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IEEE Pulse

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328496/brain-over-brawn-smart-imaging-innovations-open-windows-on-muscle-provide-hope-for-treating-degenerating-diseases-and-more
#1
Leslie Mertz
As much as we know about the vitamins, minerals, and types of exercise important to promoting good muscle health, many fundamental questions remain about skeletal and cardiac muscle.
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328495/the-modern-cochlear-implant-a-triumph-of-biomedical-engineering-and-the-first-substantial-restoration-of-human-sense-using-a-medical-intervention
#2
Blake S Wilson
Even as recently as the mid-1980s, many experts in otology and auditory science thought that restoration of useful hearing with crude and pervasive electrical stimulation of the cochlea was a fool's dream. The esteemed Prof. Rainer Klinke from Frankfurt (Figure 1) was among the chorus of critics, asserting in 1978 that "from a physiological point of view, cochlear implants will not work." Many others made similar categorical statements.
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328494/hearing-aid-technology-for-the-21st-century-a-proposal-for-universal-wireless-connectivity-and-improved-sound-quality
#3
Richard Einhorn
Approximately 360 million people in the world live with a debilitating hearing loss. The most common conditions-age-related and noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss-are both progressive and, for the foreseeable future, neither curable nor reversible.
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328493/a-balancing-act-scientists-seek-to-reduce-the-risk-of-falls-in-the-elderly
#4
Jennifer Berglund
It was the inaugural day of the study in 2005 when Brad Manor went out into the hot Louisiana sun to meet his first patient, a gentleman we'll call James. Manor, now director of the Mobility and Brain Function Lab at the Harvard-affiliated Institute for Aging Research, was, at that time, a Ph.D. student at Louisiana State University (Figure 1). James, a man in his early 70s, suffered from peripheral neuropathy, a condition that caused significant nerve damage in his legs and feet. James got out of his car, carrying his cane in his hand, and walked with Manor to the lab...
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328492/digital-tracking-of-cognitive-decline-researchers-are-co-opting-computers-in-their-efforts-to-detect-early-signs-of-dementia
#5
Michele Solis
Pinpointing where healthy brain aging leaves off and dementia begins is difficult. Is a slip in memory an expected outcome for a too-busy person or a warning of something else? If an empty-nester loses the motivation to cook, is it a sign that the person is enjoying retirement after a lifetime spent cooking or an early sign of a cognitive decline?
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328491/the-age-of-opportunity-european-efforts-seek-to-address-the-challenges-of-an-aging-population-and-also-create-opportunities-for-economic-growth-and-innovation
#6
Jim Banks
For the last ten years, Peter Wintlev-Jensen has been immersed in one of the greatest challenges the world will have to address in the decades ahead-the unprecedented aging of the population not only in Europe but also across the globe. This trend is reshaping consumer spending, challenging established economic models, driving the development of new industry and service sectors, and forcing a rethinking of key policy areas within health and social care. To quantify the challenge from a U.K. perspective, a recent report from the nonprofit organization Age UK showed that the country now has more people 60 or over than under 18 and more pensioners than children under 16...
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328490/the-coming-gray-tide-wanted-health-innovations-for-an-increasingly-older-population
#7
Leslie Mertz
The human population is getting older, and technology will play a key role in addressing the pressures this aging will place on healthcare systems. According to the 2015 United Nations' World Population Ageing report [1], the number of people worldwide 60 and older will increase from one in eight in 2015 to one in six by 2030 and to one in five by 2050; in Europe and "Northern America" (mainly the United States and Canada), those 60 and older will make up 25% of the population by 2030, and in Asia and Latin America, the number is predicted to be 17%...
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328489/correction
#8
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129142/bioengineering-and-cybernetics-a-modern-caduceus
#9
Richard L Magin
Like the caduceus, a medical symbol of entwined serpents, bioengineering and cybernetics have interwoven together ideas and concepts for over 50 years. Half a century is a long time, and whether we are talking about an academic discipline, our lives, or an old car, achieving 50 is a number that brings pause to the conversation. In books, wine, or collectibles, 50 years is termed vintage, which carries the connotation of depth and maturity. Certainly, in the case of the discipline of bioengineering, 50 years is a milestone of growth and development...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129141/wearable-devices-for-sports-new-integrated-technologies-allow-coaches-physicians-and-trainers-to-better-understand-the-physical-demands-of-athletes-in-real-time
#10
Dhruv R Seshadri, Colin Drummond, John Craker, James R Rowbottom, James E Voos
Elite-level athletes and professional sports teams are continually searching for opportunities to improve athletic performance and gain a competitive advantage on the field. Advances in technology have provided new avenues to maximize player health and safety. Over the last decade, time?motion analysis systems, such as video recording and computer digitization, have been used to measure human locomotion and improve sports performance. While these techniques were state of the art at the time, their usefulness is inhibited by the questionable validity of the acquired data, the labor-intensive nature of collecting data with manual hand-notation techniques, and their inability to track athlete position, movement, displacement, and velocity...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129140/committing-to-memory-memory-prosthetics-show-promise-in-helping-those-with-neurodegenerative-disorders
#11
Michele Solis
Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger-these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what's being called memory prosthetics. Once considered to be on the fringes of neuroscience, the idea of adding hardware to the brain to help with memory has gathered steam. In 2014, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made a US$30 million investment in memory prosthetic research as part of the Obama administration's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129139/turning-the-unknown-into-known-data-mining-is-increasingly-used-to-prospect-for-rare-disease-biology-and-treatments
#12
Leslie Mertz
Taken as a whole, rare diseases are not very rare. Even though a rare disease by definition is one that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans or fewer than one in 2,000 Europeans at any time, when rare diseases are considered together, they affect some 350 million people worldwide, or about 5% of the population (Figure 1). What is even more alarming is that 7,800 of the approximately 8,000 known rare diseases have no treatments available. It's not that rare diseases are harder to treat than more widespread illnesses...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129138/cancer-liquid-biopsy-is-it-ready-for-clinic
#13
Ying Pan, John S Ji, Jason Gang Jin, Winston Patrick Kuo, Hongjun Kang
The management of cancer relies on a combination of imaging and tissue biopsy for diagnosis, monitoring, and molecular classification-based patient stratification to ensure appropriate treatment. Conventional tissue biopsy harvests tumor samples with invasive procedures, which are often difficult for patients with advanced disease. Given the well-recognized intratumor genetic heterogeneity [1], the biopsy of small tumor fragments does not necessarily represent all the genetic aberrations in the tumor, but sampling the entire tumor in each patient is not realistic...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129137/tracking-disease-digital-epidemiology-offers-new-promise-in-predicting-outbreaks
#14
Mary Bates
On 19 October 2010, ten months after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti, the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) was notified of a sudden surge in patients suffering from watery diarrhea and dehydration. Two days later, the Haiti National Public Health Laboratory identified the culprit: Vibrio cholerae. On 22 October, officials announced the first cholera outbreak in Haiti in more than a century.
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129136/cancer-survivors-the-success-story-that-s-straining-health-care
#15
Summer E Allen
Since President Richard Nixon declared a "War on Cancer" in 1971, the number of cancer survivors in the United States has quadrupled [1] and is still rising. Thanks to advance in cancer detection and treatment, the almost 15 million cancer survivors in the United States today could grow to some 19 million by 2024 [2]. Increasing survival rates have resulted in a shift: cancer is often treated as a chronic illness rather than a death sentence. However, having so many cancer survivors to monitor, track, and treat has led to growing pains for healthcare providers-forcing them to develop new ways to treat this increasing yet still vulnerable population...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129135/tech-fights-toughest-tumors-new-robotics-capabilities-radiation-technologies-and-methods-for-spotting-tumor-cells-lead-the-way-forward
#16
Leslie Mertz
Ask any surgical oncologist, and you'll hear the same thing: tumors are insidious. Removing them completely can be very difficult. Sometimes tumors are in hardto-reach areas, and, in many cases, tumor tissue looks so much like normal tissue that surgeons cannot tell exactly what to excise and what to leave alone.
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129134/the-war-on-cancer-cold-spring-harbor-laboratory-is-fighting-the-good-fight
#17
Leslie Mertz
Located on the north shore of Long Island in New York, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (Figure 1) started out with a marine biology emphasis at the end of the 19th century, but it soon established itself as a prominent cancer research facility. That strong emphasis on cancer work continues today as this private, not-for-profit research institution enters its 127th year (Figure 2).
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875121/nikola-tesla-why-was-he-so-much-resisted-and-forgotten-retrospectroscope
#18
Max E Valentinuzzi, Martin Hill Ortiz, Daniel Cervantes, Ron S Leder
Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875120/new-frontiers-in-robotic-surgery-the-latest-high-tech-surgical-tools-allow-for-superhuman-sensing-and-more
#19
Michele Solis
Over the past 30 years, robots have become standard fixtures in operating rooms. During brain surgery, a NeuroMate robot may guide a neurosurgeon to a target within the pulsing cortex. In orthopedics, a Mako robot sculpts and drills bone during knee and hip replacement surgery. Dominating the general surgery field is the da Vinci robot, a multiarmed device that allows surgeons to conduct precise movements of tools through small incisions that they could not manage with their own hands.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875119/image-guided-interventions-we-ve-come-a-long-way-but-are-we-there
#20
Cristian A Linte, Ziv R Yaniv
While the term "image-guided surgery" has gained popularity fairly recently, the use of imaging for medical interventions dates as far back as the beginning of the 20th century. Dr. George H. Gray of Lynn, Massachusetts, reported in his 1908 article "X-rays in Surgical Work," published in volume 2 of the Journal of Therapeutics and Dietetics, that "the one great stride in the handling of difficult cases was the accurate diagnosis made possible by the use of the X-rays." His story points to the day when a seamstress presented to his office with a broken sewing needle embedded in her hand...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
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