journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Cells

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800101/induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-neuronal-models-for-the-study-of-autophagy-pathways-in-human-neurodegenerative-disease
#1
REVIEW
Natalia Jiménez-Moreno, Petros Stathakos, Maeve A Caldwell, Jon D Lane
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are invaluable tools for research into the causes of diverse human diseases, and have enormous potential in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. Our ability to reprogramme patient cells to become hiPSCs, and to subsequently direct their differentiation towards those classes of neurons that are vulnerable to stress, is revealing how genetic mutations cause changes at the molecular level that drive the complex pathogeneses of human neurodegenerative diseases...
August 11, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28704946/exploring-autophagy-in-drosophila
#2
REVIEW
Péter Lőrincz, Caroline Mauvezin, Gábor Juhász
Autophagy is a catabolic process in eukaryotic cells promoting bulk or selective degradation of cellular components within lysosomes. In recent decades, several model systems were utilized to dissect the molecular machinery of autophagy and to identify the impact of this cellular "self-eating" process on various physiological and pathological processes. Here we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a popular model in cell and developmental biology, to apprehend the main pathway of autophagy in a complete animal...
July 12, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28698482/studying-autophagy-in-zebrafish
#3
REVIEW
Benan John Mathai, Annemarie H Meijer, Anne Simonsen
Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process which allows lysosomal degradation of complex cytoplasmic components into basic biomolecules that are recycled for further cellular use. Autophagy is critical for cellular homeostasis and for degradation of misfolded proteins and damaged organelles as well as intracellular pathogens. The role of autophagy in protection against age-related diseases and a plethora of other diseases is now coming to light; assisted by several divergent eukaryotic model systems ranging from yeast to mice...
July 9, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28686195/assays-to-monitor-autophagy-progression-in-cell-cultures
#4
REVIEW
Idil Orhon, Fulvio Reggiori
The vast number of implications of autophagy in multiple areas of life sciences and medicine has attracted the interest of numerous scientists that aim to unveil the role of this process in specific physiological and pathological contexts. Cell cultures are one of the most frequently used experimental setup for the investigation of autophagy. As a result, it is essential to assess this highly regulated molecular pathway with efficient and reliable methods. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages...
July 7, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671618/vascular-mechanobiology-towards-control-of-in-situ-regeneration
#5
REVIEW
Eline E van Haaften, Carlijn V C Bouten, Nicholas A Kurniawan
The paradigm of regenerative medicine has recently shifted from in vitro to in situ tissue engineering: implanting a cell-free, biodegradable, off-the-shelf available scaffold and inducing the development of functional tissue by utilizing the regenerative potential of the body itself. This approach offers a prospect of not only alleviating the clinical demand for autologous vessels but also circumventing the current challenges with synthetic grafts. In order to move towards a hypothesis-driven engineering approach, we review three crucial aspects that need to be taken into account when regenerating vessels: (1) the structure-function relation for attaining mechanical homeostasis of vascular tissues, (2) the environmental cues governing cell function, and (3) the available experimental platforms to test instructive scaffolds for in situ tissue engineering...
July 3, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671610/methods-to-monitor-and-quantify-autophagy-in-the-social-amoeba-dictyostelium-discoideum
#6
REVIEW
Eunice Domínguez-Martín, Elena Cardenal-Muñoz, Jason S King, Thierry Soldati, Roberto Coria, Ricardo Escalante
Autophagy is a eukaryotic catabolic pathway that degrades and recycles cellular components to maintain homeostasis. It can target protein aggregates, superfluous biomolecular complexes, dysfunctional and damaged organelles, as well as pathogenic intracellular microbes. Autophagy is a dynamic process in which the different stages from initiation to final degradation of cargo are finely regulated. Therefore, the study of this process requires the use of a palette of techniques, which are continuously evolving and whose interpretation is not trivial...
July 3, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28665306/standard-immunohistochemical-assays-to-assess-autophagy-in-mammalian-tissue
#7
REVIEW
Wim Martinet, Lynn Roth, Guido R Y De Meyer
Autophagy is a highly conserved lysosomal degradation pathway with major impact on diverse human pathologies. Despite the development of different methodologies to detect autophagy both in vitro and in vivo, monitoring autophagy in tissue via immunohistochemical techniques is hampered due to the lack of biomarkers. Immunohistochemical detection of a punctate pattern of ATG8/MAP1LC3 proteins is currently the most frequently used approach to detect autophagy in situ, but it depends on a highly sensitive detection method and is prone to misinterpretation...
June 30, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28657591/assessing-autophagy-in-mouse-models-and-patients-with-systemic-autoimmune-diseases
#8
REVIEW
Fengjuan Wang, Baihui Li, Nicolas Schall, Maud Wilhelm, Sylviane Muller
Autophagy is a tightly regulated mechanism that allows cells to renew themselves through the lysosomal degradation of proteins, which are misfolded or produced in excess, and of damaged organelles. In the context of immunity, recent research has specially attempted to clarify its roles in infection, inflammation and autoimmunity. Autophagy has emerged as a spotlight in several molecular pathways and trafficking events that participate to innate and adaptive immunity. Deregulation of autophagy has been associated to several autoimmune diseases, in particular to systemic lupus erythematosus...
June 28, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629193/telomere-biology-insights-into-an-intriguing-phenomenon
#9
REVIEW
Shriram Venkatesan, Aik Kia Khaw, Manoor Prakash Hande
Bacteria and viruses possess circular DNA, whereas eukaryotes with typically very large DNA molecules have had to evolve into linear chromosomes to circumvent the problem of supercoiling circular DNA of that size. Consequently, such organisms possess telomeres to cap chromosome ends. Telomeres are essentially tandem repeats of any DNA sequence that are present at the ends of chromosomes. Their biology has been an enigmatic one, involving various molecules interacting dynamically in an evolutionarily well-trimmed fashion...
June 19, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594368/methods-for-measuring-autophagy-in-mice
#10
REVIEW
Manon Moulis, Cécile Vindis
Autophagy is a dynamic intracellular process that mediates the degradation of damaged cytoplasmic components by the lysosome. This process plays important roles in maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and energy balance. Measuring autophagy activity is critical and although the determination of autophagic flux in isolated cells is well documented, there is a need to have reliable and quantitative assays to evaluate autophagy in whole organisms. Because mouse models have been precious in establishing the functional significance of autophagy under physiological or pathological conditions, we present in this chapter a compendium of the current available methods to measure autophagy in mice, and discuss their advantages and limitations...
June 8, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574446/activation-of-the-egf-receptor-by-ligand-binding-and-oncogenic-mutations-the-rotation-model
#11
REVIEW
Endang R Purba, Ei-Ichiro Saita, Ichiro N Maruyama
The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays vital roles in cellular processes including cell proliferation, survival, motility, and differentiation. The dysregulated activation of the receptor is often implicated in human cancers. EGFR is synthesized as a single-pass transmembrane protein, which consists of an extracellular ligand-binding domain and an intracellular kinase domain separated by a single transmembrane domain. The receptor is activated by a variety of polypeptide ligands such as epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor α...
June 2, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28486418/major-tumor-suppressor-and-oncogenic-non-coding-rnas-clinical-relevance-in-lung-cancer
#12
REVIEW
Kentaro Inamura
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, yet there remains a lack of specific and sensitive tools for early diagnosis and targeted therapies. High-throughput sequencing techniques revealed that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), e.g., microRNAs and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), represent more than 80% of the transcribed human genome. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs and lncRNAs regulate target genes and play an important role in biological processes and signaling pathways in malignancies, including lung cancer...
May 9, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471392/taking-a-bad-turn-compromised-dna-damage-response-in-leukemia
#13
REVIEW
Nadine Nilles, Birthe Fahrenkrog
Genomic integrity is of outmost importance for the survival at the cellular and the organismal level and key to human health. To ensure the integrity of their DNA, cells have evolved maintenance programs collectively known as the DNA damage response. Particularly challenging for genome integrity are DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and defects in their repair are often associated with human disease, including leukemia. Defective DSB repair may not only be disease-causing, but further contribute to poor treatment outcome and poor prognosis in leukemia...
May 4, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441765/distinct-fiber-type-signature-in-mouse-muscles-expressing-a-mutant-lamin-a-responsible-for-congenital-muscular-dystrophy-in-a-patient
#14
Alice Barateau, Nathalie Vadrot, Onnik Agbulut, Patrick Vicart, Sabrina Batonnet-Pichon, Brigitte Buendia
Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations...
April 24, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346356/microinjection-of-antibodies-targeting-the-lamin-a-c-histone-binding-site-blocks-mitotic-entry-and-reveals-separate-chromatin-interactions-with-hp1-cenpb-and-pml
#15
Charles R Dixon, Melpomeni Platani, Alexandr A Makarov, Eric C Schirmer
Lamins form a scaffold lining the nucleus that binds chromatin and contributes to spatial genome organization; however, due to the many other functions of lamins, studies knocking out or altering the lamin polymer cannot clearly distinguish between direct and indirect effects. To overcome this obstacle, we specifically targeted the mapped histone-binding site of A/C lamins by microinjecting antibodies specific to this region predicting that this would make the genome more mobile. No increase in chromatin mobility was observed; however, interestingly, injected cells failed to go through mitosis, while control antibody-injected cells did...
March 25, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28304334/kdm2-family-members-are-regulated-by-hif-1-in-hypoxia
#16
Michael Batie, Jimena Druker, Laura D'Ignazio, Sonia Rocha
Hypoxia is not only a developmental cue but also a stress and pathological stimulus in many human diseases. The response to hypoxia at the cellular level relies on the activity of the transcription factor family, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). HIF-1 is responsible for the acute response and transactivates a variety of genes involved in cellular metabolism, cell death, and cell growth. Here, we show that hypoxia results in increased mRNA levels for human lysine (K)-specific demethylase 2 (KDM2) family members, KDM2A and KDM2B, and also for Drosophila melanogaster KDM2, a histone and protein demethylase...
March 17, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28282903/application-of-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-technology-to-the-study-of-hematological-diseases
#17
REVIEW
Mailin Li, Pasquale Cascino, Simone Ummarino, Annalisa Di Ruscio
The burst of reprogramming technology in recent years has revolutionized the field of stem cell biology, offering new opportunities for personalized, regenerative therapies. The direct reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided an invaluable tool to study and model a wide range of human diseases. Here, we review the transforming potential of such a strategy in research and in therapies applicable to the hematology field.
March 8, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208600/invariant-chain-complexes-and-clusters-as-platforms-for-mif-signaling
#18
REVIEW
Robert Lindner
Invariant chain (Ii/CD74) has been identified as a surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Most cells that express Ii also synthesize major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules, which depend on Ii as a chaperone and a targeting factor. The assembly of nonameric complexes consisting of one Ii trimer and three MHC II molecules (each of which is a heterodimer) has been regarded as a prerequisite for efficient delivery to the cell surface. Due to rapid endocytosis, however, only low levels of Ii-MHC II complexes are displayed on the cell surface of professional antigen presenting cells and very little free Ii trimers...
February 10, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28178187/may-i-cut-in-gene-editing-approaches-in-human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cells
#19
REVIEW
Nicholas Brookhouser, Sreedevi Raman, Christopher Potts, David A Brafman
In the decade since Yamanaka and colleagues described methods to reprogram somatic cells into a pluripotent state, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have demonstrated tremendous promise in numerous disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, the development and refinement of advanced gene transduction and editing technologies have further accelerated the potential of hiPSCs. In this review, we discuss the various gene editing technologies that are being implemented with hiPSCs...
February 6, 2017: Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157165/stem-cell-therapies-in-retinal-disorders
#20
REVIEW
Aakriti Garg, Jin Yang, Winston Lee, Stephen H Tsang
Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients' diseases...
February 2, 2017: Cells
journal
journal
47588
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"