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Games for Health

Daniela Villani, Claudia Carissoli, Stefano Triberti, Antonella Marchetti, Gabriella Gilli, Giuseppe Riva
INTRODUCTION: Emotion regulation (ER) supports multiple individual functions and promotes mental health and wellbeing. Among the tools that may be used to help people in managing their affective states, videogames are reaching attention and are showing positive effects. Yet, little is known about their effectiveness. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the amount and quality of studies investigating the effects and modalities of the use of videogames for ER. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search according to PRISMA guidelines was performed...
February 9, 2018: Games for Health
Christopher N Burrows, Hart Blanton
OBJECTIVE: Prior research has demonstrated that psychological immersion (or "transportation") into virtual gaming worlds can heighten influence from health-promotion messages embedded in the backgrounds of gaming scenes. However, research to date has only studied the effectiveness of embedding graphic, fear-based messages in the background of violent, first-person videogames. This study sought to examine whether transportation into a nonviolent videogame can heighten persuasion from low-fear, nongraphic health messages...
February 8, 2018: Games for Health
Deborah I Thompson, Dora Cantu, Chishinga Callender, Yan Liu, Mayur Rajendran, Madhur Rajendran, Yuting Zhang, Zhigang Deng
OBJECTIVE: Exergames played with a photorealistic avatar may enhance motivation to play, in addition to frequency, duration, and intensity of game-play. This article reports the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an exergame played with a photorealistic avatar on physical activity (PA) intensity in a laboratory-based study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Teens (12-14 years old) were recruited from a large, metropolitan area of the southwestern United States. Parents provided written informed consent...
February 6, 2018: Games for Health
Brooke M Bell, Lauren Martinez, Marientina Gotsis, H Chad Lane, Jaimie N Davis, Luz Antunez-Castillo, Gisele Ragusa, Donna Spruijt-Metz
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the Virtual Sprouts intervention, an interactive multiplatform mobile gardening game, on dietary intake and psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior in minority youth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this quasi-experimental pilot intervention, 180 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students in Los Angeles Unified School District participated in a 3-week program that included three Virtual Sprouts gaming sessions, three in-school lessons, and three in-home activities, using a nutrition- and gardening-focused curriculum...
February 2, 2018: Games for Health
Lizzy Pope, Bernice Garnett, Marguerite Dibble
OBJECTIVE: To encourage high school students to meet physical activity goals using a newly developed game, and to document the feasibility, benefits, and challenges of using an electronic gaming application to promote physical activity in high school students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Working with youth and game designers an electronic game, Camp Conquer, was developed to motivate high school students to meet physical activity goals. One-hundred-five high school students were recruited to participate in a 12-week pilot test of the game and randomly assigned to a Game Condition or Control Condition...
February 2, 2018: Games for Health
Marisa M Putnam, Elana M Richmond, Kaitlin L Brunick, Charlotte A Wright, Sandra L Calvert
OBJECTIVE: Childhood obesity is a health issue in the United States, associated with marketing practices in which media characters are often used to sell unhealthy products. This study examined exposure to a socially contingent touch-screen gaming app, which replied immediately, reliably, and accurately to children's actions. Children's recall of nutritional content and their liking of the character were assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four- and five-year-old children (N = 114) received no-exposure, single-exposure, or repeated-exposure to a character-based iPad app rewarding healthy and penalizing unhealthy behaviors...
January 24, 2018: Games for Health
Kristin L Schneider, Jocelyn Smith Carter, Cynthia Putnam, Jacey Keeney, Draycen D DeCator, Daniel Kern, Laura Aylward
OBJECTIVES: Active video games (AVGs) could provide a novel approach to increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary activity in children, but little is known about which children are likely to use AVGs. This study examined whether youth demographics, social support, and AVG engagement influence use of AVGs and physical activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A diverse sample of youth participants (42.4% non-Hispanic white), aged 8-14 years (n = 85), who owned an AVG console, completed surveys, wore an activity monitor, and logged AVG use for 1 week...
January 5, 2018: Games for Health
Marisa M Putnam, Caroline E Cotto, Sandra L Calvert
OBJECTIVE: Media characters are used to market snacks that are typically of poor nutritional value, which has been linked to childhood obesity. This study examines whether children's snack selections and consumption patterns are influenced by an app depicting a popular children's media character, as well as the role that children's awareness of the character plays. The results can increase our understanding of how to encourage healthier snack selection and consumption in newer game-based marketing venues, such as apps...
January 3, 2018: Games for Health
Adrián Borrego, Jorge Latorre, Mariano Alcañiz, Roberto Llorens
INTRODUCTION: The latest generation of head-mounted displays (HMDs) provides built-in head tracking, which enables estimating position in a room-size setting. This feature allows users to explore, navigate, and move within real-size virtual environments, such as kitchens, supermarket aisles, or streets. Previously, these actions were commonly facilitated by external peripherals and interaction metaphors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive in terms of the working range of the head tracking and the working area, accuracy, and jitter in a room-size environment, and to determine their feasibility for serious games, rehabilitation, and health-related applications...
January 2, 2018: Games for Health
Amy Shirong Lu, Hadi Kharrazi
As the field of games for health continues to gain momentum, it is crucial to document the field's scale of growth, identify design patterns, and to address potential design issues for future health game development. Few studies have explored the attributes and usability features of games for health as a whole over time. We offer the first comprehensive systematic content analysis of digital games for health by examining 1743 health games released between 1983 and 2016 in 23 countries extracted from nine international English health game databases and directories...
January 2, 2018: Games for Health
Lynne Taylor, Ngaire Kerse, Jochen Klenk, Robert Borotkanics, Ralph Maddison
OBJECTIVE: Finding suitable and engaging ways for older people living in long-term care (LTC) to engage in physical activity, to maintain function is challenging. There is a need to explore the use of exergames for LTC residents who have mobility and cognitive impairments. We investigated the effect of a group-based Xbox Kinect (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) exergame program on mobility in LTC residents with and without cognitive impairment. METHODS: Facilities were randomly assigned to the intervention (four facilities, n = 29, aged 84...
December 21, 2017: Games for Health
Ainara Garde, Manil Chowdhury, Aryannah U Rollinson, Mika Johnson, Paul Prescod, Jean Pierre Chanoine, John Mark Ansermino, Guy A Dumont
BACKGROUND: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players' steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. OBJECTIVE: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments...
February 2018: Games for Health
Courtney Ryan, Hafza Dadabhoy, Tom Baranowski
OBJECTIVE: The most productive methods of recruitment for a videogame for health (G4H) trial are not known. Success or failure of recruitment methods has been reported for a variety of clinical trials, but few specifically for G4H trials. This study's goal was to recruit 444 overweight or obese (body mass index percentile between the 84.5th-99.4th percentiles) children between the ages of 10-12 years. The article reports the results of different methods of participant recruitment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants had to agree to three fasting blood samples (baseline, immediately after, and 2 months later); be willing to wear an accelerometer for 7 days at each assessment; read and speak English fluently (because the games were in English); have no history of any condition that would affect what he/she could eat or how much physical activity he/she could get; and have an eligible home computer purchased in the last 5 years with high-speed internet...
February 2018: Games for Health
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February 2018: Games for Health
Nadia Garcia-Hernandez, Karen Garza-Martinez, Vicente Parra-Vega
BACKGROUND: Hand strength weakness affects the performance of most activities of daily living. This study aims to design, develop, and test an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training system based on serious games to promote motivation and synchronization and proper work intensity in grip exercises for improving hand strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An EMG surface sensor, soft balls with different stiffness and three exergames, conforms the system to drive videogame clues in response to EMG-inferred grip strength, while overseeing motivation...
February 2018: Games for Health
Paula M McLaughlin, Ashley F Curtis, Laura M Branscombe-Caird, Janna K Comrie, Susan J E Murtha
OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether a commercially available brain training program is feasible to use with a middle-aged population and has a potential impact on cognition and emotional well-being (proof of concept). METHOD: Fourteen participants (ages 46-55) completed two 6-week training conditions using a crossover (counterbalanced) design: (1) experimental brain training condition and (2) active control "find answers to trivia questions online" condition...
February 2018: Games for Health
Jéssica Maria Ribeiro Bacha, Gisele Cristine Vieira Gomes, Tatiana Beline de Freitas, Larissa Alamino Pereira Viveiro, Keyte Guedes da Silva, Géssika Costa Bueno, Eliana Maria Varise, Camila Torriani-Pasin, Angélica Castilho Alonso, Natalia Mariana Silva Luna, Júlia Maria D'Andrea Greve, José Eduardo Pompeu
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of Kinect Adventures games versus conventional physiotherapy to improve postural control (PC), gait, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cognition of the elderly. In addition, we evaluated the safety, acceptability, and adherence to the interventions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a randomized clinical trial in which 46 elderly individuals were selected, mean age 69.3 (5.34) years. Participants were allocated to the Kinect Adventures Training Group (KATG) or the Conventional Physical Therapy Group (CPTG), 23 individuals in each group...
December 14, 2017: Games for Health
Jinhui Li, Xuexin Xu, Tan Phat Pham, Yin-Leng Theng, Niina Katajapuu, Mika Luimula
OBJECTIVE: Exergames are increasingly been used in the primary healthcare domain for older adults who are 65 years and above. However, most of the exergames on current market are not designed for the aging population. The current study introduced five new exergames developed for elderly and evaluated their benefits. METHODS: Five new exergames were developed by researchers from Finland, Singapore, and Japan, in which the game topics, difficulties, and user interface were designed particularly for older adults...
December 2017: Games for Health
Arkalgud Govindraju Harikiran, Deepti Vadavi, Tulika Shruti
BACKGROUND: Card games are easy, cost effective, culturally acceptable, as well as sustainable and require minimal infrastructure over other edutainment approaches in achieving health and oral health promotion goals. Therefore, we wanted to conceptualize, develop, and beta test an innovative oral health edutainment card game for preadolescent children in Bangalore, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An innovative oral health card game, titled "32 warriors" was conceptualized and developed to incorporate age appropriate, medically accurate oral health information...
December 2017: Games for Health
Ricardo Borges Viana, Claudia Lima Alves, Carlos Alexandre Vieira, Rodrigo Luiz Vancini, Mario Hebling Campos, Paulo Gentil, Marília Santos Andrade, Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira
OBJECTIVE: Exergames appear to be a promising tool to increase energy expenditure and physical fitness. However, less is known about the effect of a single session of an exergame on anxiety state. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single session of the exergame Zumba® Fitness (Xbox 360 Kinect® ) on the anxiety state of healthy young women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty healthy young women (22.9 ± 3.7 years; 62.43 ± 8.75 kg; 1...
December 2017: Games for Health
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