journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30391756/modality-independent-recruitment-of-inferior-frontal-cortex-during-speech-processing-in-human-infants
#1
Nicole Altvater-Mackensen, Tobias Grossmann
Despite increasing interest in the development of audiovisual speech perception in infancy, the underlying mechanisms and neural processes are still only poorly understood. In addition to regions in temporal cortex associated with speech processing and multimodal integration, such as superior temporal sulcus, left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) has been suggested to be critically involved in mapping information from different modalities during speech perception. To further illuminate the role of IFC during infant language learning and speech perception, the current study examined the processing of auditory, visual and audiovisual speech in 6-month-old infants using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)...
October 30, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30318345/on-mindful-and-mindless-physical-activity-and-executive-function-a-response-to-diamond-and-ling-2016
#2
Charles H Hillman, Edward McAuley, Kirk I Erickson, Teresa Liu-Ambrose, Arthur F Kramer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 11, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30448644/neural-measures-of-anticipatory-bodily-attention-in-children-relations-with-executive-function
#3
Staci Meredith Weiss, Andrew N Meltzoff, Peter J Marshall
The ability to selectively direct attention to a certain location or modality is a key neurocognitive skill. One important facet of selective attention is anticipation, a foundational biological construct that bridges basic perceptual processes and higher-order cognition. The current study focuses on the neural correlates of bodily anticipation in 6- to 8-year-old children using a task involving tactile stimulation. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity over sensorimotor cortex was measured after a visual cue directed children to monitor their right or left hand in anticipation of tactile stimulation...
September 29, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30415185/do-you-know-what-i-m-thinking-temporal-and-spatial-brain-activity-during-a-theory-of-mind-task-in-children-with-autism
#4
Veronica Yuk, Charline Urbain, Elizabeth W Pang, Evdokia Anagnostou, Daphna Buchsbaum, Margot J Taylor
The social impairments observed in children with autism spectrum disorder are thought to arise in part from deficits in theory of mind, the ability to understand other people's thoughts and feelings. To determine the temporal-spatial dynamics of brain activity underlying these atypical theory-of-mind processes, we used magnetoencephalography to characterize the sequence of functional brain patterns (i.e. when and where) related to theory-of-mind reasoning in 19 high-functioning children with autism compared to 22 age- and sex-matched typically-developing children aged 8-12 during a false-belief (theory-of-mind) task...
September 29, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336447/alpha-keeps-it-together-alpha-oscillatory-synchrony-underlies-working-memory-maintenance-in-young-children
#5
Julie Sato, Sarah I Mossad, Simeon M Wong, Benjamin A E Hunt, Benjamin T Dunkley, Mary Lou Smith, Charline Urbain, Margot J Taylor
Working Memory (WM) supports a wide range of cognitive functions, and is positively associated with academic achievement. Although fMRI studies have revealed WM networks in adults, little is known about how these networks develop to support successful WM performance in children. Using magnetoencephalography, we examined the networks underlying the maintenance of visual information in 6-year-old children. We observed an increase in mean whole-brain connectivity that was specific to the alpha frequency band during the retention interval associated with correct compared to incorrect responses...
September 29, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30318344/word-selectivity-in-high-level-visual-cortex-and-reading-skill
#6
Emily C Kubota, Sung Jun Joo, Elizabeth Huber, Jason D Yeatman
Word-selective neural responses in human ventral occipito-temporal cortex (VOTC) emerge as children learn to read, creating a visual word form area (VWFA) in the literate brain. It has been suggested that the VWFA arises through competition between pre-existing selectivity for other stimulus categories, changing the topography of VOTC to support rapid word recognition. Here, we hypothesized that competition between words and objects would be resolved as children acquire reading skill. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined the relationship between responses to words and objects in VOTC in two ways...
September 29, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30316637/the-ontogeny-of-memory-persistence-and-specificity
#7
REVIEW
Adam I Ramsaran, Margaret L Schlichting, Paul W Frankland
Interest in the ontogeny of memory blossomed in the twentieth century following the initial observations that memories from infancy and early childhood are rapidly forgotten. The intense exploration of infantile amnesia in subsequent years has led to a thorough characterization of its psychological determinants, although the neurobiology of memory persistence has long remained elusive. By contrast, other phenomena in the ontogeny of memory like infantile generalization have received relatively less attention...
September 29, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30384956/modeling-developmental-change-contemporary-approaches-to-key-methodological-challenges-in-developmental-neuroimaging
#8
EDITORIAL
Jennifer H Pfeifer, Nicholas B Allen, Michelle L Byrne, Kathryn L Mills
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29960860/when-change-is-the-only-constant-the-promise-of-longitudinal-neuroimaging-in-understanding-social-anxiety-disorder
#9
REVIEW
Simone P W Haller, Kathryn L Mills, Charlotte E Hartwright, Anthony S David, Kathrin Cohen Kadosh
Longitudinal studies offer a unique window into developmental change. Yet, most of what we know about the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders is based on cross-sectional work. Here, we highlight the importance of adopting a longitudinal approach in order to make progress towards identifying the neurobiological mechanisms of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Using examples, we illustrate how longitudinal data can uniquely inform SAD etiology and timing of interventions. The brain's inherently adaptive quality requires that we model risk correlates of disorders as dynamic in their expression...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29456104/methodological-considerations-for-developmental-longitudinal-fmri-research
#10
REVIEW
Eva H Telzer, Ethan M McCormick, Sabine Peters, Danielle Cosme, Jennifer H Pfeifer, Anna C K van Duijvenvoorde
There has been a large spike in longitudinal fMRI studies in recent years, and so it is essential that researchers carefully assess the limitations and challenges afforded by longitudinal designs. In this article, we provide an overview of important considerations for longitudinal fMRI research in developmental samples, including task design, sampling strategies, and group-level analyses. We first discuss considerations for task designs, weighing the pros and cons of many commonly used tasks, as well as outlining how the tasks may be impacted by repeated exposure...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29397345/variability-of-the-hemodynamic-response-in-infants-influence-of-experimental-design-and-stimulus-complexity
#11
REVIEW
C├ęcile Issard, Judit Gervain
Measuring brain activity in developmental populations remains a major challenge despite great technological advances. Among the numerous available methods, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an imaging modality that probes the hemodynamic response, is a powerful tool for recording brain activity in a great variety of situations and populations. Neurocognitive studies with infants have often reported inverted hemodynamic responses, i.e. a decrease instead of an increase in regional blood oxygenation, but the exact physiological explanation and cognitive interpretation of this response remain unclear...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29395939/longitudinal-modeling-in-developmental-neuroimaging-research-common-challenges-and-solutions-from-developmental-psychology
#12
REVIEW
Kevin M King, Andrew K Littlefield, Connor J McCabe, Kathryn L Mills, John Flournoy, Laurie Chassin
Hypotheses about change over time are central to informing our understanding of development. Developmental neuroscience is at critical juncture: although the majority of longitudinal imaging studies have observations with two time points, researchers are increasingly obtaining three or more observations of the same individuals. The goals of the proposed manuscript are to draw upon the long history of methodological and applied literature on longitudinal statistical models to summarize common problems and issues that arise in their use...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325701/developmental-cognitive-neuroscience-using-latent-change-score-models-a-tutorial-and-applications
#13
REVIEW
Rogier A Kievit, Andreas M Brandmaier, Gabriel Ziegler, Anne-Laura van Harmelen, Susanne M M de Mooij, Michael Moutoussis, Ian M Goodyer, Ed Bullmore, Peter B Jones, Peter Fonagy, Ulman Lindenberger, Raymond J Dolan
Assessing and analysing individual differences in change over time is of central scientific importance to developmental neuroscience. However, the literature is based largely on cross-sectional comparisons, which reflect a variety of influences and cannot directly represent change. We advocate using latent change score (LCS) models in longitudinal samples as a statistical framework to tease apart the complex processes underlying lifespan development in brain and behaviour using longitudinal data. LCS models provide a flexible framework that naturally accommodates key developmental questions as model parameters and can even be used, with some limitations, in cases with only two measurement occasions...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239832/magnetic-resonance-elastography-for-examining-developmental-changes-in-the-mechanical-properties-of-the-brain
#14
REVIEW
Curtis L Johnson, Eva H Telzer
Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a quantitative imaging technique for noninvasively characterizing tissue mechanical properties, and has recently emerged as a valuable tool for neuroimaging. The measured mechanical properties reflect the microstructural composition and organization of neural tissue, and have shown significant effects in many neurological conditions and normal, healthy aging, and evidence has emerged supporting novel relationships between mechanical structure and cognitive function. The sensitivity of MRE to brain structure, function, and health make it an ideal technique for studying the developing brain; however, brain MRE studies on children and adolescents have only just begun...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29229299/diffusion-mri-of-white-matter-microstructure-development-in-childhood-and-adolescence-methods-challenges-and-progress
#15
REVIEW
Christian K Tamnes, David R Roalf, Anne-Lise Goddings, Catherine Lebel
Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) continues to grow in popularity as a useful neuroimaging method to study brain development, and longitudinal studies that track the same individuals over time are emerging. Over the last decade, seminal work using dMRI has provided new insights into the development of brain white matter (WM) microstructure, connections and networks throughout childhood and adolescence. This review provides an introduction to dMRI, both diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and other dMRI models, as well as common acquisition and analysis approaches...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29223425/assessing-age-dependent-multi-task-functional-co-activation-changes-using-measures-of-task-potency
#16
Roselyne J Chauvin, Maarten Mennes, Jan K Buitelaar, Christian F Beckmann
It is being hypothesised that the developing adolescent brain is increasingly enlisting long-range connectivity, allowing improved communication between spatially distant brain regions. The developmental trajectories of such maturational changes remain elusive. Here, we aim to study how the brain engages in multiple tasks (working memory, reward processing, and inhibition) at the network-level and evaluate how effects of age across these tasks are related to each other. We characterise how the brain departs from its functional baseline architecture towards task-induced functional connectivity modulations using a novel measure called task potency, allowing direct comparison between tasks by defining sensitivity to one or multiple tasks...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221915/structural-brain-development-a-review-of-methodological-approaches-and-best-practices
#17
REVIEW
Nandita Vijayakumar, Kathryn L Mills, Aaron Alexander-Bloch, Christian K Tamnes, Sarah Whittle
Continued advances in neuroimaging technologies and statistical modelling capabilities have improved our knowledge of structural brain development in children and adolescents. While this has provided an increasingly nuanced understanding of brain development, the field is still plagued by inconsistent findings. This review highlights the methodological diversity in existing longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on structural brain development during childhood and adolescence, and addresses how such variation might contribute to inconsistencies in the literature...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196032/current-methods-and-limitations-for-longitudinal-fmri-analysis-across-development
#18
Tara Madhyastha, Matthew Peverill, Natalie Koh, Connor McCabe, John Flournoy, Kate Mills, Kevin King, Jennifer Pfeifer, Katie A McLaughlin
The human brain is remarkably plastic. The brain changes dramatically across development, with ongoing functional development continuing well into the third decade of life and substantial changes occurring again in older age. Dynamic changes in brain function are thought to underlie the innumerable changes in cognition, emotion, and behavior that occur across development. The brain also changes in response to experience, which raises important questions about how the environment influences the developing brain...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29158073/methodological-challenges-in-the-comparison-of-infant-fmri-across-age-groups
#19
REVIEW
Rhodri Cusack, Olivia McCuaig, Annika C Linke
Functional MRI (fMRI) in infants is rapidly growing and providing fundamental insights into the origins of brain functions. Comparing brain development at different ages is particularly powerful, but there are a number of methodological challenges that must be addressed if confounds are to be avoided. With development, brains change in composition in a way that alters their tissue contrast, and in size, shape, and gyrification, requiring careful image processing strategies and age-specific standard templates...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29158072/test-retest-reliability-of-longitudinal-task-based-fmri-implications-for-developmental-studies
#20
REVIEW
Megan M Herting, Prapti Gautam, Zhanghua Chen, Adam Mezher, Nora C Vetter
Great advances have been made in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies, including the use of longitudinal design to more accurately identify changes in brain development across childhood and adolescence. While longitudinal fMRI studies are necessary for our understanding of typical and atypical patterns of brain development, the variability observed in fMRI blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal and its test-retest reliability in developing populations remain a concern. Here we review the current state of test-retest reliability for child and adolescent fMRI studies (ages 5-18 years) as indexed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC)...
October 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
journal
journal
43272
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"