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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806049/electrolytes-oral-electrolyte-solutions
#1
Lisa Harris
Oral electrolyte solutions are used widely for rehydration in diarrheal illness and to maintain hydration during vigorous exercise. In diarrheal illness, an oral rehydration solution (ORS) typically is preferred over intravenous fluids except for patients with severe dehydration. The preferred ORS is one similar to the glucose-containing reduced osmolarity World Health Organization ORS. There also are polymer-based solutions that use rice or wheat as the source of carbohydrates but these are not widely recommended...
August 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806048/electrolytes-calcium-disorders
#2
Craig Barstow
A normal serum calcium level is 8 to 10 mg/dL. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia (ie, levels 10.5 mg/dL or greater) should be confirmed with an albumin-adjusted or ionized calcium level. The two most common causes of hypercalcemia are hyperparathyroidism and malignancy. Drugs, notably lithium and thiazide diuretics, also can cause hypercalcemia. Patients with severe or symptomatic hypercalcemia should be treated initially with hydration to decrease calcium levels. The evaluation should include a parathyroid hormone (PTH) level...
August 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806047/electrolytes-potassium-disorders
#3
Taiwona L Elliott
Hypokalemia (ie, potassium levels less than 3.5 mEq/L) occurs in fewer than 1% of healthy individuals, but is present in up to 20% of hospitalized patients, 40% of patients taking diuretics, and 17% of patients with cardiovascular conditions. Hypokalemia often is asymptomatic; symptoms are more common in older adults. Common symptoms are cardiac arrhythmias and muscle weakness or pain. Management consists of intravenous potassium replacement during cardiac monitoring for patients with marked symptoms, echocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities, or severe hypokalemia (ie, level less than 3...
August 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806046/electrolytes-sodium-disorders
#4
Michael M Braun, Megan Mahowald
Sodium disorders (ie, hyponatremia, hypernatremia) are common electrolyte disturbances in clinical medicine and are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Etiologies of hyponatremia are classified into four categories. The first is pseudohyponatremia, in which the sodium level is low due to hyperproteinemia, hyperlipidemia, or hyperglycemia. The other three categories are based on overall patient fluid status and include hypovolemic (commonly due to fluid loss), hypervolemic (commonly due to fluid retention from heart failure, cirrhosis, or renal failure), and euvolemic (most often because of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone)...
August 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806045/electrolytes-foreword
#5
Barry D Weiss
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28682049/upper-gastrointestinal-conditions-gallbladder-conditions
#6
Ku-Lang Chang, David S Estores
Asymptomatic patients with gallstones typically do not require treatment. Surgical intervention is indicated in most symptomatic patients with gallstones. For patients with uncomplicated cholecystitis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed within 24 hours of admission is associated with significantly decreased morbidity, hospital length of stay, and cost. Most gallbladder polyps are found incidentally during ultrasonography. Patients with gallbladder polyps are at increased risk of malignant transformation if they are older than 50 years; the gallbladder wall is thickened; or the polyp is adenomatous, solitary, larger than 10 mm, sessile in appearance, or has a rapid increase in size...
July 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28682048/upper-gastrointestinal-conditions-pancreatitis
#7
Ku-Lang Chang, David S Estores
The most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (particularly 5 mm or smaller) and alcohol consumption. The serum amylase level may be normal in up to one-fifth of patients with acute pancreatitis; therefore, this level by itself is not a reliable diagnostic factor. The serum lipase level has a higher positive predictive value and specificity compared with the amylase level. Acute biliary pancreatitis with evidence of cholangitis represents an emergency indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with endoscopic sphincterotomy within 24 hours of presentation...
July 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28682047/upper-gastrointestinal-conditions-nonmalignant-conditions-of-the-stomach
#8
Ku-Lang Chang, David S Estores
Functional dyspepsia can be categorized into two syndromes: postprandial distress syndrome and epigastric pain syndrome. Helicobacter pyloriinfection is one of the most common chronic infections worldwide. Acute H pylori infection causes dyspepsia, and chronic infection can cause peptic ulcer disease. H pylori also is one of the causative agents in gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The incidence of H pylori infection varies among different ethnic populations and geographic locations...
July 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28682046/upper-gastrointestinal-conditions-nonmalignant-conditions-of-the-esophagus
#9
David S Estores, Ku-Lang Chang
Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an allergic disorder of the esophagus. This diagnosis requires the presence of specific symptoms and a significantly elevated number of eosinophils in the esophageal lining as determined by endoscopic biopsies. Symptoms tend to be nonspecific among patients younger than 15 years. Among adults, dysphagia is the most common symptom. Comanagement with a gastroenterology subspecialist is essential, particularly for EE patients with a stricture. EE is commonly misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)...
July 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28682045/upper-gastrointestinal-conditions-foreword
#10
Mindy A Smith
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671807/valvular-heart-disease-in-adults-infective-endocarditis
#11
Zubair A Khan, Steven M Hollenberg
A variety of microorganisms can cause infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with native valves. Staphylococci and streptococci are most common in community-acquired IE; staphylococci are most common in nosocomial IE. Microbiology of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) depends on timing. Early-onset PVE (ie, 60 days or fewer postsurgery) typically is nosocomial, with Staphylococcus aureus infection being most common. Intermediate-onset PVE (ie, 60 to 365 days postsurgery) typically involves a mix of nosocomial and non-nosocomial organisms...
June 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671806/valvular-heart-disease-in-adults-management-of-prosthetic-heart-valves
#12
John F Trujillo, Steven M Hollenberg
Patients undergoing cardiac valve replacement may receive mechanical or bioprosthetic valves. Mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulation but are durable and the need for a second surgery is up to eightfold times less than with bioprosthetic valves. Bioprosthetic valves do not require lifelong anticoagulation and thus are associated with fewer bleeding complications but they are less durable and associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in younger patients. Anticoagulation with mechanical valves is achieved using warfarin; use of direct-acting oral anticoagulants is not indicated...
June 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671805/valvular-heart-disease-in-adults-management-of-native-valve-disease
#13
Xin Zhang, Steven M Hollenberg
Patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) should be treated for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. They also should receive therapy for left ventricular dysfunction, undergo interval echocardiography, and participate in aerobic exercise. Valve replacement should be considered for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and syncope, presyncope, heart failure, angina, or severe AS with left ventricular dysfunction. Valve replacement is performed with open or transcatheter procedures; the latter are preferred for patients with high surgical risk...
June 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671804/valvular-heart-disease-in-adults-etiologies-classification-and-diagnosis
#14
Steven M Hollenberg
The prevalence of valvular heart disease (VHD) in the United States was estimated to be approximately 2.5% in the 1990s. The prevalence currently is thought to be increasing because of more accurate diagnostic methods and aging of the population. Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common valve defect, followed by aortic stenosis (AS) and aortic regurgitation (AR). Degenerative disease is the most common etiology of MR, AS, and AR, though these forms of VHD also can be caused by congenital valve defects, systemic inflammatory diseases, endocarditis, and many other conditions...
June 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671803/valvular-heart-disease-in-adults-foreword
#15
Steven M Hollenberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530383/diabetes-update-prevention-and-management-of-diabetes-complications
#16
REVIEW
Beth Choby
Macrovascular complications of diabetes include cardiovascular events, whereas common microvascular complications include neuropathy, retinopathy, and diabetic kidney disease. Control of hypertension and dyslipidemia is an important step in minimizing the risk of complications. Blood pressure (BP) levels should be maintained at less than 140 mm Hg systolic and less than 90 mm Hg diastolic. In older adults, medical therapy to reduce BP to less than 130/70 mm Hg is not recommended. In these patients, a systolic BP level less than 130 mm Hg has not been shown to improve atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes, and a diastolic BP less than 70 mm Hg is associated with a higher mortality risk...
May 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530382/diabetes-update-new-pharmacotherapy-for-type-2-diabetes
#17
REVIEW
Beth Choby
Multiple new drugs for managing type 2 diabetes have entered the market in the past 5 years. Guidelines from the American Diabetes Association recommend metformin for initial therapy, followed by a second drug if A1c goals are not met or initially for patients with A1c levels greater than 9%. Conversely, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends initial management with two drugs if the A1c level is greater than 7.5%. The risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin has been shown to be less than previously thought, with newer guidelines permitting use with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 45 to 60 mL/min/1...
May 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530381/diabetes-update-risk-factors-screening-diagnosis-and-prevention-of-type-2-diabetes
#18
REVIEW
Beth Choby
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of insulin resistance. Significant differences are noted in the prevalence of T2D among races. Screening recommendations vary by subspecialty society. Asian Americans should be screened for T2D at a lower body mass index (BMI) (ie, 23 kg/m(2)) than other racial groups. Risk factors for T2D include high-risk ethnicity, obesity, taking of certain drugs (including statins), and gestational diabetes. Health disparities and genetics also influence risk of T2D, although these complexities continue to be poorly understood...
May 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530380/diabetes-update-primary-care-of-patients-with-type-1-diabetes
#19
REVIEW
Beth Choby
The incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) are increasing among white, black, Hispanic, and Asian individuals in the United States. Children often present with acute symptoms, including severe polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, and ketonemia; adults may develop more gradual symptoms that initially appear similar to those of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults and maturity-onset diabetes of the young are conditions that may be confused with T1D, although they are actually more closely related to T2D...
May 2017: FP Essentials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530379/diabetes-update-foreword
#20
Kate Rowland
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: FP Essentials
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