Read by QxMD icon Read

Clinical Kidney Journal

Helbert Rondon-Berrios, James R Johnston
The interest in nephrology as a career has declined over the last several years. Some of the reasons cited for this decline include the complexity of the specialty, poor mentoring and inadequate teaching of nephrology from medical school through residency. The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to advances in the science of adult learning, illustrate best teaching practices in medical education that can be extrapolated to nephrology and introduce the basic teaching methods that can be used on the wards, in clinics and in the classroom...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Josephine Sau Fan Chow, Kim Jobburn, Margaret Chapman, Michael Suranyi
BACKGROUND: An ageing population and geographical growth, along with an increase in the number of people that reside in specific location, are increasing the demand for renal replacement therapies. Hospital-based haemodialysis units are struggling to cope with the associated physical, staffing and cost demands. Home-based dialysis therapies are known to be more cost effective with superior social, physical health and survival outcomes. METHODS: 'RENEW, a renal redesign project, examined the pre-dialysis health care experience of renal patients to find opportunities to improve patient care outcomes and increase the uptake of home-based dialysis therapies...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Renzo Mignani, Federico Pieruzzi, Francesco Berri, Alessandro Burlina, Benito Chinea, Maurizio Gallieni, Maurizio Pieroni, Alessandro Salviati, Marco Spada
Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Charlotte Van Ende, Dunja Wilmes, Frédéric E Lecouvet, Laura Labriola, René Cuvelier, Grégory Van Ingelgem, Michel Jadoul
A few single cases of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infection have been reported in haemodialysis patients. We report three additional cases that share peculiar clinical characteristics, pointing to diagnostic clues. All three cases presented as erythematous nodules developing distally to a proximal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). This presentation was identical to that of two published cases. A survey of all Belgian haemodialysis units during the period 2007-11 yields an estimated incidence of ∼0.9/10 000 patient-years...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Carlo Basile, Luigi Vernaglione, Francesco Casucci, Pasquale Libutti, Piero Lisi, Luigi Rossi, Valentina Vigo, Carlo Lomonte
BACKGROUND: Satisfactory vascular access flow (Qa) of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is necessary for haemodialysis (HD) adequacy. The aim of the present study was to further our understanding of haemodynamic modifications of the cardiovascular system of HD patients associated with an AVF. The main objective was to calculate using real data in what way an AVF influences the load of the left ventricle (LLV). METHODS: All HD patients treated in our dialysis unit and bearing an AVF were enrolled into the present observational cross-sectional study...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Chyng-Wen Fwu, Paul L Kimmel, Paul W Eggers, Kevin C Abbott
BACKGROUND: Although patients treated with maintenance hemodialysis are at an increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with the general population, national practices for colorectal cancer screening have not been reported in this population. We assessed the performance of colorectal cancer screening in the US end-stage renal disease program in comparison with the US Medicare population. METHODS: We studied the United States Renal Data System for US prevalent hemodialysis patients between 2002 and 2011 who had Medicare as their primary insurer...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Reem Daloul, Aubrey R Morrison
The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in patients with hypertension or impaired renal function remains a clinical dilemma. The current general consensus, supported by the results of the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions and Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery Lesions trials, argues strongly against endovascular intervention in favor of optimal medical management. We discuss the limitations and implications of the contemporary clinical trials and present our approach and formulate clear recommendations to help with the management of patients with atherosclerotic narrowing of the renal artery...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
John A D'Elia, George Bayliss, Ray E Gleason, Larry A Weinrauch
Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Pierre Delanaye, Toralf Melsom, Natalie Ebert, Sten-Erik Bäck, Christophe Mariat, Etienne Cavalier, Jonas Björk, Anders Christensson, Ulf Nyman, Esteban Porrini, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Piero Ruggenenti, Elke Schaeffner, Inga Soveri, Gunnar Sterner, Bjørn Odvar Eriksen, Flavio Gaspari
A reliable assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of paramount importance in clinical practice as well as epidemiological and clinical research settings. It is recommended by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines in specific populations (anorectic, cirrhotic, obese, renal and non-renal transplant patients) where estimation equations are unreliable. Measured GFR is the only valuable test to confirm or confute the status of chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate the slope of renal function decay over time, to assess the suitability of living kidney donors and for dosing of potentially toxic medication with a narrow therapeutic index...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Pierre Delanaye, Natalie Ebert, Toralf Melsom, Flavio Gaspari, Christophe Mariat, Etienne Cavalier, Jonas Björk, Anders Christensson, Ulf Nyman, Esteban Porrini, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Piero Ruggenenti, Elke Schaeffner, Inga Soveri, Gunnar Sterner, Bjørn Odvar Eriksen, Sten-Erik Bäck
While there is general agreement on the necessity to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in many clinical situations, there is less agreement on the best method to achieve this purpose. As the gold standard method for GFR determination, urinary (or renal) clearance of inulin, fades into the background due to inconvenience and high cost, a diversity of filtration markers and protocols compete to replace it. In this review, we suggest that iohexol, a non-ionic contrast agent, is most suited to replace inulin as the marker of choice for GFR determination...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Shunsuke Goto, Hideki Fujii, Keiji Kono, Kentaro Watanabe, Kentaro Nakai, Shinichi Nishi
Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is regulated by sustained phosphate supplementation and restriction. However, few studies have investigated FGF23 levels in patients with Fanconi syndrome. Therefore, we evaluated intact and C-terminal FGF23 and FGF23-associated parameters in four patients with Fanconi syndrome. Serum intact and C-terminal FGF23 levels were extremely low. Although serum phosphate and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels improved to or above the normal range within 1 year of treatment with oral phosphate and calcitriol, serum FGF23 levels remained low...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Narayan Prasad, Akhilesh Jaiswal, Vikas Agarwal, Shashi Kumar, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Subhash Yadav, Amit Gupta, Raj K Sharma, Dharmendra Bhadauria, Anupama Kaul
BACKGROUND: We aimed to longitudinally analyse changes in the levels of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and associated minerals in patients undergoing renal transplantation. METHODS: Sixty-three patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent living donor transplantation were recruited. Serum FGF23, iPTH, uric acid, inorganic phosphorous (iP), blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were measured pre-transplant and at 1 (M1), 3 (M3) and 12 months (M12) post-transplantation...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Giuseppe Cianciolo, Mario Cozzolino
During the last decade, a new view into the molecular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been proposed, with fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a novel player in the field. Enhanced serum FGF23 levels cause a reduction in serum phosphate, together with calcitriol suppression and consequent hyperparathyroidism (HPT). In contrast, reduced serum FGF23 levels are associated with hyperphosphatemia, higher calcitriol levels and parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppression. In addition, serum FGF23 levels are greatly increased and positively correlated with serum phosphate levels in CKD patients...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Bobby Gu, Alex B Magil, Sean J Barbour
Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody-positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody-negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over time. Disease severity paralleled the detection of anti-GBM antibodies but was independent of IgG subtype staining along the GBM...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Patricia Liu, Sana Waheed, Lamya Boujelbane, Laura J Maursetter
Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease is commonly a monophasic illness. We present the case of multiple recurrences of anti-GBM disease with varying serum anti-GBM antibody findings. A 33-year-old female tobacco user presenting with hematuria was diagnosed with anti-GBM disease by renal biopsy. Five years later, she presented with alveolar hemorrhage and positive anti-GBM antibody. She presented a third time with alveolar hemorrhage but undetectable anti-GBM antibody. With each occurrence, symptoms resolved with plasmapheresis, intravenous methylprednisone and oral cyclophosphamide...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Richard J Glassock
Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease usually pursues a self-limited course, at least from the immunological perspective. In addition, circulating antibodies to cryptic, conformational epitopes within the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of Type IV Collagen are commonly found at the zenith of the clinical disease. However, exceptions to these general rules do occur, as exemplified by two remarkable cases reported in this issue of the Clinical Kidney Journal. The possible explanations for and the lessons learned from these uncommon occurrences are discussed in this short commentary...
October 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Naoka Murakami, Thiago J Borges, Michifumi Yamashita, Leonardo V Riella
[This corrects the article on p. 411 in vol. 9, PMID: 27274826.].
August 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Manoj Kumar Mohapatra, Ashok Kumar Behera, Purna Chandra Karua, Prafulla Kumar Bariha, Ashutosh Rath, Kailash Chandra Aggrawal, Snigdha Rani Nahak, Santosh Shankar Gudaganatti
BACKGROUND: Severe cholestatic jaundice may complicate with bile cast nephropathy (BCN) causing severe acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigate BCN in severe falciparum malaria complicated with jaundice and AKI. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary health care institution with high prevalence of malaria. A cohort of 110 patients with falciparum malaria complicated with cerebral malaria, jaundice and AKI were enrolled. Species diagnosis was made from peripheral blood smear or rapid diagnostic test...
August 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Sajith Sebastian, Christelle Filmalter, Justin Harvey, Mogamat-Yazied Chothia
BACKGROUND: Intradialytic hypertension (IDH) increases morbidity and mortality. The prevalence in South Africa is unknown. The pathogenesis is unclear, but it has been suggested that IDH may be due to subclinical fluid overload. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of IDH and to evaluate its association with fluid overload using bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 190 chronic haemodialysis patients in the Western Cape province of South Africa was conducted between January 2013 and May 2014...
August 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Steve Siu-Man Wong, Wai-Yan Lau, Ping-Kwan Chan, Ching-Kit Wan, Yuk-Lun Cheng
BACKGROUND: Low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is commonly used as an anticoagulant for haemodialysis by a single-bolus injection. However, its application in extended haemodialysis has been infrequently studied. In particular, for nocturnal home haemodialysis patients sleeping throughout treatment, the need for additional intradialytic bolus might render the use of LMWH impractical. To overcome this limitation, we changed traditional bolus injections to continuous infusion. We first tested our method among in-centre 4-h haemodialysis patients to establish a feasible and safe infusion regimen before utilizing it in extended dialyses at home...
August 2016: Clinical Kidney Journal
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"