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Biomolecules

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28704927/the-tor-signaling-network-in-the-model-unicellular-green-alga-chlamydomonas-reinhardtii
#1
REVIEW
María Esther Pérez-Pérez, Inmaculada Couso, José L Crespo
Cell growth is tightly coupled to nutrient availability. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase transmits nutritional and environmental cues to the cellular growth machinery. TOR functions in two distinct multiprotein complexes, termed TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). While the structure and functions of TORC1 are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, including algae and plants, TORC2 core proteins seem to be missing in photosynthetic organisms. TORC1 controls cell growth by promoting anabolic processes, including protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis, and inhibiting catabolic processes such as autophagy...
July 12, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28696357/myc-driven-pathways-in-breast-cancer-subtypes
#2
REVIEW
Yassi Fallah, Janetta Brundage, Paul Allegakoen, Ayesha N Shajahan-Haq
The transcription factor MYC (MYC proto-oncogene, bHLH transcription factor) is an essential signaling hub in multiple cellular processes that sustain growth of many types of cancers. MYC regulates expression of RNA, both protein and non-coding, that control central metabolic pathways, cell death, proliferation, differentiation, stress pathways, and mechanisms of drug resistance. Activation of MYC has been widely reported in breast cancer progression. Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and treatment options are primarily guided by histological and biochemical evaluations of the tumors...
July 11, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28686223/regulation-of-autophagy-through-torc1-and-mtorc1
#3
REVIEW
Takeshi Noda
Autophagy is an intracellular protein-degradation process that is conserved across eukaryotes including yeast and humans. Under nutrient starvation conditions, intracellular proteins are transported to lysosomes and vacuoles via membranous structures known as autophagosomes, and are degraded. The various steps of autophagy are regulated by the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1/mTORC1). In this review, a history of this regulation and recent advances in such regulation both in yeast and mammals will be discussed...
July 7, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28686218/lysosomal-regulation-of-mtorc1-by-amino-acids-in-mammalian-cells
#4
REVIEW
Yao Yao, Edith Jones, Ken Inoki
The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth in eukaryotic cells. The active mTORC1 promotes cellular anabolic processes including protein, pyrimidine, and lipid biosynthesis, and inhibits catabolic processes such as autophagy. Consistent with its growth-promoting functions, hyper-activation of mTORC1 signaling is one of the important pathomechanisms underlying major human health problems including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The mTORC1 receives multiple upstream signals such as an abundance of amino acids and growth factors, thus it regulates a wide range of downstream events relevant to cell growth and proliferation control...
July 7, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671615/torc1-dependent-phosphorylation-targets-in-fission-yeast
#5
REVIEW
Yoko Otsubo, Akio Nakashima, Masayuki Yamamoto, Akira Yamashita
Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase controls cell metabolism and growth in response to environmental cues such as nutrients, growth factors, and stress. TOR kinase is widely conserved across eukaryotes. As in other organisms, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has two types of TOR complex, namely TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. It is interesting that the two TOR complexes in S. pombe have opposite roles in sexual differentiation, which is induced by nutrient starvation. TORC1, which contains Tor2 as a catalytic subunit, promotes vegetative growth and represses sexual differentiation in nutrient-rich conditions, while TORC2 is required for the initiation of sexual differentiation...
July 3, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671612/mutations-in-cancer-cause-gain-of-cysteine-histidine-and-tryptophan-at-the-expense-of-a-net-loss-of-arginine-on-the-proteome-level
#6
Viktoriia Tsuber, Yunus Kadamov, Lars Brautigam, Ulrika Warpman Berglund, Thomas Helleday
Accumulation of somatic mutations is critical for the transition of a normal cell to become cancerous. Mutations cause amino acid substitutions that change properties of proteins. However, it has not been studied as to what extent the composition and accordingly chemical properties of the cell proteome is altered as a result of the increased mutation load in cancer. Here, we analyzed data on amino acid substitutions caused by mutations in about 2000 protein coding genes from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia that contains information on nucleotide and amino acid alterations in 782 cancer cell lines, and validated the analysis with information on amino acid substitutions for the same set of proteins in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC; v78) in circa 18,000 tumor samples...
July 3, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671578/preparation-of-self-assembled-chitin-nanofiber-natural-rubber-composite-sheets-and-porous-materials
#7
Akito Kawano, Kazuya Yamamoto, Jun-Ichi Kadokawa
We previously reported the preparation of a self-assembled chitin nanofiber (CNF) film via regeneration from an ion gel with an ionic liquid, followed by sonication and filtration. Based on the finding that CNFs were redispersed in a mixture of the film with ammonia aqueous solution (aq.), in this study, CNF-natural rubber (NR) composite sheets were fabricated by mixing redispersed CNF with NR latex stabilized by ammonia, followed by drying under reduced pressure. Tensile testing of the sheets indicated the reinforcing effect of CNFs...
July 1, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28661450/functional-amyloids-in-reproduction
#8
REVIEW
Aveline Hewetson, Hoa Quynh Do, Caitlyn Myers, Archana Muthusubramanian, Roger Bryan Sutton, Benjamin J Wylie, Gail A Cornwall
Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction...
June 29, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28672843/applications-of-functional-amyloids-from-fungi-surface-modification-by-class-i-hydrophobins
#9
REVIEW
Alessandra Piscitelli, Paola Cicatiello, Alfredo Maria Gravagnuolo, Ilaria Sorrentino, Cinzia Pezzella, Paola Giardina
Class I hydrophobins produced from fungi are amongst the first proteins recognized as functional amyloids. They are amphiphilic proteins involved in the formation of aerial structures such as spores or fruiting bodies. They form chemically robust layers which can only be dissolved in strong acids. These layers adhere to different surfaces, changing their wettability, and allow the binding of other proteins. Herein, the modification of diverse types of surfaces with Class I hydrophobins is reported, highlighting the applications of the coated surfaces...
June 26, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629183/an-amyloidogenic-sequence-at-the-n-terminus-of-the-androgen-receptor-impacts-polyglutamine-aggregation
#10
Emmanuel Oppong, Gunter Stier, Miriam Gaal, Rebecca Seeger, Melanie Stoeck, Marc-André Delsuc, Andrew C B Cato, Bruno Kieffer
The human androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand inducible transcription factor that harbors an amino terminal domain (AR-NTD) with a ligand-independent activation function. AR-NTD is intrinsically disordered and displays aggregation properties conferred by the presence of a poly-glutamine (polyQ) sequence. The length of the polyQ sequence as well as its adjacent sequence motifs modulate this aggregation property. AR-NTD also contains a conserved KELCKAVSVSM sequence motif that displays an intrinsic property to form amyloid fibrils under mild oxidative conditions...
June 19, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608840/sequence-identification-recombinant-production-and-analysis-of-the-self-assembly-of-egg-stalk-silk-proteins-from-lacewing-chrysoperla-carnea
#11
Martin Neuenfeldt, Thomas Scheibel
Egg stalk silks of the common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea likely comprise at least three different silk proteins. Based on the natural spinning process, it was hypothesized that these proteins self-assemble without shear stress, as adult lacewings do not use a spinneret. To examine this, the first sequence identification and determination of the gene expression profile of several silk proteins and various transcript variants thereof was conducted, and then the three major proteins were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli encoded by their native complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences...
June 13, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28598359/vitamin-b12-and-semen-quality
#12
REVIEW
Saleem Ali Banihani
Various studies have revealed the effects of vitamin B12, also named cobalamin, on semen quality and sperm physiology; however, these studies collectively are still unsummarized. Here, we systematically discuss and summarize the currently understood role of vitamin B12 on semen quality and sperm physiology. We searched the Web of Science, PubMed, and Scopus databases for only English language articles or abstracts from September 1961 to March 2017 (inclusive) using the key words "vitamin B12" and "cobalamin" versus "sperm"...
June 9, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28587176/bifunctional-enzyme-jmjd6-contributes-to-multiple-disease-pathogenesis-new-twist-on-the-old-story
#13
REVIEW
Shiva Shankar Vangimalla, Murali Ganesan, Kusum K Kharbanda, Natalia A Osna
Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) is a non-heme Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenase with arginine demethylase and lysyl hydroxylase activities. Its initial discovery as a dispensable phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) in the cell membrane of macrophages for phagocytosis was squashed by newer studies which revealed its nuclear localization and bifunctional enzymatic activity. Though its interaction with several nuclear and cytoplasmic target proteins has been demonstrated, the exact mechanisms and clinical significance of these various biologic interplays are not yet well established...
June 1, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28498360/meristem-plant-cells-as-a-sustainable-source-of-redox-actives-for-skin-rejuvenation
#14
REVIEW
Liudmila G Korkina, Wolfgang Mayer, Chiara de Luca
Recently, aggressive advertisement claimed a "magic role" for plant stem cells in human skin rejuvenation. This review aims to shed light on the scientific background suggesting feasibility of using plant cells as a basis of anti-age cosmetics. When meristem cell cultures obtained from medicinal plants are exposed to appropriate elicitors/stressors (ultraviolet, ultrasound ultraviolet (UV), ultrasonic waves, microbial/insect metabolites, heavy metals, organic toxins, nutrient deprivation, etc.), a protective/adaptive response initiates the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites...
May 12, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471404/trml-and-tusa-are-necessary-for-rpos-and-miaa-is-required-for-hfq-expression-in-escherichia-coli
#15
Joseph I Aubee, Morenike Olu, Karl M Thompson
Previous work demonstrated that efficient RNA Polymerase sigma S-subunit (RpoS) translation requires the N6-isopentenyladenosine i6A37 transfer RNA (tRNA) modification for UUX-Leu decoding. Here we investigate the effect of two additional tRNA modification systems on RpoS translation; the analysis was also extended to another High UUX-leucine codon (HULC) protein, Host Factor for phage Qβ (Hfq). One tRNA modification, the addition of the 2'-O-methylcytidine/uridine 34 (C/U34m) tRNA modification by tRNA (cytidine/uridine-2'O)-ribose methyltransferase L (TrmL), requires the presence of the N⁶-isopentenyladenosine 37 (i⁶A37) and therefore it seemed possible that the defect in RpoS translation in the absence of i⁶A37 prenyl transferase (MiaA) was in fact due to the inability to add the C/U34m modification to UUX-Leu tRNAs...
May 4, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406433/diversity-of-amyloid-motifs-in-nlr-signaling-in-fungi
#16
REVIEW
Antoine Loquet, Sven J Saupe
Amyloid folds not only represent the underlying cause of a large class of human diseases but also display a variety of functional roles both in prokaryote and eukaryote organisms. Among these roles is a recently-described activity in signal transduction cascades functioning in host defense and programmed cell death and involving Nod-like receptors (NLRs). In different fungal species, prion amyloid folds convey activation signals from a receptor protein to an effector domain by an amyloid templating and propagation mechanism...
April 13, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398221/amyloid-fibrils-from-hemoglobin
#17
Nadishka Jayawardena, Manmeet Kaur, Smitha Nair, Jenny Malmstrom, David Goldstone, Leonardo Negron, Juliet A Gerrard, Laura J Domigan
Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood...
April 11, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383498/quef-like-a-non-homologous-archaeosine-synthase-from-the-crenarchaeota
#18
Adriana Bon Ramos, Lide Bao, Ben Turner, Valérie de Crécy-Lagard, Dirk Iwata-Reuyl
Archaeosine (G⁺) is a structurally complex modified nucleoside ubiquitous to the Archaea, where it is found in the D-loop of virtually all archaeal transfer RNA (tRNA). Its unique structure, which includes a formamidine group that carries a formal positive charge, and location in the tRNA, led to the proposal that it serves a key role in stabilizing tRNA structure. Although G⁺ is limited to the Archaea, it is structurally related to the bacterial modified nucleoside queuosine, and the two share homologous enzymes for the early steps of their biosynthesis...
April 6, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28375166/trna-modifications-impact-on-structure-and-thermal-adaptation
#19
REVIEW
Christian Lorenz, Christina E Lünse, Mario Mörl
Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are central players in translation, functioning as adapter molecules between the informational level of nucleic acids and the functional level of proteins. They show a highly conserved secondary and tertiary structure and the highest density of post-transcriptional modifications among all RNAs. These modifications concentrate in two hotspots-the anticodon loop and the tRNA core region, where the D- and T-loop interact with each other, stabilizing the overall structure of the molecule. These modifications can cause large rearrangements as well as local fine-tuning in the 3D structure of a tRNA...
April 4, 2017: Biomolecules
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346397/the-process-and-regulatory-components-of-inflammation-in-brain-oncogenesis
#20
REVIEW
A G M Mostofa, Surendra R Punganuru, Hanumantha Rao Madala, Mohammad Al-Obaide, Kalkunte S Srivenugopal
Central nervous system tumors comprising the primary cancers and brain metastases remain the most lethal neoplasms and challenging to treat. Substantial evidence points to a paramount role for inflammation in the pathology leading to gliomagenesis, malignant progression and tumor aggressiveness in the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment. This review summarizes the salient contributions of oxidative stress, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenases, and transcription factors such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and the associated cross-talks to the inflammatory signaling in CNS cancers...
March 27, 2017: Biomolecules
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