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Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213438/tumor-microenvironment-and-differential-responses-to-therapy
#1
Eishu Hirata, Erik Sahai
Cancer evolution plays a key role in both the development of tumors and their response to therapy. Like all evolutionary processes, tumor evolution is shaped by the environment. In tumors, this consists of a complex mixture of nontransformed cell types and extracellular matrix. Chemotherapy or radiotherapy imposes further strong selective pressures on cancer cells during cancer treatment. Here, we review how different components of the tumor microenvironment can modulate the response to chemo- and radiotherapy...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213437/%C3%AE-synuclein-multiple-system-atrophy-prions
#2
Amanda L Woerman, Joel C Watts, Atsushi Aoyagi, Kurt Giles, Lefkos T Middleton, Stanley B Prusiner
Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease arising from the misfolding and accumulation of the protein α-synuclein in oligodendrocytes, where it forms glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs). Several years of studying synthetic α-synuclein fibrils has provided critical insight into the ability of α-synuclein to template endogenous protein misfolding, giving rise to fibrillar structures capable of propagating from cell to cell. However, more recent studies with MSA-derived α-synuclein aggregates have shown that they have a similar ability to undergo template-directed propagation, like PrP prions...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213436/host-cell-tropism-and-adaptation-of-blood-stage-malaria-parasites-challenges-for-malaria-elimination
#3
Caeul Lim, Selasi Dankwa, Aditya S Paul, Manoj T Duraisingh
Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax account for most of the mortality and morbidity associated with malaria in humans. Research and control efforts have focused on infections caused by P. falciparum and P. vivax, but have neglected other malaria parasite species that infect humans. Additionally, many related malaria parasite species infect nonhuman primates (NHPs), and have the potential for transmission to humans. For malaria elimination, the varied and specific challenges of all of these Plasmodium species will need to be considered...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213435/genetics-of-synucleinopathies
#4
Robert L Nussbaum
Parkinson's disease (PD), diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), and multiple system atrophy (MSA) constitute the three major neurodegenerative disorders referred to as synucleinopathies because both genetic and pathological results implicate the α-synuclein protein in their pathogenesis. PD and DLBD are recognized as closely related diseases with substantial clinical and pathological overlap. MSA, on the other hand, has a distinctive clinical presentation and neuropathological profile. In this review, we will summarize the evidence linking α-synuclein to these three disorders...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213434/malaria-during-pregnancy
#5
Michal Fried, Patrick E Duffy
One hundred and twenty-five million women in malaria-endemic areas become pregnant each year (see Dellicour et al. PLoS Med7: e1000221 [2010]) and require protection from infection to avoid disease and death for themselves and their offspring. Chloroquine prophylaxis was once a safe approach to prevention but has been abandoned because of drug-resistant parasites, and intermittent presumptive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, which is currently used to protect pregnant women throughout Africa, is rapidly losing its benefits for the same reason...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213433/chromosomal-instability-as-a-driver-of-tumor-heterogeneity-and-evolution
#6
Samuel F Bakhoum, Dan Avi Landau
Large-scale, massively parallel sequencing of human cancer samples has revealed tremendous genetic heterogeneity within individual tumors. Indeed, tumors are composed of an admixture of diverse subpopulations-subclones-that vary in space and time. Here, we discuss a principal driver of clonal diversification in cancer known as chromosomal instability (CIN), which complements other modes of genetic diversification creating the multilayered genomic instability often seen in human cancer. Cancer cells have evolved to fine-tune chromosome missegregation rates to balance the acquisition of heterogeneity while preserving favorable genotypes, a dependence that can be exploited for a therapeutic benefit...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213432/targeting-cancer-cells-with-bet-bromodomain-inhibitors
#7
Yali Xu, Christopher R Vakoc
Cancer cells are often hypersensitive to the targeting of transcriptional regulators, which may reflect the deregulated gene expression programs that underlie malignant transformation. One of the most prominent transcriptional vulnerabilities in human cancer to emerge in recent years is the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of proteins, which are coactivators that link acetylated transcription factors and histones to the activation of RNA polymerase II. Despite unclear mechanisms underlying the gene specificity of BET protein function, small molecules targeting these regulators preferentially suppress the transcription of cancer-promoting genes...
February 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193770/%C3%AE-amyloid-prions-and-the-pathobiology-of-alzheimer-s-disease
#8
Joel C Watts, Stanley B Prusiner
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in humans and will pose a considerable challenge to healthcare systems in the coming years. Aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide within the brain is thought to be an initiating event in AD pathogenesis. Many recent studies in transgenic mice have provided evidence that Aβ aggregates become self-propagating during disease, leading to a cascade of protein aggregation in the brain, which may underlie the progressive nature of AD. The ability to self-propagate and the existence of distinct "strains" reveals that Aβ aggregates exhibit many properties indistinguishable from those of prions composed of PrP(Sc) proteins...
February 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193769/long-noncoding-rnas-at-the-intersection-of-cancer-and-chromatin-biology
#9
Adam M Schmitt, Howard Y Chang
Although only 2% of the genome encodes protein, RNA is transcribed from the majority of the genetic sequence, suggesting a massive degree of cellular functionality is programmed in the noncoding genome. The mammalian genome contains tens of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which occur at disease-associated loci or are specifically expressed in cancer. Although the vast majority of lncRNAs have no known function, recurring molecular mechanisms for lncRNAs are now being observed in chromatin regulation and cancer pathways and emerging technologies are now providing tools to interrogate lncRNA molecular interactions and determine function of these abundant cellular macromolecules...
February 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193768/exploiting-the-p53-pathway-for-therapy
#10
Chit Fang Cheok, David Philip Lane
The excitement around the entry into the clinic of the first generation of p53-specific drugs has become muted as the hoped-for dramatic clinical responses have not yet been seen. However, these pioneer molecules have become exceptionally powerful tools in the analysis of the p53 pathway and, as a result, a whole spectrum of new interventions are being explored. These include entirely novel and innovative approaches to drug discovery, such as the use of exon-skipping antisense oligonucleotides and T-cell-receptor-based molecules...
February 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193767/the-role-of-nuclear-receptor-binding-set-domain-family-histone-lysine-methyltransferases-in-cancer
#11
Richard L Bennett, Alok Swaroop, Catalina Troche, Jonathan D Licht
The nuclear receptor-binding SET Domain (NSD) family of histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases is comprised of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1). These enzymes recognize and catalyze methylation of histone lysine marks to regulate chromatin integrity and gene expression. The growing number of reports demonstrating that alterations or translocations of these genes fundamentally affect cell growth and differentiation leading to developmental defects illustrates the importance of this family. In addition, overexpression, gain of function somatic mutations, and translocations of NSDs are associated with human cancer and can trigger cellular transformation in model systems...
February 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193766/molecular-mechanisms-of-chronic-wasting-disease-prion-propagation
#12
Julie A Moreno, Glenn C Telling
Prion disease epidemics, which have been unpredictable recurrences, are of significant concern for animal and human health. Examples include kuru, once the leading cause of death among the Fore people in Papua New Guinea and caused by mortuary feasting; bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and its subsequent transmission to humans in the form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), and repeated examples of large-scale prion disease epidemics in animals caused by contaminated vaccines. The etiology of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a relatively new and burgeoning prion epidemic in deer, elk, and moose (members of the cervid family), is more enigmatic...
February 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159833/setting-the-stage-for-cancer-development-setd2-and-the-consequences-of-lost-methylation
#13
Catherine C Fahey, Ian J Davis
The H3 lysine 36 histone methyltransferase SETD2 is mutated across a range of human cancers. Although other enzymes can mediate mono- and dimethylation, SETD2 is the exclusive trimethylase. SETD2 associates with the phosphorylated carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase and modifies histones at actively transcribed genes. The functions associated with SETD2 are mediated through multiple effector proteins that bind trimethylated H3K36. These effectors directly mediate multiple chromatin-regulated processes, including RNA splicing, DNA damage repair, and DNA methylation...
February 3, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159832/dna-hypomethylating-drugs-in-cancer-therapy
#14
Takahiro Sato, Jean-Pierre J Issa, Patricia Kropf
Aberrant DNA methylation is a critically important modification in cancer cells, which, through promoter and enhancer DNA methylation changes, use this mechanism to activate oncogenes and silence of tumor-suppressor genes. Targeting DNA methylation in cancer using DNA hypomethylating drugs reprograms tumor cells to a more normal-like state by affecting multiple pathways, and also sensitizes these cells to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The first generation hypomethylating drugs azacitidine and decitabine are routinely used for the treatment of myeloid leukemias and a next-generation drug (guadecitabine) is currently in clinical trials...
February 3, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159831/prion-like-protein-aggregates-and-type-2-diabetes
#15
Abhisek Mukherjee, Claudio Soto
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent metabolic disease characterized by chronic insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction and loss, leading to impaired insulin release and hyperglycemia. Although the mechanism responsible for β-cell dysfunction and death is not completely understood, recent findings suggest that the accumulation of misfolded aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in the islets of Langerhans may play an important role in pancreatic damage. Misfolding and aggregation of diverse proteins and their accumulation as amyloid in different organs is the hallmark feature in a group of chronic, degenerative diseases termed protein misfolding disorders (PMDs)...
February 3, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159830/therapeutic-strategies-for-restoring-tau-homeostasis
#16
Zapporah T Young, Sue Ann Mok, Jason E Gestwicki
Normal tau homeostasis is achieved when the synthesis, processing, and degradation of the protein is balanced. Together, the pathways that regulate tau homeostasis ensure that the protein is at the proper levels and that its posttranslational modifications and subcellular localization are appropriately controlled. These pathways include the enzymes responsible for posttranslational modifications, those systems that regulate mRNA splicing, and the molecular chaperones that control tau turnover and its binding to microtubules...
February 3, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28130314/disease-mechanisms-of-c9orf72-repeat-expansions
#17
Tania F Gendron, Leonard Petrucelli
G4C2 repeat expansions within the C9ORF72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). These bidirectionally transcribed expansions lead to (1) the accumulation of sense G4C2 and antisense G2C4 repeat-containing RNA, (2) the production of proteins of repeating dipeptides through unconventional translation of these transcripts, and (3) decreased C9ORF72 mRNA and protein expression. Consequently, there is ample opportunity for the C9ORF72 mutation to give rise to a spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from muscle weakness and atrophy to changes in behavior and cognition...
January 27, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28130313/the-genetics-of-c9orf72-expansions
#18
Ilse Gijselinck, Marc Cruts, Christine Van Broeckhoven
Repeat expansions in the promoter region of C9orf72 are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related disorders of the ALS/frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum. Remarkable clinical heterogeneity among patients with a repeat expansion has been observed, and genetic anticipation over different generations has been suggested. Genetic factors modifying the clinical phenotype have been proposed, including genetic variation in other known disease genes, the genomic context of the C9orf72 repeat, and expanded repeat size, which has been estimated between 45 and several thousand units...
January 27, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108534/cell-biology-and-pathophysiology-of-%C3%AE-synuclein
#19
Jacqueline Burré, Manu Sharma, Thomas C Südhof
α-Synuclein is an abundant neuronal protein that is highly enriched in presynaptic nerve terminals. Genetics and neuropathology studies link α-synuclein to Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Accumulation of misfolded oligomers and larger aggregates of α-synuclein defines multiple neurodegenerative diseases called synucleinopathies, but the mechanisms by which α-synuclein acts in neurodegeneration are unknown. Moreover, the normal cellular function of α-synuclein remains debated...
January 20, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108533/noncerebral-amyloidoses-aspects-on-seeding-cross-seeding-and-transmission
#20
Gunilla T Westermark, Marcus Fändrich, Katarzyna Lundmark, Per Westermark
More than 30 proteins form amyloid in humans, most of them outside of the brain. Deposition of amyloid in extracerebral tissues is very common and seems inevitable for an aging person. Most deposits are localized, small, and probably without consequence, but in some instances, they are associated with diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Other extracerebral amyloidoses are systemic, with life-threatening effects on the heart, kidneys, and other organs. Here, we review how amyloid may spread through seeding and whether transmission of amyloid diseases may occur between humans...
January 20, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
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