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Global Change Biology

Fitsum Abadi, Christophe Barbraud, Olivier Gimenez
Early-life demographic traits are poorly known, impeding our understanding of population processes and sensitivity to climate change. Survival of immature individuals is a critical component of population dynamics and recruitment in particular. However, obtaining reliable estimates of juvenile survival (i.e., from independence to first year) remains challenging, as immatures are often difficult to observe and to monitor individually in the field. This is particularly acute for seabirds, in which juveniles stay at sea and remain undetectable for several years...
October 22, 2016: Global Change Biology
L Chasmer, C Hopkinson
This study demonstrates linkages between the 1997/98 El Niño/Southern Oscillation index and a threshold shift to increased permafrost loss within a southern Taiga Plains watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada. Three-dimensional contraction of permafrost plateaus and changes in vegetation structural characteristics are determined from multi-temporal airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) surveys in 2008, 2011 and 2015. Morphological changes in permafrost cover are compared with optical image analogues from 1970, 1977, 2000, and 2008 and time-series hydro-climate data...
October 22, 2016: Global Change Biology
Robert P Ellis, Mauricio A Urbina, Rod W Wilson
Exponentially rising CO2 (currently ~400 μatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. Physiologists have long known that CO2 directly affects acid-base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. More recently, many studies have demonstrated that elevated CO2 projected for end of this century (e.g. 800-1000 μatm) can also impact physiology, and have substantial effects on behaviours linked to sensory stimuli (smell, hearing and vision) both having negative implications for fitness and survival...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Vendela K Lagerholm, Edson Sandoval-Castellanos, Amélie Vaniscotte, Olga R Potapova, Teresa Tomek, Zbigniew M Bochenski, Paul Shepherd, Nick Barton, Marie-Claire Van Dyck, Rebecca Miller, Jacob Höglund, Nigel G Yoccoz, Love Dalén, John R Stewart
Global warming is predicted to cause substantial habitat rearrangements, with the most severe effects expected to occur in high-latitude biomes. However, one major uncertainty is whether species will be able to shift their ranges to keep pace with climate-driven environmental changes. Many recent studies on mammals have shown that past range contractions have been associated with local extinctions rather than survival by habitat tracking. Here, we have used an interdisciplinary approach that combines ancient DNA techniques, coalescent simulations and species distribution modelling, to investigate how two common cold-adapted bird species, willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and Lagopus muta), respond to long-term climate warming...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Jonathan W Moore, Julian D Olden
Integrating knowledge of environmental degradation, biodiversity change, and ecosystem processes across large spatial scales remains a key challenge to illuminating the resilience of Earth's systems. There is now a growing realization that the manner in which communities will respond to anthropogenic impacts will ultimately control the ecosystem consequences. Here we examine the response of freshwater fishes and their nutrient excretion - a key ecosystem process that can control aquatic productivity - to human land development across the contiguous United States...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Maxime Cailleret, Steven Jansen, Elisabeth M R Robert, Lucía Desoto, Tuomas Aakala, Joseph A Antos, Barbara Beikircher, Christof Bigler, Harald Bugmann, Marco Caccianiga, Vojtěch Čada, J Julio Camarero, Paolo Cherubini, Hervé Cochard, Marie R Coyea, Katarina Čufar, Adrian J Das, Hendrik Davi, Sylvain Delzon, Michael Dorman, Guillermo Gea-Izquierdo, Sten Gillner, Laurel J Haavik, Henrik Hartmann, Ana-Maria Hereş, Kevin R Hultine, Pavel Janda, Jeffrey M Kane, Vyacheslav I Kharuk, Thomas Kitzberger, Tamir Klein, Koen Kramer, Frederic Lens, Tom Levanic, Juan Carlos Linares Calderon, Francisco Lloret, Raquel Lobo-Do-Vale, Fabio Lombardi, Rosana López Rodríguez, Harri Mäkinen, Stefan Mayr, Ilona Mészáros, Juha M Metsaranta, Francesco Minunno, Walter Oberhuber, Andreas Papadopoulos, Mikko Peltoniemi, Any Mary Petritan, Brigitte Rohner, Gabriel Sangüesa-Barreda, Dimitrios Sarris, Jeremy M Smith, Amanda B Stan, Frank Sterck, Dejan B Stojanović, Maria Laura Suarez, Miroslav Svoboda, Roberto Tognetti, José M Torres-Ruiz, Volodymyr Trotsiuk, Ricardo Villalba, Floor Vodde, Alana R Westwood, Peter H Wyckoff, Nikolay Zafirov, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta
Tree mortality is a key factor influencing forest functions and dynamics, but our understanding of the mechanisms leading to mortality and the associated changes in tree growth rates are still limited. We compiled a new pan-continental tree-ring width database from sites where both dead and living trees were sampled (2,970 dead and 4,224 living trees from 190 sites, including 36 species), and compared early and recent growth rates between trees that died and those that survived a given mortality event. We observed a decrease in radial growth before death in ca...
October 19, 2016: Global Change Biology
Christine H Stortini, Denis Chabot, Nancy L Shackell
We have learned much about the impacts of warming on the productivity and distribution of marine organisms, but less about the impact of warming combined with other environmental stressors, including oxygen depletion. Also, the combined impact of multiple environmental stressors requires evaluation at the scales most relevant to resource managers. We use the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, characterized by a large permanently hypoxic zone, as a case study. Species Distribution Models were used to predict the impact of multiple scenarios of warming and oxygen depletion on the local density of three commercially and ecologically important species...
October 18, 2016: Global Change Biology
Jun Liu, Bo Peng, Zongwei Xia, Jianfei Sun, Decai Gao, Weiwei Dai, Ping Jiang, Edith Bai
Increasing atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition due to human activities could change N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the differences between the fates of deposited NH4(+) and NO3(-) are still not fully understood. Here we investigated the fates of deposited NH4(+) and NO3(-) respectively via the application of (15) NH4 NO3 and NH4(15) NO3 in a temperate forest ecosystem. Results showed that at 410 days after tracer application, most (15) NH4(+) was immobilized in litter layer (50 ± 2%), while a considerable amount of (15) NO3(-) penetrated into 0-5 cm mineral soil (42 ± 2%), indicating that litter layer and 0-5 cm mineral soil were the major N sinks of NH4(+) and NO3(-) , respectively...
October 18, 2016: Global Change Biology
Bryce A Richardson, Lindsay Chaney, Nancy L Shaw, Shannon M Still
Rising temperatures have begun to shift flowering time, but it is unclear whether phenotypic plasticity can accommodate projected temperature change for this century. Evaluating clines in phenological traits and the extent and variation in plasticity can provide key information on assessing risk of maladaptation and developing strategies to mitigate climate change. In this study, flower phenology was examined in 52 populations of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) growing in three common gardens. Flowering date (anthesis) varied 91 days from late July to late November among gardens...
October 14, 2016: Global Change Biology
Andrew L Skowno, Mark W Thompson, Jens Hiestermann, Brad Ripley, Adam G West, William J Bond
Increases in woody plant cover in savanna-grassland environments have been reported on globally for over 50 years and are generally perceived as a threat to rangeland productivity and biodiversity. Despite this few attempts have been made to estimate the extent of woodland increase at a national scale, principally due to technical constraints such as availability of appropriate remote sensing products. In this study we aim to measure the extent to which woodlands have replaced grasslands in South Africa's grassy biomes...
October 12, 2016: Global Change Biology
Joshua S Caplan, Daniel Giménez, Vandana Subroy, Richard J Heck, Stephen A Prior, G Brett Runion, H Allen Torbert
Soil pore structure has a strong influence on water retention, and is itself influenced by plant and microbial dynamics such as root proliferation and microbial exudation. Although increased nitrogen (N) availability and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) often have interacting effects on root and microbial dynamics, it is unclear whether these biotic effects can translate into altered soil pore structure and water retention. This study was based on a long-term experiment (7 yr at the time of sampling) in which a C4 pasture grass (Paspalum notatum) was grown on a sandy loam soil while provided factorial additions of N and CO2 ...
October 11, 2016: Global Change Biology
Mohamed Yakub, Peter Tiffin
Urban environments are warmer, have higher levels of atmospheric CO2 , and altered patterns of disturbance and precipitation than nearby rural areas. These differences can be important for plant growth and are likely to create distinct selective environments. We planted a common garden experiment with seeds collected from natural populations of the native annual plant Lepidium virginicum, growing in five urban and nearby rural areas in the northern United States to determine whether and how urban populations differ from those from surrounding rural areas...
October 8, 2016: Global Change Biology
Flemming T Dahlke, Elettra Leo, Felix C Mark, Hans-Otto Pörtner, Ulf Bickmeyer, Stephan Frickenhaus, Daniela Storch
Thermal tolerance windows serve as a powerful tool for estimating the vulnerability of marine species and their life-stages to increasing temperature means and extremes. However, it remains uncertain to which extent additional drivers, such as ocean acidification, modify organismal responses to temperature. This study investigated the effects of CO2 -driven ocean acidification on embryonic thermal sensitivity and performance in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, from the Kattegat. Fertilized eggs were exposed to factorial combinations of two PCO2 conditions (400 μatm vs...
October 8, 2016: Global Change Biology
Dominik Thom, Werner Rammer, Rupert Seidl
The rates of anthropogenic climate change substantially exceed those at which forest ecosystems - dominated by immobile, long-lived organisms - are able to adapt. The resulting maladaptation of forests has potentially detrimental effects on ecosystem functioning. Furthermore, as many forest-dwelling species are highly dependent on the prevailing tree species, a delayed response of the latter to a changing climate can contribute to an extinction debt and mask climate-induced biodiversity loss. However, climate change will likely also intensify forest disturbances...
October 6, 2016: Global Change Biology
M Helbig, L Chasmer, N Kljun, W L Quinton, C C Treat, O Sonnentag
At the southern margin of permafrost in North America, climate change causes widespread permafrost thaw. Here, thawing permafrost in forested peat plateaus ("forest") leads to expansion of permafrost-free wetlands ("wetland") in boreal lowlands. Expanding wetland area with saturated and warmer organic soils is expected to increase landscape methane (CH4 ) emissions. Here, we quantify the thaw-induced increase in CH4 emissions for a boreal forest-wetland landscape in the southern Taiga Plains, Canada, and evaluate its impact on net radiative forcing relative to potential long-term net carbon dioxide (CO2 ) exchange...
September 30, 2016: Global Change Biology
Andrea Santangeli, Ari Rajasärkkä, Aleksi Lehikoinen
Anthropogenic climate change is rapidly becoming one of the main threats to biodiversity, along with other threats triggered by human-driven land-use change. Species are already responding to climate change by shifting their distributions polewards. This shift may create a spatial mismatch between dynamic species distributions and static protected areas (PAs). As protected areas represent one of the main pillars for preserving biodiversity today and in the future, it is important to assess their contribution in sheltering the biodiversity communities, they were designated to protect...
September 29, 2016: Global Change Biology
Christopher R Field, Trina Bayard, Carina Gjerdrum, Jason M Hill, Susan Meiman, Chris S Elphick
Sea-level rise will affect coastal species worldwide, but models that aim to predict these effects are typically based on simple measures of sea level that do not capture its inherent complexity, especially variation over timescales shorter than one year. Coastal species might be most affected, however, by floods that exceed a critical threshold. The frequency and duration of such floods may be more important to population dynamics than mean measures of sea level. In particular, the potential for changes in the frequency and duration of flooding events to result in non-linear population responses or biological thresholds merits further research, but may require that models incorporate greater resolution in sea level than is typically used...
September 29, 2016: Global Change Biology
Lahiru S Wijedasa, Jyrki Jauhiainen, Mari Könönen, Maija Lampela, Harri Vasander, Marie-Claire LeBlanc, Stephanie Evers, Thomas E L Smith, Catherine M Yule, Helena Varkkey, Massimo Lupascu, Faizal Parish, Ian Singleton, Gopalasamy R Clements, Sheema Abdul Aziz, Mark E Harrison, Susan Cheyne, Gusti Z Anshari, Erik Meijaard, Jenny E Goldstein, Susan Waldron, Kristell Hergoualc'h, René Dommain, Steve Frolking, Christopher D Evans, Mary Rose C Posa, Paul H Glaser, Nyoman Suryadiputra, Reza Lubis, Truly Santika, Rory Padfield, Sofyan Kurnianto, Panut Hadisiswoyo, Teck Wyn Lim, Susan E Page, Vincent Gauci, Peter J van der Meer, Helen Buckland, Fabien Garnier, Marshall K Samuel, Liza Nuriati Lim Kim Choo, Patrick O'Reilly, Matthew Warren, Surin Suksuwan, Elham Sumarga, Anuj Jain, William F Laurance, John Couwenberg, Hans Joosten, Ronald Vernimmen, Aljosja Hooijer, Chris Malins, Mark A Cochrane, Balu Perumal, Florian Siegert, Kelvin S-H Peh, Louis-Pierre Comeau, Louis Verchot, Charles F Harvey, Alex Cobb, Zeehan Jaafar, Henk Wösten, Solichin Manuri, Moritz Müller, Wim Giesen, Jacob Phelps, Ding Li Yong, Marcel Silvius, Béatrice M M Wedeux, Alison Hoyt, Mitsuru Osaki, Hirano Takashi, Hidenori Takahashi, Takashi S Kohyama, Akira Haraguchi, Nunung P Nugroho, David A Coomes, Le Phat Quoi, Alue Dohong, Haris Gunawan, David L A Gaveau, Andreas Langner, Felix K S Lim, David P Edwards, Xingli Giam, Guido van der Werf, Rachel Carmenta, Caspar C Verwer, Luke Gibson, Laure Grandois, Laura Linda Bozena Graham, Jhanson Regalino, Serge A Wich, Jack Rieley, Nicholas Kettridge, Chloe Brown, Romain Pirard, Sam Moore, B Ripoll Capilla, Uwe Ballhorn, Hua Chew Ho, Agata Hoscilo, Sandra Lohberger, Theodore A Evans, Nina Yulianti, Grace Blackham, Onrizal, Simon Husson, Daniel Murdiyarso, Sunita Pangala, Lydia E S Cole, Luca Tacconi, Hendrik Segah, Prayoto Tonoto, Janice S H Lee, Gerald Schmilewski, Stephan Wulffraat, Erianto Indra Putra, Megan E Cattau, R S Clymo, Ross Morrison, Aazani Mujahid, Jukka Miettinen, Soo Chin Liew, Samu Valpola, David Wilson, Laura D'Arcy, Michiel Gerding, Siti Sundari, Sara A Thornton, Barbara Kalisz, Stephen J Chapman, Ahmad Suhaizi Mat Su, Imam Basuki, Masayuki Itoh, Carl Traeholt, Sean Sloan, Alexander K Sayok, Roxane Andersen
The first International Peat Congress (IPC) held in the tropics - in Kuching (Malaysia) - brought together over 1000 international peatland scientists and industrial partners from across the world ("International Peat Congress with over 1000 participants!," 2016). The congress covered all aspects of peatland ecosystems and their management, with a strong focus on the environmental, societal and economic challenges associated with contemporary large-scale agricultural conversion of tropical peat. This article is protected by copyright...
September 27, 2016: Global Change Biology
Marcin Zadworny, M Luke McCormack, Roma Żytkowiak, Piotr Karolewski, Joanna Mucha, Jacek Oleksyn
Plant functional traits may be altered as plants adapt to various environmental constraints. Cold, low fertility growing conditions are often associated with root adjustments to increase acquisition of limiting nutrient resources, but they may also result in construction of roots with reduced uptake potential but higher tissue persistence. It is ultimately unclear whether plants produce fine roots of different structure in response to decreasing temperatures and whether these changes represent a trade-off between root function or potential root persistence...
September 27, 2016: Global Change Biology
Peter M Kopittke, Ram C Dalal, Damien Finn, Neal W Menzies
Quantifying changes in stocks of C, N, P, and S in agricultural soils is important not only for managing these soils sustainably as required to feed a growing human population, but for C and N, they are also important for understanding fluxes of greenhouse gases from the soil environment. In a global meta-analysis, 102 studies were examined to investigate changes in soil stocks of organic C, total N, total P, and total S associated with long-term land-use changes. Conversion of native vegetation to cropping resulted in substantial losses of C (-1...
September 27, 2016: Global Change Biology
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