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Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience

Hang Xu, Yu Zhang, Fan Zhang, San-Na Yuan, Feng Shao, Weiwen Wang
Early stress is a significant risk factor for the onset of mood disorders such as depression during adulthood. Impairments in cognitive flexibility mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction are increasingly recognized as important etiological and pathological factors in the development of depression. Our previous study demonstrated that social defeat stress during early adolescence produced delayed deficits in cognitive flexibility in adult mice. The potential molecular mechanisms underlying these long-term consequences remain unclear...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Vibhuti Joshi, Ayeman Amanullah, Arun Upadhyay, Ribhav Mishra, Amit Kumar, Amit Mishra
Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old and abnormal proteins for normal cellular functions. Two significant protein quality control pathways inside the cellular milieu are ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Autophagy is known for bulk clearance of cytoplasmic aggregated proteins, whereas the specificity of protein degradation by UPS comes from E3 ubiquitin ligases. Few E3 ubiquitin ligases, like C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) not only take part in protein quality control pathways, but also plays a key regulatory role in other cellular processes like signaling, development, DNA damage repair, immunity and aging...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Tianda Chen, Qinwei Wu, Yang Zhang, Tianlan Lu, Weihua Yue, Dai Zhang
Background: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4) is found to be associated with schizophrenia. TCF4 mutations also cause Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe mental retardation. However, the function of TCF4 during brain development remains unclear. Results: Here, we report that Tcf4 is expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. In utero suppression of Tcf4 arrested neuronal migration, leading to accumulation of ectopic neurons in the intermediate zone. Knockdown of Tcf4 impaired leading process formation...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Marlen Thiere, Stefanie Kliche, Bettina Müller, Jan Teuber, Isabell Nold, Oliver Stork
Integrin-mediated cell adhesion and signaling is of critical importance for neuronal differentiation. Recent evidence suggests that an "inside-out" activation of β1-integrin, similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells, contributes to the growth and branching of dendrites. In this study, we investigated the role of the hematopoietic adaptor protein adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in these processes. We demonstrate the expression of ADAP in the developing and adult nervous hippocampus, and in outgrowing dendrites of primary hippocampal neurons...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Chen Gu
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Many believe autoimmune pathogenesis plays a key role in MS, but its target(s) remains elusive. A recent study detected autoantibodies against KIR4.1, an ATP-sensitive, inward rectifier potassium channel, in nearly half of the MS patients examined. KIR4.1 channels are expressed in astrocytes. Together with aquaporin 4 (AQP4) water channels, they regulate astrocytic functions vital for myelination. Autoantibodies against AQP4 have been established as a key biomarker for neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and contributed to diagnostic and treatment strategy adjustments...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Harvey B Pollard, Chittari Shivakumar, Joshua Starr, Ofer Eidelman, David M Jacobowitz, Clifton L Dalgard, Meera Srivastava, Matthew D Wilkerson, Murray B Stein, Robert J Ursano
"Soldier's Heart," is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks. We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Yan Zhang, Angelo Keramidas, Joseph W Lynch
Zn(2+) is concentrated into presynaptic vesicles at many central synapses and is released into the synaptic cleft by nerve terminal stimulation. There is strong evidence that synaptically released Zn(2+) modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission, although there is debate concerning the peak concentration it reaches in the synaptic cleft. Glycine receptors (GlyRs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord and brainstem, are potentiated by low nanomolar Zn(2+) and inhibited by micromolar Zn(2+)...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Rosario Gajardo-Gómez, Valeria C Labra, Juan A Orellana
Under physiological conditions, microglia adopt a resting phenotype associated with the production of anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic factors. In response to a wide variety of insults, these cells shift to an activated phenotype that is necessary for the proper restoration of brain homeostasis. However, when the intensity of a threat is relatively high, microglial activation worsens the progression of damage rather than providing protection, with potentially significant consequences for neuronal survival...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Weidong Le, Junjiao Wu, Yu Tang
Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). In the brains of patients with PD, microglia have both neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects, depending on their activation state. In this review, we focus on recent research demonstrating the neuroprotective role of microglia in PD. Accumulating evidence indicates that the protective mechanisms of microglia may result from their regulation of transrepression pathways via nuclear receptors, anti-inflammatory responses, neuron-microglia crosstalk, histone modification, and microRNA regulation...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Pekka Poutiainen, Merja Jaronen, Francisco J Quintana, Anna-Liisa Brownell
Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis to achieve successful treatment, as well as reveal underlying pathogenic mechanisms in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The cooperation of advanced multimodal imaging techniques and increased knowledge of the MS disease mechanism allows both monitoring of neuronal network and therapeutic outcome as well as the tools to discover novel therapeutic targets. Diverse imaging modalities provide reliable diagnostic and prognostic platforms to better achieve precision medicine...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Saskia M Leibowitz, Jun Yan
Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling pathways are involved in cell immune responses, apoptosis and infections. In multiple sclerosis (MS), NF-κB pathways are changed, leading to increased levels of NF-κB activation in cells. This may indicate a key role for NF-κB in MS pathogenesis. NF-κB signaling is complex, with many elements involved in its activation and regulation. Interestingly, current MS treatments are found to be directly or indirectly linked to NF-κB pathways and act to adjust the innate and adaptive immune system in patients...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Rameshwar K Sharma, Teresa Duda, Clint L Makino
This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Stephanie D Biergans, Charles Claudianos, Judith Reinhard, C G Galizia
The activity of the epigenetic writers DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) after olfactory reward conditioning is important for both stimulus-specific long-term memory (LTM) formation and extinction. It, however, remains unknown which components of memory formation Dnmts regulate (e.g., associative vs. non-associative) and in what context (e.g., varying training conditions). Here, we address these aspects in order to clarify the role of Dnmt-mediated DNA methylation in memory formation. We used a pharmacological Dnmt inhibitor and classical appetitive conditioning in the honeybee Apis mellifera, a well characterized model for classical conditioning...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Carine Jaafar, Saad Omais, Sawsan Al Lafi, Nadim El Jamal, Mohammad Noubani, Larissa Skaf, Noël Ghanem
The Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, was shown to regulate distinct aspects of neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain besides its primary role in cell cycle control. It is still unknown, however, whether Rb is required for tissue morphogenesis and the establishment of synaptic connections between adjacent tissues during development. We have investigated here the role of Rb during development of the olfactory system (OS), which heavily relies on reciprocal interactions between the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB)...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Zhen-Zhen Kou, Fa-Ping Wan, Yang Bai, Chun-Yu Li, Jia-Chen Hu, Guo-Tao Zhang, Ting Zhang, Tao Chen, Ya-Yun Wang, Hui Li, Yun-Qing Li
Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of the most common complications in the early stage of diabetes mellitus (DM). Endomorphin-2 (EM2) selectively activates the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and subsequently induces antinociceptive effects in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the effects of EM2-MOR in PDN have not yet been clarified in the spinal dorsal horn. Therefore, we aimed to explore the role of EM2-MOR in the pathogenesis of PDN. The main findings were the following: (1) streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycemia, body weight loss and mechanical allodynia; (2) in the spinal dorsal horn, the expression levels of EM2 and MOR decreased in diabetic rats; (3) EM2 protein concentrations decreased in the brain, lumbar spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in diabetic rats but were unchanged in the plasma; (4) the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was significantly higher in diabetic rats than in control rats; and (5) intrathecal injection of EM2 for 14 days in the early stage of PDN partially alleviated mechanical allodynia and reduced MOR expression in diabetic rats...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Serena Barral, Manju A Kurian
The study of neurological disorders often presents with significant challenges due to the inaccessibility of human neuronal cells for further investigation. Advances in cellular reprogramming techniques, have however provided a new source of human cells for laboratory-based research. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be robustly differentiated into specific neural subtypes, including dopaminergic, inhibitory GABAergic, motorneurons and cortical neurons. These neurons can then be utilized for in vitro studies to elucidate molecular causes underpinning neurological disease...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Yuan Zhang, Ting Wang, Ke Yang, Ji Xu, Lijie Ren, Weiping Li, Wenlan Liu
Enolase-phosphatase 1 (ENOPH1), a newly discovered enzyme of the methionine salvage pathway, is emerging as an important molecule regulating stress responses. In this study, we investigated the role of ENOPH1 in blood brain barrier (BBB) injury under ischemic conditions. Focal cerebral ischemia induced ENOPH1 mRNA and protein expression in ischemic hemispheric microvessels in rats. Exposure of cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3 cells) to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also induced ENOPH1 upregulation, which was accompanied by increased cell death and apoptosis reflected by increased 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide formation, lactate dehydrogenase release and TUNEL staining...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Horst A Obenhaus, Andrei Rozov, Ilaria Bertocchi, Wannan Tang, Joachim Kirsch, Heinrich Betz, Rolf Sprengel
The causal interrogation of neuronal networks involved in specific behaviors requires the spatially and temporally controlled modulation of neuronal activity. For long-term manipulation of neuronal activity, chemogenetic tools provide a reasonable alternative to short-term optogenetic approaches. Here we show that virus mediated gene transfer of the ivermectin (IVM) activated glycine receptor mutant GlyRα1 (AG) can be used for the selective and reversible silencing of specific neuronal networks in mice. In the striatum, dorsal hippocampus, and olfactory bulb, GlyRα1 (AG) promoted IVM dependent effects in representative behavioral assays...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Shiladitya Mitra, Ghantasala S Sameer Kumar, Vivek Tiwari, B Jyothi Lakshmi, Suman S Thakur, Satish Kumar
WDR13 expresses from the X chromosome and has a highly conserved coding sequence. There have been multiple associations of WDR13 with memory. However, its detailed function in context of brain and behavior remains unknown. We characterized the behavioral phenotype of 2 month old male mice lacking the homolog of WDR13 gene (Wdr13 (-/0)). Taking cue from analysis of its expression in the brain, we chose hippocampus for molecular studies to delineate its function. Wdr13 (-/0) mice spent less time in the central area of the open field test (OFT) and with the novel object in novel object recognition test (NOR) as compared to the wild-type...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Zhiwen Hong, Yujing Tian, Mengwen Qi, Yingchun Li, Yimei Du, Lei Chen, Wentao Liu, Ling Chen
The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (I GABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
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