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Trends in Hearing

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29320944/effects-of-varying-reverberation-on-music-perception-for-young-normal-hearing-and-old-hearing-impaired-listeners
#1
Paul N Reinhart, Pamela E Souza
Reverberation enhances music perception and is one of the most important acoustic factors in auditorium design. However, previous research on reverberant music perception has focused on young normal-hearing (YNH) listeners. Old hearing-impaired (OHI) listeners have degraded spatial auditory processing; therefore, they may perceive reverberant music differently. Two experiments were conducted examining the effects of varying reverberation on music perception for YNH and OHI listeners. Experiment 1 examined whether YNH listeners and OHI listeners prefer different amounts of reverberation for classical music listening...
January 2018: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298599/the-effectiveness-of-a-vocational-enablement-protocol-for-employees-with-hearing-difficulties-results-of-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#2
Arjenne H M Gussenhoven, Johannes R Anema, Birgit I Witte, S Theo Goverts, Sophia E Kramer
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a vocational enablement protocol (VEP) on need for recovery (NFR) after work as compared with usual care for employees with hearing difficulties. In a randomized controlled trial design, 136 employees with hearing impairment were randomly assigned to either the VEP or the control group. VEP is a multidisciplinary program integrating audiological and occupational care for individuals experiencing difficulties in the workplace due to hearing loss. The primary outcome measure was NFR...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237334/the-association-between-cognitive-performance-and-speech-in-noise-perception-for-adult-listeners-a-systematic-literature-review-and-meta-analysis
#3
Adam Dryden, Harriet A Allen, Helen Henshaw, Antje Heinrich
Published studies assessing the association between cognitive performance and speech-in-noise (SiN) perception examine different aspects of each, test different listeners, and often report quite variable associations. By examining the published evidence base using a systematic approach, we aim to identify robust patterns across studies and highlight any remaining gaps in knowledge. We limit our assessment to adult unaided listeners with audiometric profiles ranging from normal hearing to moderate hearing loss...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237333/predictors-of-entering-a-hearing-aid-evaluation-period-a-prospective-study-in-older-hearing-help-seekers
#4
Marieke Pronk, Dorly J H Deeg, Niek J Versfeld, Martijn W Heymans, Graham Naylor, Sophia E Kramer
This study aimed to determine the predictors of entering a hearing aid evaluation period (HAEP) using a prospective design drawing on the health belief model and the transtheoretical model. In total, 377 older persons who presented with hearing problems to an Ear, Nose, and Throat specialist ( n = 110) or a hearing aid dispenser ( n = 267) filled in a baseline questionnaire. After 4 months, it was determined via a telephone interview whether or not participants had decided to enter a HAEP. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to determine which baseline variables predicted HAEP status...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29212433/age-dependence-of-thresholds-for-speech-in-noise-in-normal-hearing-adolescents
#5
Irene Jacobi, Marya Sheikh Rashid, Jan A P M de Laat, Wouter A Dreschler
Previously found effects of age on thresholds for speech reception thresholds in noise in adolescents as measured by an online screening survey require further study in a well-controlled teenage sample. Speech reception thresholds (SRT) of 72 normal-hearing adolescent students were analyzed by means of the online speech-in-noise screening tool Earcheck (In Dutch: Oorcheck). Screening was performed at school and included pure-tone audiometry to ensure normal-hearing thresholds. The students' ages ranged from 12 to 17 years...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29205100/role-of-cortical-auditory-evoked-potentials-in-reducing-the-age-at-hearing-aid-fitting-in-children-with-hearing-loss-identified-by-newborn-hearing-screening
#6
Kinjal Mehta, Peter Watkin, Margaret Baldwin, Josephine Marriage, Merle Mahon, Deborah Vickers
Recording of free-field cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) responses to speech tokens was introduced into the audiology management for infants with a permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) during 2011-2015 at a U.K. service. Children with bilateral PCHI were studied from two sequential cohorts. Thirty-four children had followed an audiology pathway prior to CAEP introduction, and 44 children followed a pathway after the introduction of CAEP and were tested with unaided and aided CAEP responses...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29205095/lexical-access-ability-and-cognitive-predictors-of-speech-recognition-in-noise-in-adult-cochlear-implant-users
#7
Marre W Kaandorp, Cas Smits, Paul Merkus, Joost M Festen, S Theo Goverts
Not all of the variance in speech-recognition performance of cochlear implant (CI) users can be explained by biographic and auditory factors. In normal-hearing listeners, linguistic and cognitive factors determine most of speech-in-noise performance. The current study explored specifically the influence of visually measured lexical-access ability compared with other cognitive factors on speech recognition of 24 postlingually deafened CI users. Speech-recognition performance was measured with monosyllables in quiet (consonant-vowel-consonant [CVC]), sentences-in-noise (SIN), and digit-triplets in noise (DIN)...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29169315/effectiveness-of-two-talker-maskers-that-differ-in-talker-congruity-and-perceptual-similarity-to-the-target-speech
#8
Lauren Calandruccio, Emily Buss, Kristina Bowdrie
Previous work has shown that masked-sentence recognition is particularly poor when the masker is composed of two competing talkers, a finding that is attributed to informational masking. Informational masking tends to be largest when the target and masker talkers are perceptually similar. Reductions in masking have been observed for a wide range of target and masker differences, including language: Performance is better when the target and masker talkers speak in different languages, compared with the same language...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29169314/word-recognition-and-learning-effects-of-hearing-loss-and-amplification-feature
#9
Andrea L Pittman, Elizabeth C Stewart, Amanda P Willman, Ian S Odgear
Two amplification features were examined using auditory tasks that varied in stimulus familiarity. It was expected that the benefits of certain amplification features would increase as the familiarity with the stimuli decreased. A total of 20 children and 15 adults with normal hearing as well as 21 children and 17 adults with mild to severe hearing loss participated. Three models of ear-level devices were selected based on the quality of the high-frequency amplification or the digital noise reduction (DNR) they provided...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161987/encoding-a-melody-using-only-temporal-information-for-cochlear-implant-and-normal-hearing-listeners
#10
Ann E Todd, Griet Mertens, Paul Van de Heyning, David M Landsberger
One way to provide pitch information to cochlear implant users is through amplitude-modulation rate. It is currently unknown whether amplitude-modulation rate can provide cochlear implant users with pitch information adequate for perceiving melodic information. In the present study, the notes of a song were encoded via amplitude-modulation rate of pulse trains on single electrodes at the apex or middle of long electrode arrays. The melody of the song was either physically correct or modified by compression or expansion...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161982/the-effects-of-musical-training-on-speech-detection-in-the-presence-of-informational-and-energetic-masking
#11
Charlotte Morse-Fortier, Mary M Parrish, Jane A Baran, Richard L Freyman
Recent research has suggested that musicians have an advantage in some speech-in-noise paradigms, but not all. Whether musicians outperform nonmusicians on a given speech-in-noise task may well depend on the type of noise involved. To date, few groups have specifically studied the role that informational masking plays in the observation of a musician advantage. The current study investigated the effect of musicianship on listeners' ability to overcome informational versus energetic masking of speech. Monosyllabic words were presented in four conditions that created similar energetic masking but either high or low informational masking...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29113579/use-of-research-interfaces-for-psychophysical-studies-with-cochlear-implant-users
#12
Ruth Y Litovsky, Matthew J Goupell, Alan Kan, David M Landsberger
A growing number of laboratories are using research interfaces to conduct experiments with cochlear-implant (CI) users. Because these interfaces bypass a subject's clinical sound processor, several concerns exist regarding safety and stimulation levels. Here we suggest best-practice approaches for how to safely and ethically perform this type of research and highlight areas of limited knowledge where further research is needed to help clarify safety limits. The article is designed to provide an introductory level of technical detail about the devices and the effects of electrical stimulation on perception and neurophysiology...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29105620/loud-music-exposure-and-cochlear-synaptopathy-in-young-adults-isolated-auditory-brainstem-response-effects-but-no-perceptual-consequences
#13
John H Grose, Emily Buss, Joseph W Hall
The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that listeners with frequent exposure to loud music exhibit deficits in suprathreshold auditory performance consistent with cochlear synaptopathy. Young adults with normal audiograms were recruited who either did ( n = 31) or did not ( n = 30) have a history of frequent attendance at loud music venues where the typical sound levels could be expected to result in temporary threshold shifts. A test battery was administered that comprised three sets of procedures: (a) electrophysiological tests including distortion product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem responses, envelope following responses, and the acoustic change complex evoked by an interaural phase inversion; (b) psychoacoustic tests including temporal modulation detection, spectral modulation detection, and sensitivity to interaural phase; and (c) speech tests including filtered phoneme recognition and speech-in-noise recognition...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29090641/evaluation-of-a-method-for-determining-binaural-sensitivity-to-temporal-fine-structure-tfs-af-test-for-older-listeners-with-normal-and-impaired-low-frequency-hearing
#14
Christian Füllgrabe, Brian C J Moore
The ability to process binaural temporal fine structure (TFS) information was assessed using the TFS-AF test (where AF stands for adaptive frequency) for 26 listeners aged 60 years or more with normal or elevated low-frequency audiometric thresholds. The test estimates the highest frequency at which a fixed interaural phase difference (IPD) of ϕ (varied here between 30° and 180°) can be discriminated from an IPD of 0°, with higher thresholds indicating better performance. A sensation level of 30 dB was used...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29090640/listening-into-2030-workshop-an-experiment-in-envisioning-the-future-of-hearing-and-communication-science
#15
Simon Carlile, Gregory Ciccarelli, Jane Cockburn, Anna C Diedesch, Megan K Finnegan, Ervin Hafter, Simon Henin, Sridhar Kalluri, Alexander J E Kell, Erol J Ozmeral, Casey L Roark, Jessica E Sagers
Here we report the methods and output of a workshop examining possible futures of speech and hearing science out to 2030. Using a design thinking approach, a range of human-centered problems in communication were identified that could provide the motivation for a wide range of research. Nine main research programs were distilled and are summarized: (a) measuring brain and other physiological parameters, (b) auditory and multimodal displays of information, (c) auditory scene analysis, (d) enabling and understanding shared auditory virtual spaces, (e) holistic approaches to health management and hearing impairment, (f) universal access to evolving and individualized technologies, (g) biological intervention for hearing dysfunction, (h) understanding the psychosocial interactions with technology and other humans as mediated by technology, and (i) the impact of changing models of security and privacy...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29076393/designing-clinical-trials-for-assessing-the-effectiveness-of-interventions-for-tinnitus
#16
Deborah A Hall
In the face of finite resources, allocations of research and health-care funding are dependent upon high-quality evidence. Historically, tinnitus has been the poor cousin of hearing science, with low-quality clinical research providing unreliable estimates of effect and with devices marketed for tinnitus without strong evidence for those product claims. However, the tinnitus field is changing. Key opinion leaders have recently made calls to the field to improve the design, implementation, and reporting of clinical trials, and there is growing intersectoral collaboration...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027511/evaluation-of-a-frequency-lowering-algorithm-for-adults-with-high-frequency-hearing-loss
#17
Marina Salorio-Corbetto, Thomas Baer, Brian C J Moore
The objective was to determine the effects of a frequency-lowering algorithm (frequency composition, Fcomp) on consonant identification, word-final /s, z/ detection, the intelligibility of sentences in noise, and subjective benefit, for people with high-frequency hearing loss, including people with dead regions (DRs) in the cochlea. A single-blind randomized crossover design was used. Performance with Bernafon Acriva 9 hearing aids was compared with Fcomp off and Fcomp on. Participants wore the hearing aids in each condition in a counterbalanced order...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28982021/a-data-driven-synthesis-of-research-evidence-for-domains-of-hearing-loss-as-reported-by-adults-with-hearing-loss-and-their-communication-partners
#18
Venessa Vas, Michael A Akeroyd, Deborah A Hall
A number of assessment tools exist to evaluate the impact of hearing loss, with little consensus among researchers as to either preference or psychometric adequacy. The item content of hearing loss assessment tools should seek to capture the impact of hearing loss on everyday life, but to date no one has synthesized the range of hearing loss complaints from the perspectives of the person with hearing loss and their communication partner. The current review aims to synthesize the evidence on person with hearing loss- and communication partner-reported complaints of hearing loss...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28969522/soft-tissue-conduction-review-mechanisms-and-implications
#19
Haim Sohmer
Soft tissue conduction (STC) is a recently explored mode of auditory stimulation, complementing air (AC) and bone (BC) conduction stimulation. STC can be defined as the hearing induced when vibratory stimuli reach skin and soft tissue sites not directly overlying skull bone such as the head, neck, thorax, and body. Examples of STC include the delivery of vibrations to the skin of parts of the body by a clinical bone vibrator, hearing underwater sounds and free field air sounds, while AC hearing is attenuated by earplugs...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28929903/predictors-of-hearing-aid-outcomes
#20
Enrique A Lopez-Poveda, Peter T Johannesen, Patricia Pérez-González, José L Blanco, Sridhar Kalluri, Brent Edwards
Over 360 million people worldwide suffer from disabling hearing loss. Most of them can be treated with hearing aids. Unfortunately, performance with hearing aids and the benefit obtained from using them vary widely across users. Here, we investigate the reasons for such variability. Sixty-eight hearing-aid users or candidates were fitted bilaterally with nonlinear hearing aids using standard procedures. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring aided speech intelligibility in a time-reversed two-talker background and self-reported improvement in hearing ability...
January 2017: Trends in Hearing
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