journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Global Change Biology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100041/contrasting-growth-forecasts-across-the-geographical-range-of-scots-pine-due-to-altitudinal-and-latitudinal-differences-in-climatic-sensitivity
#1
Luis Matías, Juan C Linares, Ángela Sánchez-Miranda, Alistair S Jump
Ongoing changes in global climate are altering ecological conditions for many species. The consequences of such changes are typically most evident at the edge of a species' geographical distribution, where differences in growth or population dynamics may result in range expansions or contractions. Understanding population responses to different climatic drivers along wide latitudinal and altitudinal gradients is necessary in order to gain a better understanding of plant responses to ongoing increases in global temperature and drought severity...
January 18, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100027/moving-beyond-presence-and-absence-when-examining-changes-in-species-distributions
#2
Michael B Ashcroft, Diana H King, Ben Raymond, Johanna D Turnbull, Jane Wasley, Sharon A Robinson
Species distributions are often simplified to binary representations of the ranges where they are present and absent. It is then common to look for changes in these ranges as indicators of the effects of climate change, the expansion or control of invasive species or the impact of human land use changes. We argue that there are inherent problems with this approach, and more emphasis should be placed on species relative abundance rather than just presence. The sampling effort required to be confident of absence is often impractical to achieve, and estimates of species range changes based on survey data are therefore inherently sensitive to sampling intensity...
January 18, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28084043/emergent-climate-and-co2-sensitivities-of-net-primary-productivity-in-ecosystem-models-do-not-agree-with-empirical-data-in-temperate-forests-of-eastern-north-america
#3
Christine R Rollinson, Yao Liu, Ann Raiho, David J P Moore, Jason McLachlan, Daniel A Bishop, Alex Dye, Jaclyn Hatala Matthes, Amy Hessl, Thomas Hickler, Neil Pederson, Benjamin Poulter, Tristan Quaife, Kevin Schaefer, Jörg Steinkamp, Michael C Dietze
Ecosystem models show divergent responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle to global change over the next century. Individual model evaluation and multi-model comparisons with data have largely focused on individual processes at sub-annual to decadal scales. Thus far, data-based evaluations of emergent ecosystem responses to climate and CO2 at multi-decadal and centennial time scales have been rare. We compared the sensitivity of net primary productivity (NPP) to temperature, precipitation, and CO2 in ten ecosystem models with the sensitivities found in tree-ring reconstructions of NPP and raw ring-width series at six temperate forest sites...
January 13, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078785/risks-of-ocean-acidification-in-the-california-current-food-web-and-fisheries-ecosystem-model-projections
#4
Kristin N Marshall, Isaac C Kaplan, Emma E Hodgson, Albert Hermann, D Shallin Busch, Paul McElhany, Timothy E Essington, Chris J Harvey, Elizabeth A Fulton
The benefits and ecosystem services that humans derive from the oceans are threatened by numerous global change stressors, one of which is ocean acidification. Here, we describe the effects of ocean acidification on an upwelling system that already experiences inherently low pH conditions, the California Current. We used an end-to-end ecosystem model (Atlantis), forced by downscaled global climate models and informed by a meta-analysis of the pH sensitivities of local taxa, to investigate the direct and indirect effects of future pH on biomass and fisheries revenues...
January 12, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079308/greater-temperature-sensitivity-of-plant-phenology-at-colder-sites-implications-for-convergence-across-northern-latitudes
#5
Janet Prevéy, Mark Vellend, Nadja Rüger, Robert D Hollister, Anne D Bjorkman, Isla H Myers-Smith, Sarah C Elmendorf, Karin Clark, Elisabeth J Cooper, Bo Elberling, Anna Maria Fosaa, Gregory H R Henry, Toke T Høye, Ingibjörg Svala Jónsdóttir, Kari Klanderud, Esther Lévesque, Marguerite Mauritz, Ulf Molau, Susan M Natali, Steven F Oberbauer, Zoe A Panchen, Eric Post, Sabine B Rumpf, Niels M Schmidt, Ted Schuur, Phillip R Semenchuk, Tiffany Troxler, Jeffrey M Welker, Christian Rixen
Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher-latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance at colder sites. To test this hypothesis, we examined up to 20 years of phenology data for 47 tundra plant species at 18 high-latitude sites along a climatic gradient. Across all species, the timing of leaf emergence and flowering were more sensitive to a given increase in summer temperature at colder than warmer high-latitude locations...
January 11, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28075523/extreme-rainfall-and-snowfall-alter-responses-of-soil-respiration-to-nitrogen-fertilization-a-3-year-field-experiment
#6
Zengming Chen, Yehong Xu, Xuhui Zhou, Jianwu Tang, Yakov Kuzyakov, Hongyan Yu, Jianling Fan, Weixin Ding
Extreme precipitation is predicted to be more frequent and intense accompanying global warming, and may have profound impacts on soil respiration (Rs) and its components, i.e., autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic (Rh) respiration. However, how natural extreme rainfall or snowfall events affect these fluxes are still lacking, especially under nitrogen (N) fertilization. In this study, extreme rainfall and snowfall events occurred during a 3-year field experiment, allowing us to examine their effects on the response of Rs, Rh and Ra to N supply...
January 11, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28075520/long-term-enhanced-winter-soil-frost-alters-growing-season-co2-fluxes-through-its-impact-on-vegetation-development-in-a-boreal-peatland
#7
Junbin Zhao, Matthias Peichl, Mats B Nilsson
At high latitudes, winter climate change alters snow cover and, consequently, may cause a sustained change in soil frost dynamics. Altered winter soil conditions could influence the ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and, in turn, provide feedbacks to ongoing climate change. To investigate the mechanisms that modify the peatland CO2 exchange in response to altered winter soil frost, we conducted a snow exclusion experiment to enhance winter soil frost and to evaluate its short-term (1-3 years) and long-term (11 years) effect on CO2 fluxes during subsequent growing seasons in a boreal peatland...
January 11, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073167/large-extents-of-intensive-land-use-limit-community-reorganization-during-climate-warming
#8
Tom H Oliver, Simon Gillings, James W Pearce-Higgins, Tom Brereton, Humphrey Q P Crick, Simon J Duffield, Michael D Morecroft, David B Roy
Climate change is increasingly altering the composition of ecological communities, in combination with other environmental pressures such as high-intensity land use. Pressures are expected to interact in their effects, but the extent to which intensive human land use constrains community responses to climate change is currently unclear. A generic indicator of climate change impact, the community temperature index (CTI), has previously been used to suggest that both bird and butterflies are successfully 'tracking' climate change...
January 10, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28070978/testing-for-local-adaptation-and-evolutionary-potential-along-altitudinal-gradients-in-rainforest-drosophila-beyond-laboratory-estimates
#9
Eleanor K O'Brien, Megan Higgie, Alan Reynolds, Ary A Hoffmann, Jon R Bridle
Predicting how species will respond to the rapid climatic changes predicted this century is an urgent task. Species distribution models (SDMs) use the current relationship between environmental variation and species' abundances to predict the effect of future environmental change on their distributions. However, two common assumptions of SDMs are likely to be violated in many cases: (i) that the relationship of environment with abundance or fitness is constant throughout a species' range and will remain so in future and (ii) that abiotic factors (e...
January 10, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28067005/phosphorus-in-agricultural-soils-drivers-of-its-distribution-at-the-global-scale
#10
Bruno Ringeval, Laurent Augusto, Hervé Monod, Dirk van Apeldoorn, Lex Bouwman, Xiaojuan Yang, David L Achat, Louise P Chini, Kristof Van Oost, Bertrand Guenet, Rong Wang, Bertrand Decharme, Thomas Nesme, Sylvain Pellerin
Phosphorus (P) availability in soils limits crop yields in many regions of the world, while excess of soil P triggers aquatic eutrophication in other regions. Numerous processes drive the global spatial distribution of P in agricultural soils, but their relative roles remain unclear. Here, we combined several global datasets describing these drivers with a soil P dynamics model to simulate the distribution of P in agricultural soils and to assess the contributions of the different drivers at the global scale...
January 9, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063186/the-combined-and-separate-impacts-of-climate-extremes-on-the-current-and-future-us-rainfed-maize-and-soybean-production-under-elevated-co2
#11
Zhenong Jin, Qianlai Zhuang, Jiali Wang, Sotirios V Archontoulis, Zachary Zobel, Veerabhadra R Kotamarthi
Heat and drought are two emerging climatic threats to the US maize and soybean production, yet their impacts on yields are collectively determined by the magnitude of climate change and rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This study quantifies the combined and separate impacts of high temperature, heat and drought stresses on the current and future US rainfed maize and soybean production, and for the first time characterizes spatial shifts in the relative importance of individual stress. Crop yields are simulated using the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM), driven by high-resolution (12 km) dynamically downscaled climate projections for 1995-2004 and 2085-2094...
January 7, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063181/climatic-warming-strengthens-a-positive-feedback-between-alpine-shrubs-and-fire
#12
James S Camac, Richard J Williams, Carl-Henrik Wahren, Ary A Hoffmann, Peter A Vesk
Climate change is expected to increase fire activity and woody plant encroachment in arctic and alpine landscapes. However, the extent to which these increases interact to affect the structure, function and composition of alpine ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we use field surveys and experimental manipulations to examine how warming and fire affect recruitment, seedling growth and seedling survival in four dominant Australian alpine shrubs. We found that fire increased establishment of shrub seedlings by as much as 33-fold...
January 7, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063178/landscape-genetics-indicate-recently-increased-habitat-fragmentation-in-african-forest-associated-chafers
#13
Jonas Eberle, Dennis Rödder, Marc Beckett, Dirk Ahrens
Today, indigenous forests cover less than 0.6% of South Africa's land surface and are highly fragmented. Most forest relicts are very small and typically occur in fire-protected gorges along the eastern Great Escarpment. Yet, they hold a unique and valuable fauna with high endemism and ancient phylogenetic lineages, fostered by long term climatic stability and complex micro-climates. Despite numerous studies on southern African vegetation cover, the current state of knowledge about the natural extension of indigenous forests is rather fragmentary...
January 7, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055134/moving-forward-socio-economically-focused-models-of-deforestation
#14
Camille Dezécache, Jean-Michel Salles, Ghislain Vieilledent, Bruno Hérault
While high resolution spatial variables contribute to a good fit of spatially-explicit deforestation models, socio-economic processes are often beyond the scope of these models. Such a low level of interest in the socio-economic dimension of deforestation limits the relevancy of these models for decision making and may be the cause of their failure to accurately predict observed deforestation trends in the medium term. This study aims to propose a flexible methodology for taking into account multiple drivers of deforestation in tropical forested areas, where the intensity of deforestation is explicitly predicted based on socio-economic variables...
January 5, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055128/a-decade-of-boreal-rich-fen-greenhouse-gas-fluxes-in-response-to-natural-and-experimental-water-table-variability
#15
David Olefeldt, Eugénie S Euskirchen, Jennifer Harden, Evan Kane, A David McGuire, Mark P Waldrop, Merritt R Turetsky
Rich fens are common boreal ecosystems with distinct hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology that influence their carbon (C) balance. We present growing season soil chamber methane emission (FCH4 ), ecosystem respiration (ER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and gross primary production (GPP) fluxes from a nine year water table manipulation experiment in an Alaskan rich fen. The study included major flood and drought years, where wetting and drying treatments further modified the severity of droughts. Results support previous findings from peatlands that drought causes reduced magnitude of growing season FCH4 , GPP, and NEE, thus reducing or reversing their C sink function...
January 5, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055125/effects-of-amphibian-phylogeny-climate-and-human-impact-on-the-occurrence-of-the-amphibian-killing-chytrid-fungus
#16
Leonardo D Bacigalupe, Claudio Soto-Azat, Cristobal García-Vera, Ismael Barría-Oyarzo, Enrico L Rezende
Chytridiomycosis, due to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been associated with the alarming decline and extinction crisis of amphibians worldwide. Because conservation programs are implemented locally, it is essential to understand how the complex interactions among host species, climate and human activities contribute to Bd occurrence at regional scales. Using weighted phylogenetic regressions and model selection, we investigated geographic patterns of Bd occurrence along a latitudinal gradient of 1,500 km within a biodiversity hotspot in Chile (1,845 individuals sampled from 253 sites and representing 24 species), and its association with climatic, socio-demographic and economic variables...
January 5, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055123/regional-variation-in-the-temperature-sensitivity-of-soil-organic-matter-decomposition-in-china-s-forests-and-grasslands
#17
Yuan Liu, Nianpeng He, Jianxing Zhu, Li Xu, Guirui Yu, Shuli Niu, Xiaomin Sun, Xuefa Wen
How to assess the temperature sensitivity (Q10 ) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and its regional variation with high accuracy is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the intensity and direction of the global carbon (C) cycle in response to climate change. In this study, we collected a series of soils from 22 forest sites and 30 grassland sites across China to explore regional variation in Q10 and its underlying mechanisms. We conducted a novel incubation experiment with periodically changing temperature (5-30 °C), while continuously measuring soil microbial respiration rates...
January 5, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045226/regional-climate-on-the-breeding-grounds-predicts-variation-in-the-natal-origin-of-monarch-butterflies-overwintering-in-mexico-over-38%C3%A2-years
#18
D T Tyler Flockhart, Lincoln P Brower, M Isabel Ramirez, Keith A Hobson, Leonard I Wassenaar, Sonia Altizer, D Ryan Norris
Addressing population declines of migratory insects requires linking populations across different portions of the annual cycle and understanding the effects of variation in weather and climate on productivity, recruitment, and patterns of long-distance movement. We used stable H and C isotopes and geospatial modeling to estimate the natal origin of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America using over 1000 monarchs collected over almost four decades at Mexican overwintering colonies. Multinomial regression was used to ascertain which climate-related factors best-predicted temporal variation in natal origin across six breeding regions...
January 3, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039909/global-synthesis-of-the-temperature-sensitivity-of-leaf-litter-breakdown-in-streams-and-rivers
#19
J J Follstad Shah, J S Kominoski, M Ardón, W K Dodds, M O Gessner, N A Griffiths, C P Hawkins, S L Johnson, A Lecerf, C J LeRoy, D W P Manning, A D Rosemond, R L Sinsabaugh, C M Swan, J R Webster, L H Zeglin
Streams and rivers are important conduits of terrestrially derived carbon (C) to atmospheric and marine reservoirs. Leaf litter breakdown rates are expected to increase as water temperatures rise in response to climate change. The magnitude of increase in breakdown rates is uncertain, given differences in litter quality and microbial and detritivore community responses to temperature, factors that can influence the apparent temperature sensitivity of breakdown and the relative proportion of C lost to the atmosphere vs...
December 31, 2016: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28001336/decadal-shifts-in-autumn-migration-timing-by-pacific-arctic-beluga-whales-are-related-to-delayed-annual-sea-ice-formation
#20
Donna D W Hauser, Kristin L Laidre, Kathleen M Stafford, Harry L Stern, Robert S Suydam, Pierre R Richard
Migrations are often influenced by seasonal environmental gradients that are increasingly being altered by climate change. The consequences of rapid changes in Arctic sea ice have the potential to affect migrations of a number of marine species whose timing is temporally matched to seasonal sea ice cover. This topic has not been investigated for Pacific Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) that follow matrilineally maintained autumn migrations in the waters around Alaska and Russia. For the sympatric Eastern Chukchi Sea ('Chukchi') and Eastern Beaufort Sea ('Beaufort') beluga populations, we examined changes in autumn migration timing as related to delayed regional sea ice freeze-up since the 1990s, using two independent data sources (satellite telemetry data and passive acoustics) for both populations...
December 21, 2016: Global Change Biology
journal
journal
44517
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"