrangement in evolution and disease, and in using viruses to elucidate fundamental mechanisms in biology. Starting with bacteriophages and moving to the retroviruses, my use of the tools of genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, and biophysics has spanned more than half a century-from the time when DNA structure was just discovered to the present day of big data and epigenetics. Both riding and contributing to the successive waves of technology, my laboratory has elucidated fundamental mechanisms in DNA replication, repair, and recombination...
May 26, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548881/constraints-drivers-and-implications-of-influenza-a-virus-reassortment
#8
Anice C Lowen
Influenza A viruses are constantly changing. This change accounts for seasonal epidemics, infrequent pandemics, and zoonotic outbreaks. A major mechanism underlying the genetic diversification of influenza A virus is reassortment of intact gene segments between coinfecting viruses. This exchange is possible because of the segmented nature of the viral genome. Here, I first consider the constraints and drivers acting on influenza A virus reassortment, including the likelihood of coinfection at the host and cellular levels, mixing and assembly of heterologous gene segments within coinfected cells, and the fitness associated with reassortant genotypes...
May 26, 2017: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741409/viruses-as-winners-in-the-game-of-life
#9
Ana Georgina Cobián Güemes, Merry Youle, Vito Adrian Cantú, Ben Felts, James Nulton, Forest Rohwer
Viruses are the most abundant and the most diverse life form. In this meta-analysis we estimate that there are 4.80×10(31) phages on Earth. Further, 97% of viruses are in soil and sediment-two underinvestigated biomes that combined account for only ∼2.5% of publicly available viral metagenomes. The majority of the most abundant viral sequences from all biomes are novel. Our analysis drawing on all publicly available viral metagenomes observed a mere 257,698 viral genotypes on Earth-an unrealistically low number-which attests to the current paucity of viral metagenomic data...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741408/the-strange-expanding-world-of-animal-hepaciviruses
#10
Alex S Hartlage, John M Cullen, Amit Kapoor
Hepaciviruses and pegiviruses constitute two closely related sister genera of the family Flaviviridae. In the past five years, the known phylogenetic diversity of the hepacivirus genera has absolutely exploded. What was once an isolated infection in humans (and possibly other primates) has now expanded to include horses, rodents, bats, colobus monkeys, cows, and, most recently, catsharks, shedding new light on the genetic diversity and host range of hepaciviruses. Interestingly, despite the identification of these many animal and primate hepaciviruses, the equine hepaciviruses remain the closest genetic relatives of the human hepaciviruses, providing an intriguing clue to the zoonotic source of hepatitis C virus...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741407/moving-on-out-transport-and-packaging-of-influenza-viral-rna-into-virions
#11
Seema S Lakdawala, Ervin Fodor, Kanta Subbarao
Influenza A viruses bear an eight-segmented single-stranded negative-sense RNA genome that is replicated in the nucleus. Newly synthesized viral RNA (vRNA) segments are exported from the nucleus and transported to the plasma membrane for packaging into progeny virions. Influenza viruses exploit many host proteins during these events, and this is the portion of the viral life cycle when genetic reassortment among influenza viruses occurs. Reassortment among influenza A viruses allows viruses to expand their host range, virulence, and pandemic potential...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741406/bugs-are-not-to-be-silenced-small-rna-pathways-and-antiviral-responses-in-insects
#12
Vanesa Mongelli, Maria-Carla Saleh
Like every other organism on Earth, insects are infected with viruses, and they rely on RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms to circumvent viral infections. A remarkable characteristic of RNAi is that it is both broadly acting, because it is triggered by double-stranded RNA molecules derived from virtually any virus, and extremely specific, because it targets only the particular viral sequence that initiated the process. Reviews covering the different facets of the RNAi antiviral immune response in insects have been published elsewhere...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741405/transgenic-mouse-models-of-tumor-virus-action
#13
Paul F Lambert
Genetically engineered mice (GEMs) have provided valuable insights into the carcinogenic properties of various human tumor viruses, which, in aggregate, are etiologically associated with over 15% of all human cancers. This review provides an overview of seminal discoveries made through the use of GEM models for human DNA tumor viruses. Emphasis is placed on the discoveries made in the study of human papillomaviruses, Merkel cell carcinoma-associated polyomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, because GEMs have contributed extensively to our understanding of how these DNA tumor viruses directly contribute to human cancers...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741404/the-language-of-life
#14
Ann C Palmenberg
Science is our best current approximation of the way things work. You cannot do science unless you believe there is a discernable truth inherent to the arrangement of our tangible world. The problem is, we in our given time never know where exactly the asymptote lies or how far we are from it. My curiosity about the natural world is innate, but fate has variously gifted me with outstanding personal opportunities to indulge that curiosity through the study of viruses. To a woman of the boomer generation, professional paths were not always open-door, and to a certain extent they still aren't...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618637/modeling-viral-spread
#15
Frederik Graw, Alan S Perelson
The way in which a viral infection spreads within a host is a complex process that is not well understood. Different viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus, have evolved different strategies, including direct cell-to-cell transmission and cell-free transmission, to spread within a host. To what extent these two modes of transmission are exploited in vivo is still unknown. Mathematical modeling has been an essential tool to get a better systematic and quantitative understanding of viral processes that are difficult to discern through strictly experimental approaches...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27578441/tombusvirus-host-interactions-co-opted-evolutionarily-conserved-host-factors-take-center-court
#16
Peter D Nagy
Plant positive-strand (+)RNA viruses are intracellular infectious agents that reorganize subcellular membranes and rewire the cellular metabolism of host cells to achieve viral replication in elaborate replication compartments. This review describes the viral replication process based on tombusviruses, highlighting common strategies with other plant and animal viruses. Overall, the works on Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) have revealed intriguing and complex functions of co-opted cellular translation factors, heat shock proteins, DEAD-box helicases, lipid transfer proteins, and membrane-deforming proteins in virus replication...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27578440/epstein-barr-virus-the-path-from-latent-to-productive-infection
#17
Ya-Fang Chiu, Bill Sugden
The intrinsic properties of different viruses have driven their study. For example, the capacity for efficient productive infection of cultured cells by herpes simplex virus 1 has made it a paradigm for this mode of infection for herpesviruses in general. Epstein-Barr virus, another herpesvirus, has two properties that have driven its study: It causes human cancers, and it exhibits a tractable transition from its latent to its productive cycle in cell culture. Here, we review our understanding of the path Epstein-Barr virus follows to move from a latent infection to and through its productive cycle...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27578439/epidemiology-and-management-of-the-2013-16-west-african-ebola-outbreak
#18
M L Boisen, J N Hartnett, A Goba, M A Vandi, D S Grant, J S Schieffelin, R F Garry, L M Branco
The 2013-16 West African Ebola outbreak is the largest, most geographically dispersed, and deadliest on record, with 28,616 suspected cases and 11,310 deaths recorded to date in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. We provide a review of the epidemiology and management of the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa aimed at stimulating reflection on lessons learned that may improve the response to the next international health crisis caused by a pathogen that emerges in a region of the world with a severely limited health care infrastructure...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27578438/unraveling-the-mysterious-interactions-between-hepatitis-c-virus-rna-and-liver-specific-microrna-122
#19
Peter Sarnow, Selena M Sagan
Many viruses encode or subvert cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) to aid in their gene expression, amplification strategies, or pathogenic signatures. miRNAs typically downregulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region of their mRNA targets. As a result, target mRNAs are translationally repressed and subsequently deadenylated and degraded. Curiously, hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, recruits two molecules of liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) to the 5' end of its genome...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27578437/bats-as-viral-reservoirs
#20
David T S Hayman
Bats are hosts of a range of viruses, including ebolaviruses, and many important human viral infections, such as measles and mumps, may have their ancestry traced back to bats. Here, I review viruses of all viral families detected in global bat populations. The viral diversity in bats is substantial, and viruses with all known types of genomic structures and replication strategies have been discovered in bats. However, the discovery of viruses is not geographically even, with some apparently undersampled regions, such as South America...
September 29, 2016: Annual Review of Virology
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