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IEEE Pulse

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129142/bioengineering-and-cybernetics-a-modern-caduceus
#1
Richard L Magin
Like the caduceus, a medical symbol of entwined serpents, bioengineering and cybernetics have interwoven together ideas and concepts for over 50 years. Half a century is a long time, and whether we are talking about an academic discipline, our lives, or an old car, achieving 50 is a number that brings pause to the conversation. In books, wine, or collectibles, 50 years is termed vintage, which carries the connotation of depth and maturity. Certainly, in the case of the discipline of bioengineering, 50 years is a milestone of growth and development...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129141/wearable-devices-for-sports-new-integrated-technologies-allow-coaches-physicians-and-trainers-to-better-understand-the-physical-demands-of-athletes-in-real-time
#2
Dhruv R Seshadri, Colin Drummond, John Craker, James R Rowbottom, James E Voos
Elite-level athletes and professional sports teams are continually searching for opportunities to improve athletic performance and gain a competitive advantage on the field. Advances in technology have provided new avenues to maximize player health and safety. Over the last decade, time?motion analysis systems, such as video recording and computer digitization, have been used to measure human locomotion and improve sports performance. While these techniques were state of the art at the time, their usefulness is inhibited by the questionable validity of the acquired data, the labor-intensive nature of collecting data with manual hand-notation techniques, and their inability to track athlete position, movement, displacement, and velocity...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129140/committing-to-memory-memory-prosthetics-show-promise-in-helping-those-with-neurodegenerative-disorders
#3
Michele Solis
Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger-these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what's being called memory prosthetics. Once considered to be on the fringes of neuroscience, the idea of adding hardware to the brain to help with memory has gathered steam. In 2014, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made a US$30 million investment in memory prosthetic research as part of the Obama administration's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129139/turning-the-unknown-into-known-data-mining-is-increasingly-used-to-prospect-for-rare-disease-biology-and-treatments
#4
Leslie Mertz
Taken as a whole, rare diseases are not very rare. Even though a rare disease by definition is one that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans or fewer than one in 2,000 Europeans at any time, when rare diseases are considered together, they affect some 350 million people worldwide, or about 5% of the population (Figure 1). What is even more alarming is that 7,800 of the approximately 8,000 known rare diseases have no treatments available. It's not that rare diseases are harder to treat than more widespread illnesses...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129138/cancer-liquid-biopsy-is-it-ready-for-clinic
#5
Ying Pan, John S Ji, Jason Gang Jin, Winston Patrick Kuo, Hongjun Kang
The management of cancer relies on a combination of imaging and tissue biopsy for diagnosis, monitoring, and molecular classification-based patient stratification to ensure appropriate treatment. Conventional tissue biopsy harvests tumor samples with invasive procedures, which are often difficult for patients with advanced disease. Given the well-recognized intratumor genetic heterogeneity [1], the biopsy of small tumor fragments does not necessarily represent all the genetic aberrations in the tumor, but sampling the entire tumor in each patient is not realistic...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129137/tracking-disease-digital-epidemiology-offers-new-promise-in-predicting-outbreaks
#6
Mary Bates
On 19 October 2010, ten months after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti, the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) was notified of a sudden surge in patients suffering from watery diarrhea and dehydration. Two days later, the Haiti National Public Health Laboratory identified the culprit: Vibrio cholerae. On 22 October, officials announced the first cholera outbreak in Haiti in more than a century.
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129136/cancer-survivors-the-success-story-that-s-straining-health-care
#7
Summer E Allen
Since President Richard Nixon declared a "War on Cancer" in 1971, the number of cancer survivors in the United States has quadrupled [1] and is still rising. Thanks to advance in cancer detection and treatment, the almost 15 million cancer survivors in the United States today could grow to some 19 million by 2024 [2]. Increasing survival rates have resulted in a shift: cancer is often treated as a chronic illness rather than a death sentence. However, having so many cancer survivors to monitor, track, and treat has led to growing pains for healthcare providers-forcing them to develop new ways to treat this increasing yet still vulnerable population...
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129135/tech-fights-toughest-tumors-new-robotics-capabilities-radiation-technologies-and-methods-for-spotting-tumor-cells-lead-the-way-forward
#8
Leslie Mertz
Ask any surgical oncologist, and you'll hear the same thing: tumors are insidious. Removing them completely can be very difficult. Sometimes tumors are in hardto-reach areas, and, in many cases, tumor tissue looks so much like normal tissue that surgeons cannot tell exactly what to excise and what to leave alone.
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129134/the-war-on-cancer-cold-spring-harbor-laboratory-is-fighting-the-good-fight
#9
Leslie Mertz
Located on the north shore of Long Island in New York, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (Figure 1) started out with a marine biology emphasis at the end of the 19th century, but it soon established itself as a prominent cancer research facility. That strong emphasis on cancer work continues today as this private, not-for-profit research institution enters its 127th year (Figure 2).
January 2017: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875121/nikola-tesla-why-was-he-so-much-resisted-and-forgotten-retrospectroscope
#10
Max E Valentinuzzi, Martin Hill Ortiz, Daniel Cervantes, Ron S Leder
Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875120/new-frontiers-in-robotic-surgery-the-latest-high-tech-surgical-tools-allow-for-superhuman-sensing-and-more
#11
Michele Solis
Over the past 30 years, robots have become standard fixtures in operating rooms. During brain surgery, a NeuroMate robot may guide a neurosurgeon to a target within the pulsing cortex. In orthopedics, a Mako robot sculpts and drills bone during knee and hip replacement surgery. Dominating the general surgery field is the da Vinci robot, a multiarmed device that allows surgeons to conduct precise movements of tools through small incisions that they could not manage with their own hands.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875119/image-guided-interventions-we-ve-come-a-long-way-but-are-we-there
#12
Cristian A Linte, Ziv R Yaniv
While the term "image-guided surgery" has gained popularity fairly recently, the use of imaging for medical interventions dates as far back as the beginning of the 20th century. Dr. George H. Gray of Lynn, Massachusetts, reported in his 1908 article "X-rays in Surgical Work," published in volume 2 of the Journal of Therapeutics and Dietetics, that "the one great stride in the handling of difficult cases was the accurate diagnosis made possible by the use of the X-rays." His story points to the day when a seamstress presented to his office with a broken sewing needle embedded in her hand...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875118/women-s-health-is-personal-more-technologies-by-and-for-women-are-moving-into-the-mainstream-thanks-in-part-to-personalized-medicine
#13
Jennifer Berglund
One fall day in Boston, Ridhi Tariyal sat on an examination table in her primary care doctor's office. Her doctor sat across from her, hurriedly transcribing notes as Tariyal responded to the doctor's questions. It was the end of Tariyal's physical, and the waiting room was full. "Do you have any questions?" the doctor asked, not turning away from the computer screen.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875117/emotional-matters-innovative-software-brings-emotional-intelligence-to-our-digital-devices
#14
Ahmed Morsy
In 1872, Charles Darwin published The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, in which he argued that mammals show emotion reliably in their faces. Since then, thousands of studies have confirmed the robustness of Darwin's argument in many fields, including linguistics, semiotics, social psychology, and computer science. More interestingly, several studies, including those of renowned psychologist Paul Ekman, demonstrated that basic emotions are, indeed, universal. Affectiva, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology spinoff located in Waltham, Massachusetts, builds a variety of products that harness the two main characteristics of facial expressions-robustness and universality-to measure and analyze emotional responses...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875116/toward-a-comprehensive-cure-digital-information-and-communication-technology-is-helping-to-meet-health-care-challenges-in-india
#15
Debdoot Sheet
How would you provide effective and affordable health care in a country of more than 1.25 billion where there are only 0.7 physicians for every 1,000 people [1]? The Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP) and the Karnataka Internet-Assisted Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (KIDROP) service are two notable efforts designed to deliver care across India, in both urban and rural areas and from the country?s flat plains to its rugged mountainous and desert regions.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875115/target-malaria-has-a-killer-in-its-sights-eliminating-the-world-s-deadliest-disease-has-been-a-priority-for-decades-and-thanks-to-innovative-gene-drive-technology-target-malaria-is-getting-closer-to-achieving-that-goal
#16
Jim Banks
The mosquito is the deadliest animal in the world (Figure 1). It is the main carrier of parasites that cause malaria, which is a bigger killer than any other disease in history; in fact, some blame malaria for the deaths of half the humans who have ever lived. Today, malaria continues to have a devastating effect on the health of millions of people.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875114/technological-innovation-comes-to-palliative-care-with-a-shortage-of-palliative-specialists-telemedicine-and-remote-monitoring-offer-relief
#17
Mary Bates
At first, palliative care and technology might seem like strange bedfellows. At its core, palliative care is a very human side of medicine, relying heavily on talking with and listening to people to understand their experiences and goals. Technology, on the other hand, can often feel impersonal, cold, and one-size-fitsall. Despite this apparent disconnect, researchers and clinicians are finding new ways to harness technology to facilitate communication between patients and caregivers.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875113/mhealth-to-the-rescue-growing-use-of-wireless-and-mobile-technologies-improves-community-health-even-in-rural-areas
#18
Leslie Mertz
In rural areas, it is not unusual for patients to travel 50 miles or more to reach their doctors? offices or for doctors to refer patients to specialists whose offices are 80, 100, even 200-plus miles away. The sheer distance is a major obstacle for patients of all kinds: those who need urgent specialist care, those who have a chronic condition that requires regular visits, those who live in areas prone to poor weather-related driving conditions-really, anyone who has better things to do than spend hours traveling to and from a medical appointment...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875112/tying-tech-to-care-connected-health-is-better-for-both-providers-and-patients
#19
Leslie Mertz
People can do an incredible range of things remotely today. From a chair at the office or under an umbrella at the beach, they can adjust lights and appliance settings at home, monitor visitors on their doorstep, and check in on their teenagers? whereabouts. When it comes to health care, however, there?s still a long way to go before patients can get even simple care advice without having to make an appointment and trudge into the clinic or doctor's office.
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875111/improving-rural-health-how-system-level-innovation-and-policy-reform-can-enhance-health-outcomes-across-the-united-states
#20
Suhas Gondi, Kavita Patel
The United States is hailed as providing the most advanced health care the world has to offer. With cutting-edge medical devices, groundbreaking procedures, and innovative technologies, our hospitals and medical centers define what the global community sees as modern biomedicine. Engineers and clinicians continue to push and reshape this standard with new inventions enabled by a rapidly developing knowledge base. However, the fruit of this advancement has not benefited Americans equally. Millions still face significant obstacles to access health care, and our rural communities in particular have been left behind (see also "The Challenge of Rural Health Care")...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
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