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I-Perception

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321290/in-your-face-startle-to-emotional-facial-expressions-depends-on-face-direction
#1
Ole Åsli, Henriette Michalsen, Morten Øvervoll
Although faces are often included in the broad category of emotional visual stimuli, the affective impact of different facial expressions is not well documented. The present experiment investigated startle electromyographic responses to pictures of neutral, happy, angry, and fearful facial expressions, with a frontal face direction (directed) and at a 45° angle to the left (averted). Results showed that emotional facial expressions interact with face direction to produce startle potentiation: Greater responses were found for angry expressions, compared with fear and neutrality, with directed faces...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321289/art-perception-in-the-museum-how-we-spend-time-and-space-in-art-exhibitions
#2
Claus-Christian Carbon
Aesthetics research aiming at understanding art experience is an emerging field; however, most research is conducted in labs without access to real artworks, without the social context of a museum and without the presence of other persons. The present article replicates and complements key findings of art perception in museum contexts. When observing museum visitors (N = 225; 126 female, M(age) = 43.3 years) while perceiving a series of six Gerhard Richter paintings of various sizes (0.26-3.20 sq...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321288/influence-of-coactors-on-saccadic-and-manual-responses
#3
Manuel Oliva, Diederick C Niehorster, Halszka Jarodzka, Kenneth Holmqvist
Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of coaction on saccadic and manual responses. Participants performed the experiments either in a solitary condition or in a group of coactors who performed the same tasks at the same time. In Experiment 1, participants completed a pro- and antisaccade task where they were required to make saccades towards (prosaccades) or away (antisaccades) from a peripheral visual stimulus. In Experiment 2, participants performed a visual discrimination task that required both making a saccade towards a peripheral stimulus and making a manual response in reaction to the stimulus's orientation...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321287/keeping-safe-intra-individual-consistency-in-obstacle-avoidance-behaviour-across-grasping-and-locomotion-tasks
#4
Karina Kangur, Jutta Billino, Constanze Hesse
Successful obstacle avoidance requires a close coordination of the visual and the motor systems. Visual information is essential for adjusting movements in order to avoid unwanted collisions. Yet, established obstacle avoidance paradigms have typically either focused on gaze strategies or on motor adjustments. Here we were interested in whether humans show similar visuomotor sensitivity to obstacles when gaze and motor behaviour are measured across different obstacle avoidance tasks. To this end, we measured participants' hand movement paths when grasping targets in the presence of obstacles as well as their gaze behaviour when walking through a cluttered hallway...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286640/threshold-differences-on-figure-and-ground-gelb-and-granit-1923
#5
Max Kinateder, Rolf Nelson
In 1923, Gelb and Granit, using a method of adjustment for a small red light, reported a lower threshold for the target when presented on a ground region than on an adjacent figural region. More recent work in perceptual organization has found precisely the opposite-a processing advantage seems to go to items presented on the figure, not the ground. Although Gelb and Granit continue to be cited for their finding, it has not previously been available as an English translation. Understanding their methodology and results is important for integrating early Gestalt theory with more recent investigations...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228928/rotating-snakes-illusion-quantitative-analysis-reveals-a-region-in-luminance-space-with-opposite-illusory-rotation
#6
Lea Atala-Gérard, Michael Bach
The Rotating Snakes Illusion employs patterns with repetitive asymmetric luminance steps forming a "snake wheel." In the underlying luminance sequence {black, dark grey, white, light grey}, coded as {0, g1, 100, g2}, we varied g1 and g2 and measured illusion strength via nulling: Saccades were performed next to a "snake wheel" that rotated physically; observers adjusted rotation until a stationary percept obtained. Observers performed the perceptual nulling of the seeming rotation reliably. Typical settings for (g1, g2), measured from images by Kitaoka, are around (20%, 60%)...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210488/systematic-distortions-in-vertical-placement-of-features-in-drawings-of-faces-and-houses
#7
Neil R Harrison, Julia Jones, Simon J Davies
A crucial part of accurately drawing portraits is the correct vertical positioning of the eyes. Non-experts typically place the eyes higher on the head than they are actually located; however, the explanation for this remains unclear. In Experiment 1, participants drew faces from memory and directly copied from a photograph, to confirm whether biases in observational drawings were related to biases in memory-based drawings. In Experiment 2, participants drew a cat's face, to test explanations by Carbon and Wirth for the positional bias: the 'view-from-below, the 'head-as-box', and the 'hair-as-hat' explanations...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210487/erratum-to-an-easy-way-to-show-memory-color-effects
#8
(no author information available yet)
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1177/2041669516663751.].
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210486/touch-accelerates-visual-awareness
#9
Claudia Lunghi, Luca Lo Verde, David Alais
To efficiently interact with the external environment, our nervous system combines information arising from different sensory modalities. Recent evidence suggests that cross-modal interactions can be automatic and even unconscious, reflecting the ecological relevance of cross-modal processing. Here, we use continuous flash suppression (CFS) to directly investigate whether haptic signals can interact with visual signals outside of visual awareness. We measured suppression durations of visual gratings rendered invisible by CFS either during visual stimulation alone or during visuo-haptic stimulation...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210485/directional-bias-in-the-perception-of-cast-shadows
#10
Tomomi Koizumi, Hiroyuki Ito, Shoji Sunaga, Masaki Ogawa
Previous studies have demonstrated that the perception of shading is based upon assumptions about lighting direction, for example, light from above. However, it is not clear whether these assumptions are used in the perception of cast shadows. Moreover, it is unclear whether a perceptual interaction exists between shading and cast shadows because until now they have been studied separately. In this study, we investigated through three experiments whether the light-from-above (or another direction) assumption is used in interpreting ambiguous cast shadows, and whether shading information influences the interpretation of cast shadows...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203355/who-is-the-usual-suspect-evidence-of-a-selection-bias-toward-faces-that-make-direct-eye-contact-in-a-lineup-task
#11
Jessica Taubert, Celine van Golde, Frans A J Verstraten
The speed and ease with which we recognize the faces of our friends and family members belies the difficulty we have recognizing less familiar individuals. Nonetheless, overconfidence in our ability to recognize faces has carried over into various aspects of our legal system; for instance, eyewitness identification serves a critical role in criminal proceedings. For this reason, understanding the perceptual and psychological processes that underlie false identification is of the utmost importance. Gaze direction is a salient social signal and direct eye contact, in particular, is thought to capture attention...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203354/the-graphesthesia-paradigm-drawing-letters-on-the-body-to-investigate-the-embodied-nature-of-perspective-taking
#12
Gabriel Arnold, Malika Auvray
In this study, we investigated whether adopting a head-centered perspective on the body is an embodied process by means of the graphesthesia task. This task consists of interpreting ambiguous tactile symbols from different spatial perspectives. The results revealed that symbols were more easily recognized when the mental rotation of the head toward the stimulated surface corresponded to physically possible, as opposed to impossible, body movements. Performance also decreased with increasing the amount of body movements that would be necessary to physically rotate the head...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203353/auditory-stimulus-detection-partially-depends-on-visuospatial-attentional-resources
#13
Basil Wahn, Supriya Murali, Scott Sinnett, Peter König
Humans' ability to detect relevant sensory information while being engaged in a demanding task is crucial in daily life. Yet, limited attentional resources restrict information processing. To date, it is still debated whether there are distinct pools of attentional resources for each sensory modality and to what extent the process of multisensory integration is dependent on attentional resources. We addressed these two questions using a dual task paradigm. Specifically, participants performed a multiple object tracking task and a detection task either separately or simultaneously...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203352/a-glossy-simultaneous-contrast-conjoint-measurements-of-gloss-and-lightness
#14
Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, Pascal Mamassian
Interactions between the albedo and the gloss on a surface are commonplace. Darker surfaces are perceived glossier (contrast gloss) than lighter surfaces and darker backgrounds can enhance perceived lightness of surfaces. We used maximum likelihood conjoint measurements to simultaneously quantify the strength of those effects. We quantified the extent to which albedo can influence perceived gloss and physical gloss can influence perceived lightness. We modeled the contribution of lightness and gloss and found that increasing lightness reduced perceived gloss by about 32% whereas gloss had a much weaker influence on perceived lightness of about 12%...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203351/pink-cricket-balls-may-be-visually-challenging-at-sunset
#15
Joshua M Adie, Derek H Arnold
Cricket is one of the world's most popular sports, followed by hundreds of millions of people. It can be dangerous, played with a hard ball flying at great velocities, and accidents have occasionally been fatal. Traditionally, cricket has been played during the day, using a dark red ball. Since the late 1970s, a shorter form of one-day cricket has been played both during the day and at night under floodlights. To overcome visibility issues, one-day cricket uses a white ball, and players wear coloured clothing...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203350/separate-and-simultaneous-adjustment-of-light-qualities-in-a-real-scene
#16
Ling Xia, Sylvia C Pont, Ingrid Heynderick
Humans are able to estimate light field properties in a scene in that they have expectations of the objects' appearance inside it. Previously, we probed such expectations in a real scene by asking whether a "probe object" fitted a real scene with regard to its lighting. But how well are observers able to interactively adjust the light properties on a "probe object" to its surrounding real scene? Image ambiguities can result in perceptual interactions between light properties. Such interactions formed a major problem for the "readability" of the illumination direction and diffuseness on a matte smooth spherical probe...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203349/depth-perception-and-the-history-of-three-dimensional-art-who-produced-the-first-stereoscopic-images
#17
Kevin R Brooks
The history of the expression of three-dimensional structure in art can be traced from the use of occlusion in Palaeolithic cave paintings, through the use of shadow in classical art, to the development of perspective during the Renaissance. However, the history of the use of stereoscopic techniques is controversial. Although the first undisputed stereoscopic images were presented by Wheatstone in 1838, it has been claimed that two sketches by Jacopo Chimenti da Empoli (c. 1600) can be to be fused to yield an impression of stereoscopic depth, while others suggest that Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa is the world's first stereogram...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096972/objects-versus-shadows-as-influences-on-perceived-object-motion
#18
Marouane Ouhnana, Frederick A A Kingdom
The motion trajectory of an object's cast shadow has been shown to alter the perceived trajectory of a casting object, an effect that holds even if the cast shadow appears unrealistic. This raises the question of whether a cast shadow per se is necessary for this influence, a question that has been studied only with stationary targets. We examined the relative influence of a shadow and a spherical object on the perceived motion trajectory of an identical spherical object, using a paradigm similar to Kersten, Mamassian, and Knill's ball-in-box animation...
November 2016: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27994845/crossmodal-modulation-of-spatial-localization-by-mimetic-words
#19
Akihiko Gobara, Yuki Yamada, Kayo Miura
The present study investigated whether aurally presented mimetic words affect the judgment of the final position of a moving object. In Experiment 1, horizontal apparent motion of a visual target was presented, and an auditory mimetic word of "byun" (representing rapid forward motion), "pitari" (representing stop of motion), or "nisahi" (nonsense syllable) was presented via headphones. Observers were asked to judge which of two test stimuli was horizontally aligned with the target. The results showed that forward displacement in the "pitari" condition was significantly smaller than in the "byun" and "nisahi" conditions...
November 2016: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27994844/circling-around-the-uncanny-valley-design-principles-for-research-into-the-relation-between-human-likeness-and-eeriness
#20
REVIEW
Stephanie Lay, Nicola Brace, Graham Pike, Frank Pollick
The uncanny valley effect (UVE) is a negative emotional response experienced when encountering entities that appear almost human. Research on the UVE typically investigates individual, or collections of, near human entities but may be prone to methodological circularity unless the properties that give rise to the emotional response are appropriately defined and quantified. In addition, many studies do not sufficiently control the variation in human likeness portrayed in stimulus images, meaning that the nature of stimuli that elicit the UVE is also not well defined or quantified...
November 2016: I-Perception
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