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Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28804452/supervised-and-unsupervised-learning-technology-in-the-study-of-rodent-behavior
#1
REVIEW
Katsiaryna V Gris, Jean-Philippe Coutu, Denis Gris
Quantifying behavior is a challenge for scientists studying neuroscience, ethology, psychology, pathology, etc. Until now, behavior was mostly considered as qualitative descriptions of postures or labor intensive counting of bouts of individual movements. Many prominent behavioral scientists conducted studies describing postures of mice and rats, depicting step by step eating, grooming, courting, and other behaviors. Automated video assessment technologies permit scientists to quantify daily behavioral patterns/routines, social interactions, and postural changes in an unbiased manner...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28804451/behavioral-changes-over-time-following-ayahuasca-exposure-in-zebrafish
#2
Robson Savoldi, Daniel Polari, Jaquelinne Pinheiro-da-Silva, Priscila F Silva, Bruno Lobao-Soares, Mauricio Yonamine, Fulvio A M Freire, Ana C Luchiari
The combined infusion of Banisteriopsis caapi stem and Psychotria viridis leaves, known as ayahuasca, has been used for centuries by indigenous tribes. The infusion is rich in N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, with properties similar to those of serotonin. Despite substantial progress in the development of new drugs to treat anxiety and depression, current treatments have several limitations. Alternative drugs, such as ayahuasca, may shed light on these disorders. Here, we present time-course behavioral changes induced by ayahuasca in zebrafish, as first step toward establishing an ideal concentration for pre-clinical evaluations...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790901/reversible-inactivation-of-the-higher-order-auditory-cortex-during-fear-memory-consolidation-prevents-memory-related-activity-in-the-basolateral-amygdala-during-remote-memory-retrieval
#3
Marco Cambiaghi, Annamaria Renna, Luisella Milano, Benedetto Sacchetti
Recent findings have shown that the auditory cortex, and specifically the higher order Te2 area, is necessary for the consolidation of long-term fearful memories and that it interacts with the amygdala during the retrieval of long-term fearful memories. Here, we tested whether the reversible blockade of Te2 during memory consolidation may affect the activity changes occurring in the amygdala during the retrieval of fearful memories. To address this issue, we blocked Te2 in a reversible manner during memory consolidation processes...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790900/maladaptive-decision-making-in-adults-with-a-history-of-adolescent-alcohol-use-in-a-preclinical-model-is-attributable-to-the-compromised-assignment-of-incentive-value-during-stimulus-reward-learning
#4
Lauren C Kruse, Abigail G Schindler, Rapheal G Williams, Sophia J Weber, Jeremy J Clark
According to recent WHO reports, alcohol remains the number one substance used and abused by adolescents, despite public health efforts to curb its use. Adolescence is a critical period of biological maturation where brain development, particularly the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, undergoes substantial remodeling. These circuits are implicated in complex decision making, incentive learning and reinforcement during substance use and abuse. An appealing theoretical approach has been to suggest that alcohol alters the normal development of these processes to promote deficits in reinforcement learning and decision making, which together make individuals vulnerable to developing substance use disorders in adulthood...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28785210/consequences-of-adolescent-exposure-to-the-cannabinoid-receptor-agonist-win55-212-2-on-working-memory-in-female-rats
#5
Erin K Kirschmann, Daniel M McCalley, Caitlyn M Edwards, Mary M Torregrossa
Marijuana is a prevalent illicit substance used by adolescents, and several studies have indicated that adolescent use can lead to long-term cognitive deficits including problems with attention and memory. However, preclinical animal studies that observe cognitive deficits after cannabinoid exposure during adolescence utilize experimenter administration of doses of cannabinoids that may exceed what an organism would choose to take, suggesting that contingency and dose are critical factors that need to be addressed in translational models of consequences of cannabinoid exposure...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28769774/fenofibrate-administration-reduces-alcohol-and-saccharin-intake-in-rats-possible-effects-at-peripheral-and-central-levels
#6
Mario Rivera-Meza, Daniel Muñoz, Erik Jerez, María E Quintanilla, Catalina Salinas-Luypaert, Katia Fernandez, Eduardo Karahanian
We have previously shown that the administration of fenofibrate to high-drinker UChB rats markedly reduces voluntary ethanol intake. Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist, which induces the proliferation of peroxisomes in the liver, leading to increases in catalase levels that result in acetaldehyde accumulation at aversive levels in the blood when animals consume ethanol. In these new studies, we aimed to investigate if the effect of fenofibrate on ethanol intake is produced exclusively in the liver (increasing catalase and systemic levels of acetaldehyde) or there might be additional effects at central level...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28769773/finding-home-landmark-ambiguity-in-human-navigation
#7
Simon Jetzschke, Marc O Ernst, Julia Froehlich, Norbert Boeddeker
Memories of places often include landmark cues, i.e., information provided by the spatial arrangement of distinct objects with respect to the target location. To study how humans combine landmark information for navigation, we conducted two experiments: To this end, participants were either provided with auditory landmarks while walking in a large sports hall or with visual landmarks while walking on a virtual-reality treadmill setup. We found that participants cannot reliably locate their home position due to ambiguities in the spatial arrangement when only one or two uniform landmarks provide cues with respect to the target...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28747875/effects-of-high-definition-anodal-transcranial-direct-current-stimulation-applied-simultaneously-to-both-primary-motor-cortices-on-bimanual-sensorimotor-performance
#8
Nils H Pixa, Fabian Steinberg, Michael Doppelmayr
Many daily activities, such as tying one's shoe laces, opening a jar of jam or performing a free throw in basketball, require the skillful coordinated use of both hands. Even though the non-invasive method of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been repeatedly shown to improve unimanual motor performance, little is known about its effects on bimanual motor performance. More knowledge about how tDCS may improve bimanual behavior would be relevant to motor recovery, e.g., in persons with bilateral impairment of hand function...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744207/preference-for-averageness-in-faces-does-not-generalize-to-non-human-primates
#9
Olivia B Tomeo, Leslie G Ungerleider, Ning Liu
Facial attractiveness is a long-standing topic of active study in both neuroscience and social science, motivated by its positive social consequences. Over the past few decades, it has been established that averageness is a major factor influencing judgments of facial attractiveness in humans. Non-human primates share similar social behaviors as well as neural mechanisms related to face processing with humans. However, it is unknown whether monkeys, like humans, also find particular faces attractive and, if so, which kind of facial traits they prefer...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744206/reward-draws-the-eye-uncertainty-holds-the-eye-associative-learning-modulates-distractor-interference-in-visual-search
#10
Stephan Koenig, Hanna Kadel, Metin Uengoer, Anna Schubö, Harald Lachnit
Stimuli in our sensory environment differ with respect to their physical salience but moreover may acquire motivational salience by association with reward. If we repeatedly observed that reward is available in the context of a particular cue but absent in the context of another cue the former typically attracts more attention than the latter. However, we also may encounter cues uncorrelated with reward. A cue with 50% reward contingency may induce an average reward expectancy but at the same time induces high reward uncertainty...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744205/comprehensive-behavioral-analysis-of-activating-transcription-factor-5-deficient-mice
#11
Mariko Umemura, Tae Ogura, Ayako Matsuzaki, Haruo Nakano, Keizo Takao, Tsuyoshi Miyakawa, Yuji Takahashi
Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the CREB/ATF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors. We previously reported that ATF5-deficient (ATF5(-/-)) mice demonstrated abnormal olfactory bulb development due to impaired interneuron supply. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice were less aggressive than ATF5(+/+) mice. Although ATF5 is widely expressed in the brain, and involved in the regulation of proliferation and development of neurons, the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain remains unknown...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28736518/behavioral-effects-of-systemic-infralimbic-and-prelimbic-injections-of-a-serotonin-5-ht2a-antagonist-in-carioca-high-and-low-conditioned-freezing-rats
#12
Laura A León, Vitor Castro-Gomes, Santiago Zárate-Guerrero, Karen Corredor, Antonio P Mello Cruz, Marcus L Brandão, Fernando P Cardenas, J Landeira-Fernandez
The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and 5-HT2A receptors in anxiety has been extensively studied, mostly without considering individual differences in trait anxiety. Our laboratory developed two lines of animals that are bred for high and low freezing responses to contextual cues that are previously associated with footshock (Carioca High-conditioned Freezing [CHF] and Carioca Low-conditioned Freezing [CLF]). The present study investigated whether ketanserin, a preferential 5-HT2A receptor blocker, exerts distinct anxiety-like profiles in these two lines of animals...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725189/inversion-reveals-perceptual-asymmetries-in-the-configural-processing-of-human-body
#13
Daniele Marzoli, Chiara Lucafò, Caterina Padulo, Giulia Prete, Laura Giacinto, Luca Tommasi
Ambiguous human bodies performing unimanual/unipedal actions are perceived more frequently as right-handed/footed rather than left-handed/footed, which suggests a perceptual and attentional bias toward the right side of others' body. A bias toward the right arm of human bodies could be adaptive in social life, most social interactions occurring with right-handed individuals, and the implicit knowledge that the dominant hand of humans is usually placed on their right side might also be included in body configural information...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725188/using-virtual-reality-to-assess-ethical-decisions-in-road-traffic-scenarios-applicability-of-value-of-life-based-models-and-influences-of-time-pressure
#14
Leon R Sütfeld, Richard Gast, Peter König, Gordon Pipa
Self-driving cars are posing a new challenge to our ethics. By using algorithms to make decisions in situations where harming humans is possible, probable, or even unavoidable, a self-driving car's ethical behavior comes pre-defined. Ad hoc decisions are made in milliseconds, but can be based on extensive research and debates. The same algorithms are also likely to be used in millions of cars at a time, increasing the impact of any inherent biases, and increasing the importance of getting it right. Previous research has shown that moral judgment and behavior are highly context-dependent, and comprehensive and nuanced models of the underlying cognitive processes are out of reach to date...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725187/lack-of-associations-between-female-hormone-levels-and-visuospatial-working-memory-divided-attention-and-cognitive-bias-across-two-consecutive-menstrual-cycles
#15
Brigitte Leeners, Tillmann H C Kruger, Kirsten Geraedts, Enrico Tronci, Toni Mancini, Fabian Ille, Marcel Egli, Susanna Röblitz, Lanja Saleh, Katharina Spanaus, Cordula Schippert, Yuangyuang Zhang, Michael P Hengartner
Background: Interpretation of observational studies on associations between prefrontal cognitive functioning and hormone levels across the female menstrual cycle is complicated due to small sample sizes and poor replicability. Methods: This observational multisite study comprised data of n = 88 menstruating women from Hannover, Germany, and Zurich, Switzerland, assessed during a first cycle and n = 68 re-assessed during a second cycle to rule out practice effects and false-positive chance findings. We assessed visuospatial working memory, attention, cognitive bias and hormone levels at four consecutive time-points across both cycles...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706477/response-commentary-the-brain-basis-for-misophonia
#16
COMMENT
Sukhbinder Kumar, Timothy D Griffiths
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706476/long-term-sex-dependent-vulnerability-to-metabolic-challenges-in-prenatally-stressed-rats
#17
Pamela Panetta, Alessandra Berry, Veronica Bellisario, Sara Capoccia, Carla Raggi, Alessia Luoni, Linda Longo, Marco A Riva, Francesca Cirulli
Prenatal stress (PNS) might affect the developmental programming of adult chronic diseases such as metabolic and mood disorders. The molecular mechanisms underlying such regulations may rely upon long-term changes in stress-responsive effectors such as Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) that can affect neuronal plasticity underlying mood disorders and may also play a role in metabolic regulation. Based upon previous data, we hypothesized that PNS might lead to greater vulnerability to an obesogenic challenge experienced at adulthood...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701932/functional-connectivity-differences-in-the-insular-sub-regions-in-migraine-without-aura-a-resting-state-functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging-study
#18
Zhi-Bo Yu, Yan-Bing Lv, Ling-Heng Song, Dai-Hong Liu, Xue-Ling Huang, Xin-Yue Hu, Zhi-Wei Zuo, Yao Wang, Qian Yang, Jing Peng, Zhen-Hua Zhou, Hai-Tao Li
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate resting-state functional connectivity (FC) differences in insular sub-regions during the interictal phase in patients with migraine without aura (MWoA). Methods: Forty-nine MWoA patients (MWoA group) and 48 healthy individuals (healthy control group) were recruited for this study. All of the subjects underwent neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI data were processed using Brat 1.0 software to obtain a whole-brain FC diagram and using Rest 1...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28694774/memory-performance-for-everyday-motivational-and-neutral-objects-is-dissociable-from-attention
#19
Judith Schomaker, Bianca C Wittmann
Episodic memory is typically better for items coupled with monetary reward or punishment during encoding. It is yet unclear whether memory is also enhanced for everyday objects with appetitive or aversive values learned through a lifetime of experience, and to what extent episodic memory enhancement for motivational and neutral items is attributable to attention. In a first experiment, we investigated attention to everyday motivational objects using eye-tracking during free-viewing and subsequently tested episodic memory using a remember/know procedure...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28690502/serotonin-5-httlpr-genotype-modulates-reactive-visual-scanning-of-social-and-non-social-affective-stimuli-in-young-children
#20
Antonios I Christou, Yvonne Wallis, Hayley Bair, Maurice Zeegers, Joseph P McCleery
Previous studies have documented the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms as genetic variants that are involved in serotonin availability and also associated with emotion regulation and facial emotion processing. In particular, neuroimaging and behavioral studies of healthy populations have produced evidence to suggest that carriers of the Short allele exhibit heightened neurophysiological and behavioral reactivity when processing aversive stimuli, particularly in brain regions involved in fear. However, an additional distinction has emerged in the field, which highlights particular types of fearful information, i...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
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