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Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28082127/beyond-dual-systems-a-genetically-informed-latent-factor-model-of-behavioral-and-self-report-measures-related-to-adolescent-risk-taking
#1
K Paige Harden, Natalie Kretsch, Frank D Mann, Kathrin Herzhoff, Jennifer L Tackett, Laurence Steinberg, Elliot M Tucker-Drob
The dual systems model posits that adolescent risk-taking results from an imbalance between a cognitive control system and an incentive processing system. Researchers interested in understanding the development of adolescent risk-taking use a diverse array of behavioral and self-report measures to index cognitive control and incentive processing. It is currently unclear whether different measures commonly interpreted as indicators of the same psychological construct do, in fact, tap the same underlying dimension of individual differences...
December 26, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089657/autism-spectrum-disorder-in-the-scope-of-tactile-processing
#2
REVIEW
Mark Mikkelsen, Ericka L Wodka, Stewart H Mostofsky, Nicolaas A J Puts
Sensory processing abnormalities are among the most common behavioral phenotypes seen in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), typically characterized by either over- or under-responsiveness to stimulation. In this review, we focus on tactile processing dysfunction in ASD. We firstly review clinical studies wherein sensitivity to tactile stimuli has traditionally been assessed by self-, parent- and experimenter-reports. We also discuss recent investigations using psychophysical paradigms that gauge individual tactile thresholds...
December 23, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088648/the-influence-of-5-httlpr-transporter-genotype-on-amygdala-subgenual-anterior-cingulate-cortex-connectivity-in-autism-spectrum-disorder
#3
Francisco Velasquez, Jillian Lee Wiggins, Whitney I Mattson, Donna M Martin, Catherine Lord, Christopher S Monk
Social deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are linked to amygdala functioning and functional connection between the amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC) is involved in the modulation of amygdala activity. Impairments in behavioral symptoms and amygdala activation and connectivity with the sACC seem to vary by serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) variant genotype in diverse populations. The current preliminary investigation examines whether amygdala-sACC connectivity differs by 5-HTTLPR genotype and relates to social functioning in ASD...
December 23, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28081519/interoception-and-psychopathology-a-developmental-neuroscience-perspective
#4
REVIEW
Jennifer Murphy, Rebecca Brewer, Caroline Catmur, Geoffrey Bird
Interoception refers to the perception of the physiological condition of the body, including hunger, temperature, and heart rate. There is a growing appreciation that interoception is integral to higher-order cognition. Indeed, existing research indicates an association between low interoceptive sensitivity and alexithymia (a difficulty identifying one's own emotion), underscoring the link between bodily and emotional awareness. Despite this appreciation, the developmental trajectory of interoception across the lifespan remains under-researched, with clear gaps in our understanding...
December 23, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089656/how-do-antidepressants-influence-the-bold-signal-in-the-developing-brain
#5
REVIEW
Julia J Harris, Clare Reynell
Depression is a highly prevalent life-threatening disorder, with its first onset commonly occurring during adolescence. Adolescent depression is increasingly being treated with antidepressants, such as fluoxetine. The use of medication during this sensitive period of physiological and cognitive brain development produces neurobiological changes, some of which may outlast the course of treatment. In this review, we look at how antidepressant treatment in adolescence is likely to alter neurovascular coupling and brain energy use and how these changes, in turn, affect our ability to identify neuronal activity changes between participant groups...
December 21, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088647/the-developmental-relationship-between-specific-cognitive-domains-and-grey-matter-in-the-cerebellum
#6
Dorothea M Moore, Anila M D'Mello, Lauren M McGrath, Catherine J Stoodley
There is growing evidence that the cerebellum is involved in cognition and cognitive development, yet little is known about the developmental relationship between cerebellar structure and cognitive subdomains in children. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess the relationship between cerebellar grey matter (GM) and language, reading, working memory, executive function, and processing speed in 110 individuals aged 8-17 years from the Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics (PING) Study. Further, we examined the effect of age on the relationships between cerebellar GM and cognition...
December 21, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077245/a-systematic-review-of-adrenarche-as-a-sensitive-period-in-neurobiological-development-and-mental-health
#7
REVIEW
Michelle L Byrne, Sarah Whittle, Nandita Vijayakumar, Meg Dennison, Julian G Simmons, Nicholas B Allen
Substantial hormonal and neurobiological changes occur during puberty, and are widely argued to render this period of life a sensitive period in terms of risk for mental health problems. However, there is a paucity of research focusing on adrenarche, the earlier phase of pubertal development. Furthermore, there is a limited understanding of the association between adrenarche and neural development during this phase of life. We systematically reviewed research examining human adrenarcheal development as operationalized by hormonal levels of DHEA and DHEA-S, in relation to indices of mental health (Systematic Review 1)...
December 21, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012401/using-fnirs-to-examine-occipital-and-temporal-responses-to-stimulus-repetition-in-young-infants-evidence-of-selective-frontal-cortex-involvement
#8
Lauren L Emberson, Grace Cannon, Holly Palmeri, John E Richards, Richard N Aslin
How does the developing brain respond to recent experience? Repetition suppression (RS) is a robust and well-characterized response of to recent experience found, predominantly, in the perceptual cortices of the adult brain. We use functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to investigate how perceptual (temporal and occipital) and frontal cortices in the infant brain respond to auditory and visual stimulus repetitions (spoken words and faces). In Experiment 1, we find strong evidence of repetition suppression in the frontal cortex but only for auditory stimuli...
December 15, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063823/but-is-helping-you-worth-the-risk-defining-prosocial-risk-taking-in-adolescence
#9
REVIEW
Kathy T Do, João F Guassi Moreira, Eva H Telzer
Recent work has shown that the same neural circuitry that typically underlies risky behaviors also contributes to prosocial behaviors. Despite the striking overlap between two seemingly distinct behavioral patterns, little is known about how risk taking and prosociality interact and inform adolescent decision making. We review literature on adolescent brain development as it pertains to risk taking and prosociality and propose a new area of study, Prosocial Risk Taking, which suggests that adolescents can make risky decisions with the intention of helping other individuals...
December 6, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28017265/cortical-specialisation-to-social-stimuli-from-the-first-days-to-the-second-year-of-life-a-rural-gambian-cohort
#10
S Lloyd-Fox, K Begus, D Halliday, L Pirazzoli, A Blasi, M Papademetriou, M K Darboe, A M Prentice, M H Johnson, S E Moore, C E Elwell
Brain and nervous system development in human infants during the first 1000days (conception to two years of age) is critical, and compromised development during this time (such as from under nutrition or poverty) can have life-long effects on physical growth and cognitive function. Cortical mapping of cognitive function during infancy is poorly understood in resource-poor settings due to the lack of transportable and low-cost neuroimaging methods. Having established a signature cortical response to social versus non-social visual and auditory stimuli in infants from 4 to 6 months of age in the UK, here we apply this functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) paradigm to investigate social responses in infants from the first postnatal days to the second year of life in two contrasting environments: rural Gambian and urban UK...
November 27, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011437/childhood-poverty-is-associated-with-altered-hippocampal-function-and-visuospatial-memory-in-adulthood
#11
Elizabeth R Duval, Sarah N Garfinkel, James E Swain, Gary W Evans, Erika K Blackburn, Mike Angstadt, Chandra S Sripada, Israel Liberzon
Childhood poverty is a risk factor for poorer cognitive performance during childhood and adulthood. While evidence linking childhood poverty and memory deficits in adulthood has been accumulating, underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. To investigate neurobiological links between childhood poverty and adult memory performance, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a visuospatial memory task in healthy young adults with varying income levels during childhood. Participants were assessed at age 9 and followed through young adulthood to assess income and related factors...
November 27, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011436/phonological-abilities-in-literacy-impaired-children-brain-potentials-reveal-deficient-phoneme-discrimination-but-intact-prosodic-processing
#12
Claudia Männel, Gesa Schaadt, Franziska K Illner, Elke van der Meer, Angela D Friederici
Intact phonological processing is crucial for successful literacy acquisition. While individuals with difficulties in reading and spelling (i.e., developmental dyslexia) are known to experience deficient phoneme discrimination (i.e., segmental phonology), findings concerning their prosodic processing (i.e., suprasegmental phonology) are controversial. Because there are no behavior-independent studies on the underlying neural correlates of prosodic processing in dyslexia, these controversial findings might be explained by different task demands...
November 27, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919003/altered-patterns-of-directed-connectivity-within-the-reading-network-of-dyslexic-children-and-their-relation-to-reading-dysfluency
#13
Gojko Žarić, João M Correia, Gorka Fraga González, Jurgen Tijms, Maurtis W van der Molen, Leo Blomert, Milene Bonte
Reading is a complex cognitive skill subserved by a distributed network of visual and language-related regions. Disruptions of connectivity within this network have been associated with developmental dyslexia but their relation to individual differences in the severity of reading problems remains unclear. Here we investigate whether dysfunctional connectivity scales with the level of reading dysfluency by examining EEG recordings during visual word and false font processing in 9-year-old typically reading children (TR) and two groups of dyslexic children: severely dysfluent (SDD) and moderately dysfluent (MDD) dyslexics...
November 19, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908562/ontogeny-of-sensorimotor-gating-and-short-term-memory-processing-throughout-the-adolescent-period-in-rats
#14
Anja A Goepfrich, Chris M Friemel, Sabina Pauen, Miriam Schneider
Adolescence and puberty are highly susceptible developmental periods during which the neuronal organization and maturation of the brain is completed. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, which is well known to modulate cognitive processing, undergoes profound and transient developmental changes during adolescence. With the present study we were aiming to examine the ontogeny of cognitive skills throughout adolescence in male rats and clarify the potential modulatory role of CB1 receptor signalling. Cognitive skills were assessed repeatedly every 10th day in rats throughout adolescence...
November 19, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908561/beyond-eye-gaze-what-else-can-eyetracking-reveal-about-cognition-and-cognitive-development
#15
REVIEW
Maria K Eckstein, Belén Guerra-Carrillo, Alison T Miller Singley, Silvia A Bunge
This review provides an introduction to two eyetracking measures that can be used to study cognitive development and plasticity: pupil dilation and spontaneous blink rate. We begin by outlining the rich history of gaze analysis, which can reveal the current focus of attention as well as cognitive strategies. We then turn to the two lesser-utilized ocular measures. Pupil dilation is modulated by the brain's locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system, which controls physiological arousal and attention, and has been used as a measure of subjective task difficulty, mental effort, and neural gain...
November 11, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852514/adult-like-processing-of-time-compressed-speech-by-newborns-a-nirs-study
#16
Cécile Issard, Judit Gervain
Humans can adapt to a wide range of variations in the speech signal, maintaining an invariant representation of the linguistic information it contains. Among them, adaptation to rapid or time-compressed speech has been well studied in adults, but the developmental origin of this capacity remains unknown. Does this ability depend on experience with speech (if yes, as heard in utero or as heard postnatally), with sounds in general or is it experience-independent? Using near-infrared spectroscopy, we show that the newborn brain can discriminate between three different compression rates: normal, i...
October 29, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27840157/sensitive-periods-of-substance-abuse-early-risk-for-the-transition-to-dependence
#17
REVIEW
Chloe J Jordan, Susan L Andersen
Early adolescent substance use dramatically increases the risk of lifelong substance use disorder (SUD). An adolescent sensitive period evolved to allow the development of risk-taking traits that aid in survival; today these may manifest as a vulnerability to drugs of abuse. Early substance use interferes with ongoing neurodevelopment to induce neurobiological changes that further augment SUD risk. Although many individuals use drugs recreationally, only a small percentage transition to SUD. Current theories on the etiology of addiction can lend insights into the risk factors that increase vulnerability from early recreational use to addiction...
October 29, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27825732/cognitive-components-underpinning-the-development-of-model-based-learning
#18
Tracey C S Potter, Nessa V Bryce, Catherine A Hartley
Reinforcement learning theory distinguishes "model-free" learning, which fosters reflexive repetition of previously rewarded actions, from "model-based" learning, which recruits a mental model of the environment to flexibly select goal-directed actions. Whereas model-free learning is evident across development, recruitment of model-based learning appears to increase with age. However, the cognitive processes underlying the development of model-based learning remain poorly characterized. Here, we examined whether age-related differences in cognitive processes underlying the construction and flexible recruitment of mental models predict developmental increases in model-based choice...
October 29, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27838595/lower-neighborhood-quality-in-adolescence-predicts-higher-mesolimbic-sensitivity-to-reward-anticipation-in-adulthood
#19
Marlen Z Gonzalez, Joseph P Allen, James A Coan
Life history theory suggests that adult reward sensitivity should be best explained by childhood, but not current, socioeconomic conditions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, 83 participants from a larger longitudinal sample completed the monetary incentive delay (MID) task in adulthood (∼25 years old). Parent-reports of neighborhood quality and parental SES were collected when participants were 13 years of age. Current income level was collected concurrently with scanning. Lower adolescent neighborhood quality, but neither lower current income nor parental SES, was associated with heightened sensitivity to the anticipation of monetary gain in putative mesolimbic reward areas...
December 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837677/5-httlpr-polymorphism-is-linked-to-neural-mechanisms-of-selective-attention-in-preschoolers-from-lower-socioeconomic-status-backgrounds
#20
Elif Isbell, Courtney Stevens, Amanda Hampton Wray, Theodore Bell, Helen J Neville
While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40-67 months), who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR...
December 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
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