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Brain Sciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28640199/the-role-of-peripheral-cns-directed-antibodies-in-promoting-inflammatory-cns-demyelination
#1
REVIEW
Silke Kinzel, Martin S Weber
In central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and related NMO-spectrum disorders (NMO-SD), a pathogenic role for antibodies is primarily projected into enhancing ongoing CNS inflammation by directly binding to target antigens within the CNS. This scenario is supported at least in part, by antibodies in conjunction with complement activation in the majority of MS lesions and by deposition of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) antibodies in areas of astrocyte loss in patients with classical NMO...
June 22, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629158/contribution-of-the-degeneration-of-the-neuro-axonal-unit-to-the-pathogenesis-of-multiple-sclerosis
#2
REVIEW
Hannah E Salapa, Sangmin Lee, Yoojin Shin, Michael C Levin
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. In recent years, it has become more evident that neurodegeneration, including neuronal damage and axonal injury, underlies permanent disability in MS. This manuscript reviews some of the mechanisms that could be responsible for neurodegeneration and axonal damage in MS and highlights the potential role that dysfunctional heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) and antibodies to hnRNP A1 may play in MS pathogenesis...
June 18, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621758/brain-magnetic-resonance-imaging-mri-as-a-potential-biomarker-for-parkinson-s-disease-pd
#3
REVIEW
Paul Tuite
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to serve as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the type or types of biomarker it could provide remain to be determined. At this time there is not sufficient sensitivity or specificity for MRI to serve as an early diagnostic biomarker, i.e., it is unproven in its ability to determine if a single individual is normal, has mild PD, or has some other forms of degenerative parkinsonism. However there is accumulating evidence that MRI may be useful in staging and monitoring disease progression (staging biomarker), and also possibly as a means to monitor pathophysiological aspects of disease and associated response to treatments, i...
June 16, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621715/neuropsychiatric-burden-in-huntington-s-disease
#4
REVIEW
Ricardo Augusto Paoli, Andrea Botturi, Andrea Ciammola, Vincenzo Silani, Cecilia Prunas, Claudio Lucchiari, Elisa Zugno, Elisabetta Caletti
Huntington's disease is a disorder that results in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric problems. The symptoms often take different forms and the presence of disturbances of the psychic sphere reduces patients' autonomy and quality of life, also impacting patients' social life. It is estimated that a prevalence between 33% and 76% of the main psychiatric syndromes may arise in different phases of the disease, often in atypical form, even 20 years before the onset of chorea and dementia. We present a narrative review of the literature describing the main psychopathological patterns that may be found in Huntington's disease, searching for a related article in the main database sources (Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and Medscape)...
June 16, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28617347/repetitive-behaviours-and-restricted-interests-in-individuals-with-down-syndrome-one-way-of-managing-their-world
#5
Sheila Glenn
This paper argues that the repetitive behaviour and restrictive interests (RBRI) displayed by individuals with Down syndrome have mostly positive functions. However, as research has developed from interests in Obsessional Compulsive Disorder or Autistic Spectrum Disorder, unfortunately a view has arisen that RBRI in individuals with Down syndrome are also likely to be pathological. This is particularly the case in adults. The paper reviews: (a) measures employed and the perspectives that have been used; (b) the development in typically developing individuals, those with Down syndrome, and those with other conditions associated with intellectual disability; (c) positive and possible negative effects of RBRI; and (d) the need for more research...
June 15, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608801/automaticity-and-flexibility-of-s-r-retrieval-during-priming
#6
Hope Tobin, Elizabeth Race
Learned associations between stimuli and responses (S-R associations) make important contributions to behavioral and neural priming. The current study investigated the automaticity and flexibility of these S-R associations and whether the global task context in which they occur modulates the impact of S-R retrieval on priming. Participants engaged in a semantic repetition priming task in which S-R retrieval is known to influence priming. Across participants, repetition priming occurred in global task contexts (i...
June 13, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28604606/evaluation-of-visual-evoked-cerebral-metabolic-rate-of-oxygen-as-a-diagnostic-marker-in-multiple-sclerosis
#7
Nicholas A Hubbard, Yoel Sanchez Araujo, Camila Caballero, Minhui Ouyang, Monroe P Turner, Lyndahl Himes, Shawheen Faghihahmadabadi, Binu P Thomas, John Hart, Hao Huang, Darin T Okuda, Bart Rypma
A multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis often relies upon clinical presentation and qualitative analysis of standard, magnetic resonance brain images. However, the accuracy of MS diagnoses can be improved by utilizing advanced brain imaging methods. We assessed the accuracy of a new neuroimaging marker, visual-evoked cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (veCMRO₂), in classifying MS patients and closely age- and sex-matched healthy control (HC) participants. MS patients and HCs underwent calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (cfMRI) during a visual stimulation task, diffusion tensor imaging, T₁- and T₂-weighted imaging, neuropsychological testing, and completed self-report questionnaires...
June 11, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590448/striatal-vulnerability-in-huntington-s-disease-neuroprotection-versus-neurotoxicity
#8
REVIEW
Ryoma Morigaki, Satoshi Goto
Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (PolyQ) in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. In HD, striking neuropathological changes occur in the striatum, including loss of medium spiny neurons and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons accompanied by neurodegeneration of the striosome and matrix compartments, leading to progressive impairment of reasoning, walking and speaking abilities...
June 7, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28587295/postnatal-migration-of-cerebellar-interneurons
#9
REVIEW
Ludovic Galas, Magalie Bénard, Alexis Lebon, Yutaro Komuro, Damien Schapman, Hubert Vaudry, David Vaudry, Hitoshi Komuro
Due to its continuing development after birth, the cerebellum represents a unique model for studying the postnatal orchestration of interneuron migration. The combination of fluorescent labeling and ex/in vivo imaging revealed a cellular highway network within cerebellar cortical layers (the external granular layer, the molecular layer, the Purkinje cell layer, and the internal granular layer). During the first two postnatal weeks, saltatory movements, transient stop phases, cell-cell interaction/contact, and degradation of the extracellular matrix mark out the route of cerebellar interneurons, notably granule cells and basket/stellate cells, to their final location...
June 6, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574442/electrophysiological-indices-of-audiovisual-speech-perception-in-the-broader-autism-phenotype
#10
Julia Irwin, Trey Avery, Jacqueline Turcios, Lawrence Brancazio, Barbara Cook, Nicole Landi
When a speaker talks, the consequences of this can both be heard (audio) and seen (visual). A novel visual phonemic restoration task was used to assess behavioral discrimination and neural signatures (event-related potentials, or ERP) of audiovisual processing in typically developing children with a range of social and communicative skills assessed using the social responsiveness scale, a measure of traits associated with autism. An auditory oddball design presented two types of stimuli to the listener, a clear exemplar of an auditory consonant-vowel syllable /ba/ (the more frequently occurring standard stimulus), and a syllable in which the auditory cues for the consonant were substantially weakened, creating a stimulus which is more like /a/ (the infrequently presented deviant stimulus)...
June 2, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574429/validation-of-acoustic-wave-induced-traumatic-brain-injury-in-rats
#11
Sean Berman, Toni L Uhlendorf, David K Mills, Elliot B Lander, Mark H Berman, Randy W Cohen
BACKGROUND: This study looked to validate the acoustic wave technology of the Storz-D-Actor that inflicted a consistent closed-head, traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. We studied a range of single pulse pressures administered to the rats and observed the resulting decline in motor skills and memory. Histology was observed to measure and confirm the injury insult. METHODS: Four different acoustic wave pressures were studied using a single pulse: 0, 3.4, 4.2 and 5...
June 2, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574423/toward-a-multifactorial-conception-of-the-gilles-de-la-tourette-syndrome-and-persistent-chronic-tic-disorder
#12
EDITORIAL
Marc E Lavoie, Kieron O'Connor
Despite recent giant leaps in understanding Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (now Tourette Disorder in the DSM 5), accurate multi-modal description, rigorous assessment procedures, and the improvement of evidence-based treatment currently pose a considerable challenge. In this context, the current special edition aims to elaborate three important dimensions in Tourette Disorder. Firstly, the effective characterization and etiological basis of the disorder are reviewed, since such characterization impacts accurate assessment...
June 2, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28561761/a-review-of-issues-related-to-data-acquisition-and-analysis-in-eeg-meg-studies
#13
REVIEW
Aina Puce, Matti S Hämäläinen
Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are non-invasive electrophysiological methods, which record electric potentials and magnetic fields due to electric currents in synchronously-active neurons. With MEG being more sensitive to neural activity from tangential currents and EEG being able to detect both radial and tangential sources, the two methods are complementary. Over the years, neurophysiological studies have changed considerably: high-density recordings are becoming de rigueur; there is interest in both spontaneous and evoked activity; and sophisticated artifact detection and removal methods are available...
May 31, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555009/acute-regression-in-young-people-with-down-syndrome
#14
Clotilde Mircher, Cécile Cieuta-Walti, Isabelle Marey, Anne-Sophie Rebillat, Laura Cretu, Eliane Milenko, Martine Conte, Franck Sturtz, Marie-Odile Rethore, Aimé Ravel
Abstract: Adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) can present a rapid regression with loss of independence and daily skills. Causes of regression are unknown and treatment is most of the time symptomatic. We did a retrospective cohort study of regression cases: patients were born between 1959 and 2000, and were followed from 1984 to now. We found 30 DS patients aged 11 to 30 years old with history of regression. Regression occurred regardless of the cognitive level (severe, moderate, or mild intellectual disability (ID))...
May 27, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545247/how-does-psychosocial-behavior-contribute-to-cognitive-health-in-old-age
#15
Robert S Wilson, David A Bennett
With the aging of the U.S. population, the number of cognitively disabled persons is expected to substantially increase in coming decades, underscoring the urgent need for effective interventions. Here, we review the current evidence linking psychosocial factors to late-life cognitive loss and consider the study design needed to illuminate the biologic bases of the associations. We then examine an ongoing study that includes several of the key design elements, the Rush Memory and Aging Project. In this longitudinal clinical-pathological cohort study, indicators of personality, social connectedness, and psychological well-being were shown to predict late-life cognitive outcomes...
May 23, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545237/emotion-recognition-in-adolescents-with-down-syndrome-a-nonverbal-approach
#16
Régis Pochon, Claire Touchet, Laure Ibernon
Several studies have reported that persons with Down syndrome (DS) have difficulties recognizing emotions; however, there is insufficient research to prove that a deficit of emotional knowledge exists in DS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recognition of emotional facial expressions without making use of emotional vocabulary, given the language problems known to be associated with this syndrome. The ability to recognize six emotions was assessed in 24 adolescents with DS. Their performance was compared to that of 24 typically developing children with the same nonverbal-developmental age, as assessed by Raven's Progressive Matrices...
May 23, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28505103/neuronal-migration-and-auts2-syndrome
#17
REVIEW
Kei Hori, Mikio Hoshino
Neuronal migration is one of the pivotal steps to form a functional brain, and disorganization of this process is believed to underlie the pathology of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy. However, it is not clear how abnormal neuronal migration causes mental dysfunction. Recently, a key gene for various psychiatric diseases, the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2), has been shown to regulate neuronal migration, which gives new insight into understanding this question...
May 14, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28475113/genetic-and-molecular-approaches-to-study-neuronal-migration-in-the-developing-cerebral-cortex
#18
REVIEW
Jacobus J Dudok, Pim E G Leonards, Jan Wijnholds
The migration of neuronal cells in the developing cerebral cortex is essential for proper development of the brain and brain networks. Disturbances in this process, due to genetic abnormalities or exogenous factors, leads to aberrant brain formation, brain network formation, and brain function. In the last decade, there has been extensive research in the field of neuronal migration. In this review, we describe different methods and approaches to assess and study neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex...
May 5, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28468265/verbs-in-mothers-input-to-six-month-olds-synchrony-between-presentation-meaning-and-actions-is-related-to-later-verb-acquisition
#19
Iris Nomikou, Monique Koke, Katharina J Rohlfing
In embodied theories on language, it is widely accepted that experience in acting generates an expectation of this action when hearing the word for it. However, how this expectation emerges during language acquisition is still not well understood. Assuming that the intermodal presentation of information facilitates perception, prior research had suggested that early in infancy, mothers perform their actions in temporal synchrony with language. Further research revealed that this synchrony is a form of multimodal responsive behavior related to the child's later language development...
April 29, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28468235/in-search-of-sleep-biomarkers-of-alzheimer-s-disease-k-complexes-do-not-discriminate-between-patients-with-mild-cognitive-impairment-and-healthy-controls
#20
Flaminia Reda, Maurizio Gorgoni, Giulia Lauri, Ilaria Truglia, Susanna Cordone, Serena Scarpelli, Anastasia Mangiaruga, Aurora D'Atri, Michele Ferrara, Giordano Lacidogna, Camillo Marra, Paolo Maria Rossini, Luigi De Gennaro
The K-complex (KC) is one of the hallmarks of Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. Recent observations point to a drastic decrease of spontaneous KCs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, no study has investigated when, in the development of AD, this phenomenon starts. The assessment of KC density in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical condition considered a possible transitional stage between normal cognitive function and probable AD, is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to compare KC density in AD/MCI patients and healthy controls (HCs), also assessing the relationship between KC density and cognitive decline...
April 29, 2017: Brain Sciences
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