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Open Microbiology Journal

Angel Cid Arregui
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Arun K Mishra, Pragya Yadav, Amrita Mishra
The symptoms of Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) include blistering of skin on superficial layers due to the exfoliative toxins released from Staphylococcus aureus. After the acute exfoliation of skin surface, erythematous cellulitis occurs. The SSSS may be confined to few blisters localized to the infection site and spread to severe exfoliation affecting complete body. The specific antibodies to exotoxins and increased clearence of exotoxins decrease the frequency of SSSS in adults. Immediate medication with parenteral anti-staphylococcal antibiotics is mandatory...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Maria J Rodriguez-Mora, Virginia P Edgcomb, Craig Taylor, Mary I Scranton, Gordon T Taylor, Andrei Y Chistoserdov
Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Bernhard Resch, Renoldner B, Hofer N
OBJECTIVES: To identify laboratory and clinical characteristics of different pathogens associated with early-onset sepsis (EOS) of the newborn. METHODS: Newborns with EOS were retrospectively analyzed regarding laboratory and clinical parameters associated with the identified pathogen. RESULTS: We identified 125 newborns having diagnosis of culture proven EOS between 1993 and 2011. One hundred cases had diagnosis of group B streptococci (GBS) infection (80%), 11 had Escherichia coli (8...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Edwin D Morales-Álvarez, Claudia M Rivera-Hoyos, Patricia Landázuri, Raúl A Poutou-Piñales, Aura M Pedroza-Rodríguez
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II is a human recessive disease linked to the X chromosome caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme Iduronate 2-Sulfate Sulfatase (IDS), which leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in tissues and organs. The human enzyme has been expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris in attempt to develop more successful expression systems that allow the production of recombinant IDS for Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT). However, the preservation of native signal peptide in the sequence has caused conflicts in processing and recognition in the past, which led to problems in expression and enzyme activity...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Nyasha Chin'ombe, Boniface Muzividzi, Ellen Munemo, Pasipanodya Nziramasanga
BACKGROUND: Several nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) were previously isolated from diverse environments such as water, soil, sewage, food and animals. Some of these NTM are now known to be opportunistic pathogens of humans. OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of the study was to identify NTM isolates stored at the National Microbiology Reference Laboratory (NMRL) and were previously isolated from humans during a national tuberculosis (TB) survey. METHODS: Pure NTM cultures already isolated from human sputum samples during the national TB survey were retrieved from the NMRL and used for this study...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Nazanin Mohammad, Mehrnaz Taghipour Karsabet, Jafar Amani, Abolfazl Ardjmand, Mohsen Razavi Zadeh, Mohammad Khalifeh Gholi, Mahmood Saffari, Amir Ghasemi
Helicobacter pylori is a global health problem which has encouraged scientists to find new ways to diagnose, immunize and eradicate the H. pylori infection. In silico studies are a promising approach to design new chimeric antigen having the immunogenic potential of several antigens. In order to obtain such benefit in H. pylori vaccine study, a chimeric gene containing four fragments of FliD sequence (1-600 bp), UreB (327-334 bp),VacA (744-805 bp) and CagL(51-100 bp) which have a high density of B- and T-cell epitopes was designed...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Vassiliki Tsata, Aristea Velegraki, Anastasios Ioannidis, Cornelia Poulopoulou, Pantelis Bagos, Maria Magana, Stylianos Chatzipanagiotou
Commensals of the human body can shift to a pathogenic phase when the host immune system is impaired. This study aims to investigate the effect of seven yeast and two bacterial commensals and opportunistic pathogens isolated from blood and the female genital tract on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of human cervical epithelial cell cultures (HeLa). The pathogens Candida tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caused a significant decrease in TER as compared to the controls; Lactobacillus spp caused a significant increase in TER versus the controls and Escherichia coli had no effect on the TER of the cell monolayers...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Haifeng Chen, Yuan Hu
Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Xin-He Lai, Long-Fei Zhao, Xiao-Ming Chen, Yi Ren
Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Payam Fathi, Shaoguang Wu
Bacteroides fragilis is an extensively studied anaerobic bacterium comprising the normal flora of the human gut. B. fragilis is known to be one of the most commonly isolated species from clinical samples and has been shown to cause a wide range of pathologies in humans [1, 2]. As an opportunistic pathogen B. fragilis can cause abscess formation and bacteremia [2]. Additionally in its enterotoxigenic form, B. fragilis is a known cause of diarrheal illness, is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and has been recently characterized in patients with colon cancer [3 - 5]...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Ying Liu, Jiang Zhang, Yinduo Ji
Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that can cause a variety of infections, including superficial and systematic infections, in humans and animals. The persistent emergence of multidrug resistant S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus, has caused dramatically economic burden and concerns in the public health due to limited options of treatment of MRSA infections. In order to make a correct choice of treatment for physicians and understand the prevalence of MRSA, it is extremely critical to precisely and timely diagnose the pathogen that induces a specific infection of patients and to reveal the antibiotic resistant profile of the pathogen...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Lan Hu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Maryam Pourhajibagher, Farhad B Hashemi, Babak Pourakbari, Masoud Aziemzadeh, Abbas Bahador
Imipenem-resistant multi-drug resistant (IR-MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has been emerged as a morbidity successful nosocomial pathogen throughout the world.To address imipenem being yet the most effective antimicrobial agent against A. baumannii to control outbreaks and treat patients, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence of IR-MDR A. baumannii. We systematically searched Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and Iranian databases to identify studies addressing the antibiotic resistance of A...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Catrine Carlstein, Lillian Marie Søes, Jens Jørgen Christensen
Chorioamnionitis is a potentially life threatening infection of the fetal membranes, commonly caused by ascending bacteria from the vagina and cervix. In our case, a healthy nullipara with a term pregnancy presented clinical signs of infection after induced labour with an intracervical balloon. Thick green and foul smelling amniotic fluid was observed and culture showed massive growth of Aerococcus christensenii, a facultative anaerob species found in the human vagina, previously only rarely alleged to cause invasive infection...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Vitaly Smelov, Kurt Naber, Truls E Bjerklund Johansen
Some diseases of the urinary tract are defined by the presence of microorganisms while others are defined by their absence. The underlying idea has always been that urine from healthy subjects is sterile and a negative urine culture has usually been taken as discriminative for an infection to be absent. Several disorders with symptoms that resemble infections are regarded as separate entities based on the exclusion of bacterial growth such as overactive neurogenic bladder and pelvic pain syndromes. During the recent years two paradigmata related to the role of bacteria in urological disease classification have changed completely...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Moiz A Ansari, Zeeshan Fatima, Saif Hameed
Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Gabriella Piatti
Human adenoviruses are frequent cause of slight self-limiting infections in immune competent subjects, while causing life-threatening and disseminated diseases in immunocompromised patients, particularly in the subjects affected by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in bone marrow and organ transplant recipients. Here, infections interest lungs, liver, encephalon, heart, kidney and gastro enteric tract. To date, human adenoviruses comprise 51 serotypes grouped into seven species, among which species C especially possesses the capability to persist in infected tissues...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Cecilie Utke Rank, Peter Lommer Kristensen, Dennis Schrøder Hansen, Lisbet Brandi
Escherichia hermannii is an extremely rare etiological agent of invasive infection, and thus, the bacterium was initially considered non-pathogenic. However, in five previously reported case reports E. hermannii has been implicated as the sole pathogen. Our case report describes blood stream infection with E. hermannii in a haemodialysis patient with persisting symptoms, high fever and inflammatory markers despite appropriate antibiotic treatment until replacement of the dialysis catheter. We suspect biofilm formation to be a crucial pathogenic feature for E...
2016: Open Microbiology Journal
Kenneth Klingenberg Barfod, Katleen Vrankx, Hengameh Chloé Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Jitka Stilund Hansen, Karin Sørig Hougaard, Søren Thor Larsen, Arthur C Ouwenhand, Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin...
2015: Open Microbiology Journal
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