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Frontiers in Immunology

Linda Ziani, Salem Chouaib, Jerome Thiery
Among cells present in the tumor microenvironment, activated fibroblasts termed cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), play a critical role in the complex process of tumor-stroma interaction. CAFs, one of the prominent stromal cell populations in most types of human carcinomas, have been involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, cancer stemness, extracellular matrix remodeling, tissue invasion, metastasis, and even chemoresistance. During the past decade, these activated tumor-associated fibroblasts have also been involved in the modulation of the anti-tumor immune response on various levels...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Jeliazko R Jeliazkov, Adnan Sljoka, Daisuke Kuroda, Nobuyuki Tsuchimura, Naoki Katoh, Kouhei Tsumoto, Jeffrey J Gray
Antibodies can rapidly evolve in specific response to antigens. Affinity maturation drives this evolution through cycles of mutation and selection leading to enhanced antibody specificity and affinity. Elucidating the biophysical mechanisms that underlie affinity maturation is fundamental to understanding B-cell immunity. An emergent hypothesis is that affinity maturation reduces the conformational flexibility of the antibody's antigen-binding paratope to minimize entropic losses incurred upon binding. In recent years, computational and experimental approaches have tested this hypothesis on a small number of antibodies, often observing a decrease in the flexibility of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops that typically comprise the paratope and in particular the CDR-H3 loop, which contributes a plurality of antigen contacts...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Hui Fang, Yang Zhang, Ning Li, Gang Wang, Zhi Liu
Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune and inflammatory skin disease associated with subepidermal blistering and autoantibodies directed against the hemidesmosomal components BP180 and BP230. Animal models of BP were developed by passively transferring anti-BP180 IgG into mice, which recapitulates the key features of human BP. By using these in vivo model systems, key cellular and molecular events leading to the BP disease phenotype are identified, including binding of pathogenic IgG to its target, complement activation of the classical pathway, mast cell degranulation, and infiltration and activation of neutrophils...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Erica J Brodie, Simona Infantino, Michael S Y Low, David M Tarlinton
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a progressive autoimmune disease characterized by increased sensitivity to self-antigens, auto-antibody production, and systemic inflammation. B cells have been implicated in disease progression and as such represent an attractive therapeutic target. Lyn is a Src family tyrosine kinase that plays a major role in regulating signaling pathways within B cells as well as other hematopoietic cells. Its role in initiating negative signaling cascades is especially critical as exemplified by Lyn-/- mice developing an SLE-like disease with plasma cell hyperplasia, underscoring the importance of tightly regulating signaling within B cells...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Ana Cardoso, Antonio Gil Castro, Ana Catarina Martins, Guilhermina M Carriche, Valentine Murigneux, Isabel Castro, Ana Cumano, Paulo Vieira, Margarida Saraiva
Inflammatory bowel disease encompasses a group of chronic-inflammatory conditions of the colon and small intestine. These conditions are characterized by exacerbated inflammation of the organ that greatly affects the quality of life of patients. Molecular mechanisms counteracting this hyperinflammatory status of the gut offer strategies for therapeutic intervention. Among these regulatory molecules is the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, as shown in mice and humans. Indeed, IL-10 signaling, particularly in macrophages, is essential for intestinal homeostasis...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Xu Wang, Deyu Chen
Purinergic signaling, which utilizes nucleotides (particularly ATP) and adenosine as transmitter molecules, plays an essential role in immune system. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a pro-inflammatory molecule through activation of P2 receptors, whereas adenosine mostly functions as an anti-inflammatory molecule through activation of P1 receptors. Neutrophils are the most abundant immune cells in circulation and have emerged as an important component in orchestrating a complex series of events during inflammation...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Seow Theng Ong, Madhavi Latha Somaraju Chalasani, M H U Turabe Fazil, Praseetha Prasannan, Atish Kizhakeyil, Graham D Wright, Dermot Kelleher, Navin Kumar Verma
Centrosome- and Golgi-localized protein kinase N-associated protein (CG-NAP), also known as AKAP450, is a cytosolic scaffolding protein involved in the targeted positioning of multiple signaling molecules, which are critical for cellular functioning. Here, we show that CG-NAP is predominantly expressed in human primary T-lymphocytes, localizes in close proximity (<0.2 μm) with centrosomal and Golgi structures and serves as a docking platform for Protein Kinase A (PKA). GapmeR-mediated knockdown of CG-NAP inhibits LFA-1-induced T-cell migration and impairs T-cell chemotaxis toward the chemokine SDF-1α...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Anas H Abu-Humaidan, Malin Elvén, Andreas Sonesson, Peter Garred, Ole E Sørensen
The complement system is an ancient part of the innate immune system important for both tissue homeostasis and host defense. However, bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (SA) possess elaborative mechanisms for evading both the complement system and other parts of the immune system. One of these evasive mechanisms-important in causing chronic and therapy resistant infections-is the intracellular persistence in non-immune cells. The objective of our study was to investigate whether persistent intracellular SA infection of epidermal keratinocytes resulted in complement activation...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Daniela Dukovska, Daniel Fernández-Soto, Mar Valés-Gómez, Hugh T Reyburn
The biology and function of NKG2H receptor, unlike the better characterized members of the NKG2 family NKG2A, NKG2C, and NKG2D, remains largely unclear. Here, we show that NKG2H is able to associate with the signaling adapter molecules DAP12 and DAP10 suggesting that this receptor can signal for cell activation. Using a recently described NKG2H-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), we have characterized the expression and function of lymphocytes that express this receptor. NKG2H is expressed at the cell surface of a small percentage of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and is found more frequently on T cells, rather than NK cells...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Nicolle H R Litjens, Lotte van der Wagen, Jurgen Kuball, Jaap Kwekkeboom
Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can cause significant complications after transplantation, but recent emerging data suggest that CMV may paradoxically also exert beneficial effects in two specific allogeneic transplant settings. These potential benefits have been underappreciated and are therefore highlighted in this review. First, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell-replete grafts, CMV reactivation is associated with protection from leukemic relapse...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Ole Petter Rekvig
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inadequately defined syndrome. Etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. SLE is on the other hand a seminal syndrome that has challenged immunologists, biologists, genetics, and clinicians to solve its nature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple, etiologically unlinked manifestations. Unexpectedly, they seem to occur in different stochastically linked clusters, although single gene defects may promote a smaller spectrum of symptoms/criteria typical for SLE...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Neha M Sahasrabudhe, Martin Beukema, Lingmin Tian, Berit Troost, Jan Scholte, Erik Bruininx, Geert Bruggeman, Marco van den Berg, Anton Scheurink, Henk A Schols, Marijke M Faas, Paul de Vos
Dietary carbohydrate fibers are known to prevent immunological diseases common in Western countries such as allergy and asthma but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Until now beneficial effects of dietary fibers are mainly attributed to fermentation products of the fibers such as anti-inflammatory short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Here, we found and present a new mechanism by which dietary fibers can be anti-inflammatory: a commonly consumed fiber, pectin, blocks innate immune receptors. We show that pectin binds and inhibits, toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and specifically inhibits the proinflammatory TLR2-TLR1 pathway while the tolerogenic TLR2-TLR6 pathway remains unaltered...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Victoria Sundblad, Amado A Quintar, Luciano G Morosi, Sonia I Niveloni, Ana Cabanne, Edgardo Smecuol, Eduardo Mauriño, Karina V Mariño, Julio C Bai, Cristina A Maldonado, Gabriel A Rabinovich
Galectins, a family of animal lectins characterized by their affinity for N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates, modulate several immune cell processes shaping the course of innate and adaptive immune responses. Through interaction with a wide range of glycosylated receptors bearing complex branched N-glycans and core 2-O-glycans, these endogenous lectins trigger distinct signaling programs thereby controling immune cell activation, differentiation, recruitment and survival. Given the unique features of mucosal inflammation and the differential expression of galectins throughout the gastrointestinal tract, we discuss here key findings on the role of galectins in intestinal inflammation, particularly Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease (CeD) patients, as well as in murine models resembling these inflammatory conditions...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Piera Valenti, Luigi Rosa, Daniela Capobianco, Maria Stefania Lepanto, Elisa Schiavi, Antimo Cutone, Rosalba Paesano, Paola Mastromarino
The innate defense system of the female mucosal genital tract involves a close and complex interaction among the healthy vaginal microbiota, different cells, and various proteins that protect the host from pathogens. Vaginal lactobacilli and lactoferrin represent two essential actors in the vaginal environment. Lactobacilli represent the dominant bacterial species able to prevent facultative and obligate anaerobes outnumber in vaginal microbiota maintaining healthy microbial homeostasis. Several mechanisms underlie the protection exerted by lactobacilli: competition for nutrients and tissue adherence, reduction of the vaginal pH, modulation of immunity, and production of bioactive compounds...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Zhaodong Li, Ludovica F Buttó, Kristine-Anne Buela, Li-Guo Jia, Minh Lam, John D Ward, Theresa T Pizarro, Fabio Cominelli
Death receptor 3 (DR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, has been implicated in regulating T-helper type-1 (TH 1), type-2 (TH 2), and type-17 (TH 17) responses as well as regulatory T cell (Treg ) and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) functions during immune-mediated diseases. However, the role of DR3 in controlling lymphocyte functions in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that activation of DR3 signaling modulates Treg expansion suggesting that stimulation of DR3 represents a potential therapeutic target in human inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease (CD)...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Delphine Lumbroso, Soaad Soboh, Avi Maimon, Sagie Schif-Zuck, Amiram Ariel, Tal Burstyn-Cohen
The complete resolution of inflammation requires the uptake of apoptotic polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) by local macrophages (efferocytosis) and the consequent reprogramming of the engulfing phagocytes to reparative and pro-resolving phenotypes. The tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (collectively named TAM) are fundamental mediators in regulating inflammatory responses and efferocytosis. Protein S (PROS1) is a ligand for all TAM receptors that mediates various aspects of their activity. However, the involvement of PROS1 in the resolution of inflammation is incompletely understood...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
JooYeon Jhun, Seung Hoon Lee, Soon Kyu Lee, Hee Yeon Kim, Eun Sun Jung, Dong Goo Kim, JeongWon Choi, Si Hyun Bae, Seung Kew Yoon, Byung Ha Chung, Chul Woo Yang, Mi-La Cho, Jong Young Choi
Recipients of liver transplantation (LT) require long-term immunosuppressive drug treatment, but lifelong immunosuppressive treatment has severe side effects. It is known that some LT recipients develop immune tolerance, and although the development of such operational tolerance should allow a decrease in the burden of immunosuppressive drug treatment, the factors that indicate operational tolerance are not clear. This study aimed to monitor immunological markers over time in LT recipients to identify those markers indicating the development of operational tolerance...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Marco A Moro-García, Juan C Mayo, Rosa M Sainz, Rebeca Alonso-Arias
T lymphocytes, from their first encounter with their specific antigen as naïve cell until the last stages of their differentiation, in a replicative state of senescence, go through a series of phases. In several of these stages, T lymphocytes are subjected to exponential growth in successive encounters with the same antigen. This entire process occurs throughout the life of a human individual and, earlier, in patients with chronic infections/pathologies through inflammatory mediators, first acutely and later in a chronic form...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Lorenza Tulli, Francesca Cattaneo, Juliette Vinot, Cosima T Baldari, Ugo D'Oro
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the activation of innate immune cells, in which their engagement leads to production of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules. TLRs signaling requires recruitment of toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing adaptors, such as MyD88 and/or TRIF, and leads to activation of several transcription factors, such as NF-κB, the AP1 complex, and various members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, which in turn results in triggering of several cellular functions associated with these receptors...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Seung Yub Han, Alesia Antoine, David Howard, Bryant Chang, Woo Sung Chang, Matthew Slein, Gintaras Deikus, Sofia Kossida, Patrice Duroux, Marie-Paule Lefranc, Robert P Sebra, Melissa L Smith, Ismael Ben F Fofana
The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pathogenesis is critical for furthering our understanding of the role of antibody responses in the prevention of HIV infection, and will only increase in importance as macaque immunoglobulin (IG) gene databases are expanded. We have previously reported the construction of a phage display library from a SIV-infected rhesus macaque ( Macaca mulatta ) using oligonucleotide primers based on human IG gene sequences...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
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