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Western Journal of Emergency Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210370/immigrants-the-emergency-physician-and-the-election-day
#1
EDITORIAL
Bradley D Shy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210369/academic-primer-series-five-key-papers-for-consulting-clinician-educators
#2
Teresa M Chan, Michael Gottlieb, Antonia Quinn, Kory London, Lauren W Conlon, Felix Ankel
INTRODUCTION: Clinician educators are often asked to perform consultations for colleagues. Invitations to consult and advise others on local problems can help foster great collaborations between centers, and allows for an exchange of ideas between programs. In this article, the authors identify and summarize several key papers to assist emerging clinician educators with the consultation process. METHODS: A consensus-building process was used to generate a list of key papers that describe the importance and significance of educational consulting, informed by social media sources...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210368/academic-primer-series-five-key-papers-about-team-collaboration-relevant-to-emergency-medicine
#3
Michael Gottlieb, Catherine Grossman, Emily Rose, William Sanderson, Felix Ankel, Anand Swaminathan, Teresa M Chan
INTRODUCTION: Team collaboration is an essential for success both within academics and the clinical environment. Often, team collaboration is not explicitly taught during medical school or even residency, and must be learned during one's early career. In this article, we aim to summarize five key papers about team collaboration for early career clinician educators. METHODS: We conducted a consensus-building process among the writing team to generate a list of key papers that describe the importance or significance of team collaboration, seeking input from social media sources...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210367/academic-primer-series-eight-key-papers-about-education-theory
#4
Michael Gottlieb, Megan Boysen-Osborn, Teresa M Chan, Sara M Krzyzaniak, Nicolas Pineda, Jordan Spector, Jonathan Sherbino
INTRODUCTION: Many teachers adopt instructional methods based on assumptions of best practices without attention to or knowledge of supporting education theory. Familiarity with a variety of theories informs education that is efficient, strategic, and evidence-based. As part of the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Faculty Incubator Program, a list of key education theories for junior faculty was developed. METHODS: A list of key papers on theories relevant to medical education was generated using an expert panel, a virtual community of practice synthetic discussion, and a social media call for resources...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210366/blog-and-podcast-watch-cutaneous-emergencies
#5
Andrew Grock, Eric J Morley, Lynn Roppolo, Jay Khadpe, Felix Ankel, Michelle Lin
INTRODUCTION: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of cutaneous emergencies from the AIR series. METHODS: The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210365/who-are-the-most-influential-emergency-physicians-on-twitter
#6
Jeff Riddell, Alisha Brown, Ivor Kovic, Joshua Jauregui
INTRODUCTION: Twitter has recently gained popularity in emergency medicine (EM). Opinion leaders on Twitter have significant influence on the conversation and content, yet little is known about these opinion leaders. We aimed to describe a methodology to identify the most influential emergency physicians (EP) on Twitter and present a current list. METHODS: We analyzed 2,234 English-language EPs on Twitter from a previously published list of Twitter accounts generated by a snowball sampling technique...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210364/caudal-edge-of-the-liver-in-the-right-upper-quadrant-ruq-view-is-the-most-sensitive-area-for-free-fluid-on-the-fast-exam
#7
Viveta Lobo, Michelle Hunter-Behrend, Erin Cullnan, Rebecca Higbee, Caleb Phillips, Sarah Williams, Philips Perera, Laleh Gharahbaghian
INTRODUCTION: The focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) exam is a critical diagnostic test for intraperitoneal free fluid (FF). Current teaching is that fluid accumulates first in Morison's pouch. The goal of this study was to evaluate the "sub-quadrants" of traditional FAST views to determine the most sensitive areas for FF accumulation. METHODS: We analyzed a retrospective cohort of all adult trauma patients who had a recorded FAST exam by emergency physicians at a Level I trauma center from January 2012 - June 2013...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210363/using-the-electronic-medical-record-to-reduce-unnecessary-ordering-of-coagulation-studies-for-patients-with-chest-pain
#8
Jeremiah S Hinson, Binoy Mistry, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, Nicholas Risko, David Scordino, Karolina Paziana, Susan Peterson, Rodney Omron
INTRODUCTION: Our goal was to reduce ordering of coagulation studies in the emergency department (ED) that have no added value for patients presenting with chest pain. We hypothesized this could be achieved via implementation of a stopgap measure in the electronic medical record (EMR). METHODS: We used a pre and post quasi-experimental study design to evaluate the impact of an EMR-based intervention on coagulation study ordering for patients with chest pain. A simple interactive prompt was incorporated into the EMR of our ED that required clinicians to indicate whether patients were on anticoagulation therapy prior to completion of orders for coagulation studies...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210362/serum-lactate-predicts-adverse-outcomes-in-emergency-department-patients-with-and-without-infection
#9
Kimie Oedorf, Danielle E Day, Yotam Lior, Victor Novack, Leon D Sanchez, Richard E Wolfe, Hans Kirkegaard, Nathan I Shapiro, Daniel J Henning
INTRODUCTION: Lactate levels are increasingly used to risk stratify emergency department (ED) patients with and without infection. Whether a serum lactate provides similar prognostic value across diseases is not fully elucidated. This study assesses the prognostic value of serum lactate in ED patients with and without infection to both report and compare relative predictive value across etiologies. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational study of ED patients displaying abnormal vital signs (AVS) (heart rate ≥130 bpm, respiratory rate ≥24 bpm, shock index ≥1, and/or systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg)...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210361/estimating-the-cost-of-care-for-emergency-department-syncope-patients-comparison-of-three-models
#10
Marc A Probst, John K McConnell, Robert E Weiss, Amber L Laurie, Annick N Yagapen, Michelle P Lin, Jeffrey M Caterino, Manish N Shah, Benjamin C Sun
INTRODUCTION: We sought to compare three hospital cost-estimation models for patients undergoing evaluation for unexplained syncope using hospital cost data. Developing such a model would allow researchers to assess the value of novel clinical algorithms for syncope management. METHODS: We collected complete health services data, including disposition, testing, and length of stay (LOS), on 67 adult patients (age 60 years and older) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with syncope at a single hospital...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210360/management-of-sickle-cell-disease-super-utilizers
#11
EDITORIAL
Gary A Johnson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210359/intentional-recreational-abuse-of-quetiapine-compared-to-other-second-generation-antipsychotics
#12
Lauren Klein, Stacey Bangh, Jon B Cole
INTRODUCTION: Case reports and poison center data have demonstrated that the second-generation antipsychotic quetiapine is being obtained and used for recreational abuse. The purpose of this study was to describe the relative rates of single-substance abuse for different atypical antipsychotics and compare their demographic and clinical features. METHODS: We conducted a 10-year retrospective analysis of the National Poison Data System (NPDS) database (2003 - 2013)...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210358/american-association-for-emergency-psychiatry-task-force-on-medical-clearance-of-adults-part-i-introduction-review-and-evidence-based-guidelines
#13
REVIEW
Eric L Anderson, Kimberly Nordstrom, Michael P Wilson, Jennifer M Peltzer-Jones, Leslie Zun, Anthony Ng, Michael H Allen
INTRODUCTION: In the United States, the number of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) for a mental health concern is significant and expected to grow. The breadth of the medical evaluation of these patients is controversial. Attempts have been made to establish a standard evaluation for these patients, but to date no nationally accepted standards exist. A task force of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry, consisting of physicians from emergency medicine and psychiatry, and a psychologist was convened to form consensus recommendations on the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to EDs...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210357/a-survey-of-emergency-medicine-residents-use-of-educational-podcasts
#14
Jeff Riddell, Anand Swaminathan, Monica Lee, Abdiwahab Mohamed, Rob Rogers, Salim R Rezaie
INTRODUCTION: Emergency medicine (EM) educational podcasts have become increasingly popular. Residents spend a greater percentage of their time listening to podcasts than they do using other educational materials. Despite this popularity, research into podcasting in the EM context is sparse. We aimed to determine EM residents' consumption habits, optimal podcast preferences, and motivation for listening to EM podcasts. METHODS: We created a survey and emailed it to EM residents at all levels of training at 12 residencies across the United States from September 2015 to June 2016...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210356/twelve-years-since-importance-of-cross-cultural-competency-recognized-where-are-we-now
#15
Remi A Kessler, Wendy C Coates, Arjun Chanmugam
INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to analyze the content and volume of literature that has been written on cultural competency in emergency medicine (EM) since its educational imperative was first described by the Institute of Medicine in 2002. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive literature search through the PubMed portal in January 2015 to identify all articles and reviews that addressed cultural competency in EM. Articles were included in the review if cultural competency was described or if its impact on healthcare disparities or curriculum development was described...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210355/comments-on-emergency-medicine-resident-rotations-abroad-current-status-and-next-steps
#16
COMMENT
Gabrielle A Jacquet, Scott G Weiner, Janis P Tupesis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210354/community-paramedicine-911-alternative-destinations-are-a-patient-safety-issue
#17
EDITORIAL
Nick T Sawyer, John D Coburn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210353/prevalence-of-horizontal-violence-among-emergency-attending-physicians-residents-and-physician-assistants
#18
Nico B Volz, Ryan Fringer, Bradford Walters, Terry Kowalenko
INTRODUCTION: Horizontal violence (HV) is malicious behavior perpetrated by healthcare workers against each other. These include bullying, verbal or physical threats, purposeful disruptive behavior, and other malicious behaviors. This pilot study investigates the prevalence of HV among emergency department (ED) attending physicians, residents, and mid-level providers (MLPs). METHODS: We sent an electronic survey to emergency medicine attending physicians (n=67), residents (n=25), and MLPs (n=24) in three unique EDs within a single multi-hospital medical system...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210352/risk-of-skin-and-soft-tissue-infections-among-children-found-to-be-staphylococcus-aureus-mrsa-usa300-carriers
#19
Lilly Cheng Immergluck, Shabnam Jain, Susan M Ray, Robert Mayberry, Sarah Satola, Trisha Chan Parker, Keming Yuan, Anaam Mohammed, Robert C Jerris
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) carriage and infections and determine risk factors associated specifically with MRSA USA300. METHODS: We conducted a case control study in a pediatric emergency department. Nasal and axillary swabs were collected, and participants were interviewed for risk factors. The primary outcome was the proportion of S. aureus carriers among those presenting with and without a skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210351/cross-continuum-tool-is-associated-with-reduced-utilization-and-cost-for-frequent-high-need-users
#20
Lauran Hardin, Adam Kilian, Leslie Muller, Kevin Callison, Michael Olgren
INTRODUCTION: High-need, high-cost (HNHC) patients can over-use acute care services, a pattern of behavior associated with many poor outcomes that disproportionately contributes to increased U.S. healthcare cost. Our objective was to reduce healthcare cost and improve outcomes by optimizing the system of care. We targeted HNHC patients and identified root causes of frequent healthcare utilization. We developed a cross-continuum intervention process and a succinct tool called a Complex Care Map (CCM)© that addresses fragmentation in the system and links providers to a comprehensive individualized analysis of the patient story and causes for frequent access to health services...
February 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
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