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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811350/defining-the-dna-binding-site-recognized-by-the-fission-yeast-zn2cys6-transcription-factor-pho7-and-its-role-in-phosphate-homeostasis
#1
Beate Schwer, Ana M Sanchez, Angad Garg, Debashree Chatterjee, Stewart Shuman
Fission yeast phosphate homeostasis entails transcriptional induction of genes encoding phosphate-mobilizing proteins under conditions of phosphate starvation. Transcription factor Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the starvation response. The DNA binding sites in the promoters of phosphate-responsive genes have not been defined, nor have any structure-function relationships been established for the Pho7 protein. Here we narrow this knowledge gap by (i) delineating an autonomous DNA-binding domain (DBD) within Pho7 that includes the Zn2Cys6 module, (ii) deploying recombinant Pho7 DBD in DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to map the Pho7 recognition sites in the promoters of the phosphate-regulated pho1 and tgp1 genes to a 12-nucleotide sequence motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA], (iii) independently identifying the same motif as a Pho7 recognition element via in silico analysis of available genome-wide ChIP-seq data, (iv) affirming that mutations in the two Pho7 recognition sites in the pho1 promoter efface pho1 expression in vivo, and (v) establishing that the zinc-binding cysteines and a pair of conserved arginines in the DBD are essential for Pho7 activity in vivoIMPORTANCE Fungi respond to phosphate starvation by inducing the transcription of a set of phosphate acquisition genes that comprise a phosphate regulon...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811349/brain-macrophages-in-simian-immunodeficiency-virus-infected-antiretroviral-suppressed-macaques-a-functional-latent-reservoir
#2
Claudia R Avalos, Celina M Abreu, Suzanne E Queen, Ming Li, Sarah Price, Erin N Shirk, Elizabeth L Engle, Ellen Forsyth, Brandon T Bullock, Feilim Mac Gabhann, Stephen W Wietgrefe, Ashley T Haase, M Christine Zink, Joseph L Mankowski, Janice E Clements, Lucio Gama
A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cure requires an understanding of the cellular and anatomical sites harboring virus that contribute to viral rebound upon treatment interruption. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are reported in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Biomarkers for macrophage activation and neuronal damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-infected individuals demonstrate continued effects of HIV in brain and suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) may serve as a viral reservoir...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811348/a-critical-role-of-glutamine-and-asparagine-%C3%AE-nitrogen-in-nucleotide-biosynthesis-in-cancer-cells-hijacked-by-an-oncogenic-virus
#3
Ying Zhu, Tingting Li, Suzane Ramos da Silva, Jae-Jin Lee, Chun Lu, Hyungjin Eoh, Jae U Jung, Shou-Jiang Gao
While glutamine is a nonessential amino acid that can be synthesized from glucose, some cancer cells primarily depend on glutamine for their growth, proliferation, and survival. Numerous types of cancer also depend on asparagine for cell proliferation. The underlying mechanisms of the glutamine and asparagine requirement in cancer cells in different contexts remain unclear. In this study, we show that the oncogenic virus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) accelerates the glutamine metabolism of glucose-independent proliferation of cancer cells by upregulating the expression of numerous critical enzymes, including glutaminase 2 (GLS2), glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1), and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2), to support cell proliferation...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811347/tifa-signaling-in-gastric-epithelial-cells-initiates-the-cag-type-4-secretion-system-dependent-innate-immune-response-to-helicobacter-pylori-infection
#4
Alevtina Gall, Ryan G Gaudet, Scott D Gray-Owen, Nina R Salama
Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, causing inflammation which, in some cases, leads to gastric ulcers and cancer. The clinical outcome of infection depends on a complex interplay of bacterial, host genetic, and environmental factors. Although H. pylori is recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems, this rarely results in bacterial clearance. Gastric epithelial cells are the first line of defense against H. pylori and alert the immune system to bacterial presence...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811346/erratum-for-yin-et-al-novel-plasmid-mediated-colistin-resistance-gene-mcr-3-in-escherichia-coli
#5
Wenjuan Yin, Hui Li, Yingbo Shen, Zhihai Liu, Shaolin Wang, Zhangqi Shen, Rong Zhang, Timothy R Walsh, Jianzhong Shen, Yang Wang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811345/inhibitors-of-the-histone-methyltransferases-ezh2-1-induce-a-potent-antiviral-state-and-suppress-infection-by-diverse-viral-pathogens
#6
Jesse H Arbuckle, Paul J Gardina, David N Gordon, Heather D Hickman, Jonathan W Yewdell, Theodore C Pierson, Timothy G Myers, Thomas M Kristie
Epigenetic regulation is based on a network of complexes that modulate the chromatin character and structure of the genome to impact gene expression, cell fate, and development. Thus, epigenetic modulators represent novel therapeutic targets used to treat a range of diseases, including malignancies. Infectious pathogens such as herpesviruses are also regulated by cellular epigenetic machinery, and epigenetic therapeutics represent a novel approach used to control infection, persistence, and the resulting recurrent disease...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811344/the-capacity-of-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-to-survive-iron-starvation-might-enable-it-to-persist-in-iron-deprived-microenvironments-of-human-granulomas
#7
Krishna Kurthkoti, Hamel Amin, Mohlopheni J Marakalala, Saleena Ghanny, Selvakumar Subbian, Alexandra Sakatos, Jonathan Livny, Sarah M Fortune, Michael Berney, G Marcela Rodriguez
This study was conducted to investigate the role of iron deprivation in the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis We present evidence of iron restriction in human necrotic granulomas and demonstrate that under iron starvation M. tuberculosis persists, refractive to antibiotics and capable of restarting replication when iron is made available. Transcriptomics and metabolomic analyses indicated that the persistence of M. tuberculosis under iron starvation is dependent on strict control of endogenous Fe utilization and is associated with upregulation of pathogenicity and intrinsic antibiotic resistance determinants...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811343/comparative-genomics-of-escherichia-coli-isolated-from-skin-and-soft-tissue-and-other-extraintestinal-infections
#8
Amit Ranjan, Sabiha Shaik, Nishant Nandanwar, Arif Hussain, Sumeet K Tiwari, Torsten Semmler, Savita Jadhav, Lothar H Wieler, Munirul Alam, Rita R Colwell, Niyaz Ahmed
Escherichia coli, an intestinal Gram-negative bacterium, has been shown to be associated with a variety of diseases in addition to intestinal infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs), meningitis in neonates, septicemia, skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and colisepticemia. Thus, for nonintestinal infections, it is categorized as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). It is also an opportunistic pathogen, causing cross infections, notably as an agent of zoonotic diseases. However, comparative genomic data providing functional and genetic coordinates for ExPEC strains associated with these different types of infections have not proven conclusive...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811342/bacteriophages-of-gordonia-spp-display-a-spectrum-of-diversity-and-genetic-relationships
#9
Welkin H Pope, Travis N Mavrich, Rebecca A Garlena, Carlos A Guerrero-Bustamante, Deborah Jacobs-Sera, Matthew T Montgomery, Daniel A Russell, Marcie H Warner, Graham F Hatfull
The global bacteriophage population is large, dynamic, old, and highly diverse genetically. Many phages are tailed and contain double-stranded DNA, but these remain poorly characterized genomically. A collection of over 1,000 phages infecting Mycobacterium smegmatis reveals the diversity of phages of a common bacterial host, but their relationships to phages of phylogenetically proximal hosts are not known. Comparative sequence analysis of 79 phages isolated on Gordonia shows these also to be diverse and that the phages can be grouped into 14 clusters of related genomes, with an additional 14 phages that are "singletons" with no closely related genomes...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811341/the-u-s-culture-collection-network-responding-to-the-requirements-of-the-nagoya-protocol-on-access-and-benefit-sharing
#10
REVIEW
Kevin McCluskey, Katharine B Barker, Hazel A Barton, Kyria Boundy-Mills, Daniel R Brown, Jonathan A Coddington, Kevin Cook, Philippe Desmeth, David Geiser, Jessie A Glaeser, Stephanie Greene, Seogchan Kang, Michael W Lomas, Ulrich Melcher, Scott E Miller, David R Nobles, Kristina J Owens, Jerome H Reichman, Manuela da Silva, John Wertz, Cale Whitworth, David Smith
The U.S. Culture Collection Network held a meeting to share information about how culture collections are responding to the requirements of the recently enacted Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The meeting included representatives of many culture collections and other biological collections, the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Secretariat of the CBD, interested scientific societies, and collection groups, including Scientific Collections International and the Global Genome Biodiversity Network...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811340/type-iii-interferon-mediated-signaling-is-critical-for-controlling-live-attenuated-yellow-fever-virus-infection-in-vivo
#11
Florian Douam, Yentli E Soto Albrecht, Gabriela Hrebikova, Evita Sadimin, Christian Davidson, Sergei V Kotenko, Alexander Ploss
Yellow fever virus (YFV) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus, infecting ~200,000 people worldwide annually and causing about 30,000 deaths. The live attenuated vaccine strain, YFV-17D, has significantly contributed in controlling the global burden of yellow fever worldwide. However, the viral and host contributions to YFV-17D attenuation remain elusive. Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling and type II interferon (IFN-γ) signaling have been shown to be mutually supportive in controlling YFV-17D infection despite distinct mechanisms of action in viral infection...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811339/heritable-bovine-rumen-bacteria-are-phylogenetically-related-and-correlated-with-the-cow-s-capacity-to-harvest-energy-from-its-feed
#12
Goor Sasson, Sheerli Kruger Ben-Shabat, Eyal Seroussi, Adi Doron-Faigenboim, Naama Shterzer, Shamay Yaacoby, Margret E Berg Miller, Bryan A White, Eran Halperin, Itzhak Mizrahi
Ruminants sustain a long-lasting obligatory relationship with their rumen microbiome dating back 50 million years. In this unique host-microbiome relationship, the host's ability to digest its feed is completely dependent on its coevolved microbiome. This extraordinary alliance raises questions regarding the dependent relationship between ruminants' genetics and physiology and the rumen microbiome structure, composition, and metabolism. To elucidate this relationship, we examined the association of host genetics with the phylogenetic and functional composition of the rumen microbiome...
August 15, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790211/reply-to-drayman-observed-high-coinfection-rates-seem-to-be-a-result-of-overlapping-plaques
#13
Julie K Pfeiffer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790210/membrane-distribution-of-the-pseudomonas-quinolone-signal-modulates-outer-membrane-vesicle-production-in-pseudomonas%C3%A2-aeruginosa
#14
Catalina Florez, Julie E Raab, Adam C Cooke, Jeffrey W Schertzer
The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) is an important quorum-sensing molecule in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that also mediates its own packaging and transport by stimulating outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation. Because OMVs have been implicated in many virulence-associated behaviors, it is critical that we understand how they are formed. Our group proposed the bilayer-couple model for OMV biogenesis, where PQS intercalates into the outer membrane, causing expansion of the outer leaflet and consequently inducing curvature...
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790209/observed-high-coinfection-rates-seem-to-be-a-result-of-overlapping-plaques
#15
LETTER
Nir Drayman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790208/pathogenicity-locus-core-genome-and-accessory-gene-contributions-to-clostridium-difficile-virulence
#16
Brittany B Lewis, Rebecca A Carter, Lilan Ling, Ingrid Leiner, Ying Taur, Mini Kamboj, Erik R Dubberke, Joao Xavier, Eric G Pamer
Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that causes colitis in patients with disrupted colonic microbiota. While some individuals are asymptomatic C. difficile carriers, symptomatic disease ranges from mild diarrhea to potentially lethal toxic megacolon. The wide disease spectrum has been attributed to the infected host's age, underlying diseases, immune status, and microbiome composition. However, strain-specific differences in C. difficile virulence have also been implicated in determining colitis severity...
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790207/erratum-for-aidley-et-al-nonselective-bottlenecks-control-the-divergence-and-diversification-of-phase-variable-bacterial-populations
#17
Jack Aidley, Shweta Rajopadhye, Nwanekka M Akinyemi, Lea Lango-Scholey, Michael A Jones, Christopher D Bayliss
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790206/cellobiose-consumption-uncouples-extracellular-glucose-sensing-and-glucose-metabolism-in-saccharomyces-cerevisiae
#18
Kulika Chomvong, Daniel I Benjamin, Daniel K Nomura, Jamie H D Cate
Glycolysis is central to energy metabolism in most organisms and is highly regulated to enable optimal growth. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, feedback mechanisms that control flux through glycolysis span transcriptional control to metabolite levels in the cell. Using a cellobiose consumption pathway, we decoupled glucose sensing from carbon utilization, revealing new modular layers of control that induce ATP consumption to drive rapid carbon fermentation. Alterations of the beta subunit of phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK2), H(+)-plasma membrane ATPase (PMA1), and glucose sensors (SNF3 and RGT2) revealed the importance of coupling extracellular glucose sensing to manage ATP levels in the cell...
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790205/comparative-genomics-of-bacillus-thuringiensis-reveals-a-path-to-specialized-exploitation-of-multiple-invertebrate-hosts
#19
Jinshui Zheng, Qiuling Gao, Linlin Liu, Hualin Liu, Yueying Wang, Donghai Peng, Lifang Ruan, Ben Raymond, Ming Sun
Understanding the genetic basis of host shifts is a key genomic question for pathogen and parasite biology. The Bacillus cereus group, which encompasses Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis, contains pathogens that can infect insects, nematodes, and vertebrates. Since the target range of the essential virulence factors (Cry toxins) and many isolates is well known, this group presents a powerful system for investigating how pathogens can diversify and adapt to phylogenetically distant hosts. Specialization to exploit insects occurs at the level of the major clade and is associated with substantial changes in the core genome, and host switching between insect orders has occurred repeatedly within subclades...
August 8, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790204/bacterial-chromatin-structural-proteins-regulate-the-bimodal-expression-of-the-locus-of-enterocyte-effacement-lee-pathogenicity-island-in-enteropathogenic-escherichia-coli
#20
Hervé Leh, Ahmad Khodr, Marie-Christine Bouger, Bianca Sclavi, Sylvie Rimsky, Stéphanie Bury-Moné
In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) encodes a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) essential for pathogenesis. This pathogenicity island comprises five major operons (LEE1 to LEE5), with the LEE5 operon encoding T3SS effectors involved in the intimate adherence of bacteria to enterocytes. The first operon, LEE1, encodes Ler (LEE-encoded regulator), an H-NS (nucleoid structuring protein) paralog that alleviates the LEE H-NS silencing. We observed that the LEE5 and LEE1 promoters present a bimodal expression pattern, depending on environmental stimuli...
August 8, 2017: MBio
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