journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Topics in Companion Animal Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968815/fluid-overload-in-small-animal-patients
#1
REVIEW
Elizabeth Thomovsky, Aimee Brooks, Paula Johnson
Fluid therapy is used daily by veterinary practitioners and is an essential part of treatment of many veterinary patients. However, as with all interventions, there is the potential for negative side effects resulting from fluid therapy. Fluid overload is a key side effect that has been increasingly recognized in human medicine as leading to significant negative sequelae. Evidence related to fluid overload in veterinary medicine is sparse but it is likely that the same types of negative sequelae are seen in our veterinary patients...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968814/practical-assessment-of-volume-status-in-daily-practice
#2
REVIEW
Paula Johnson
Fluid therapy is considered the cornerstone of treatment for patients suffering from various medical ailments particularly in emergency and critical care situations where hypovolemia commonly occurs. The ability to accurately assess a patient's volume status is critical to the decision making process when synthesizing and implementing a fluid therapy plan. Both extremes, over supplementation or not supplementing enough fluid can be detrimental to the patient. Precisely assessing a patient's blood volume without access to advanced often complicated equipment and monitoring devices is challenging...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968813/fluid-therapy-part-ii-introduction
#3
EDITORIAL
Kristen A Marshall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968812/owner-s-perception-for-detecting-feline-body-condition-based-on-questionnaire-and-scores
#4
Letícia Peron, Sheila C Rahal, Maíra S Castilho, Alessandra Melchert, Flávia G Vassalo, Luciane R Mesquita, Washington T Kano
To evaluate the owner׳s ability to identify body condition in cats, based on questionnaire and scores, as well as to obtain others׳ information about the cat and the owner that may be related to the body condition. Seventy-seven owned cats, aged above 11 months, were evaluated. Initially, information was obtained on age, sex, breed, and whether they had been neutered. Next, owners were asked to fill a questionnaire: the first section was about the cat׳s diet type, feeding regime, and activity level, and the second section was on the owners׳ diet, physical activity, and physical condition...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968811/a-review-of-central-venous-pressure-and-its-reliability-as-a-hemodynamic-monitoring-tool-in-veterinary-medicine
#5
REVIEW
Kristen M Hutchinson, Scott P Shaw
OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature regarding central venous pressure (CVP) in veterinary patients pertaining to placement (of central line), measurement, interpretation, use in veterinary medicine, limitations, and controversies in human medicine. ETIOLOGY: CVP use in human medicine is a widely debated topic, as numerous sources have shown poor correlation of CVP measurements to the volume status of a patient. Owing to the ease of placement and monitoring in veterinary medicine, CVP remains a widely used modality for evaluating the hemodynamic status of a patient...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968810/a-review-of-available-techniques-for-cardiac-output-monitoring
#6
REVIEW
Kristen Marshall, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson, Aimee Brooks
The main objective of fluid therapy is to increase cardiac output (CO). Large, rapidly administered volumes of fluids are the cornerstone of treating patients in shock to restore circulating volume and improve tissue perfusion. However, determining exactly how much fluid a given patient requires can be challenging. If enough fluid is not given, poor tissue perfusion can lead to ischemia, anaerobic metabolism, and ultimately cell and patient death. Conversely, increased morbidity and mortality associated with excessive intravenous fluid administration has been reported in the human literature in a wide variety of conditions...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968758/chronic-diarrhea-in-dogs-what-do-we-actually-know-about-it
#7
REVIEW
Elias Westermarck
There is a paucity of research based knowledge about chronic diarrhoea in dogs. In the literature no studies can be found that confirms that round worm, whip worm, hook worm or giardia cause chronic diarrhoea in dogs. For this reason, it is questionable to study endoparasites when clarifying the reason for chronic diarrhoea in dogs. No study confirms that clostridium-, campylobacter- or salmonella species cause chronic diarrhoea signs in dogs. There is no research-based information to-date that endoscopy would be helpful in the diagnosis of dogs with chronic diarrhoea or to monitor how the disease progresses...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968757/a-pilot-study-exploring-the-plasma-potassium-variation-in-dogs-undergoing-steroid-therapy-and-its-clinical-importance
#8
Marina Baltar, Alexandra Costa, L Miguel Carreira
In most situations in veterinary medicine, glucocorticoids are the drugs of choice used, that is, to reduce the inflammatory response or limit an inappropriate immune response. Their use in long-term therapy may cause side effects that may weaken the patient. The aim of the study was to evaluate possible variations in the plasma potassium concentrations and their clinical relevance in dogs undergoing steroid therapy with methylprednisolone in anti-inflammatory doses. The study used a sample of 21 dogs (n = 21) presented for consultation, with a clinical condition requiring a corticosteroid therapeutic protocol with an anti-inflammatory dose of methylprednisolone...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968756/palatability-and-clinical-effects-of-an-oral-recuperation-fluid-during-the-recovery-of-dogs-with-suspected-parvoviral-enteritis
#9
REVIEW
Reut Tenne, Lauren A Sullivan, Elena T Contreras, Francisco Olea-Popelka, David C Twedt, Jeffrey Fankhauser, Logan Mastrianna, Michael R Lappin
Dogs infected with canine parvovirus (CPV) can develop severe enteritis that requires supportive care until voluntary food and water consumption return. An oral recuperation fluid (ORF) may assist in the overall recovery from CPV. The hypotheses of the study were that dogs with naturally infected CPV would prefer the ORF to water and that dogs consuming the ORF would have a more rapid return to voluntary appetite and improved caloric intake during the initial recovery period compared with dogs consuming water...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968755/alternative-access-routes-for-fluid-resuscitation
#10
REVIEW
Tami Lind
Fluid resuscitation in small animals is important in emergency situations and is utilized by every veterinary practice. Peripherally inserted intravenous catheters are an effective way of giving fluids to a veterinary patient. If an intravenous catheter is not obtainable, there are multiple other ways to administer fluids to a patient including dorsal pedal catheters, intraosseous catheters, central venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, nasogastric tubes, nasoesophageal tubes and subcutaneous administration of fluids...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968754/natural-and-synthetic-colloids-in-veterinary-medicine
#11
REVIEW
Aimee Brooks, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson
This review article covers basic physiology underlying the clinical use of natural and artificial colloids as well as provide practice recommendations. It also touches on the recent scrutiny of these products in human medicine and how this may have an effect on their use in veterinary medicine.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968753/crystalloids-a-quick-reference-for-challenges-in-daily-practice
#12
REVIEW
Danielle Hundley, Aimee Brooks, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson
There are numerous types, routes, and strategies of intravenous crystalloid therapy in veterinary medicine. Understanding basics of physiology and underlying disease pathologies can play an essential role in determining fluid therapy choices. This article provides an overview of fluid compartment physiology, a review of crystalloid types, and indications and interactions associated with intravenous crystalloid use.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968752/fluid-therapy-introduction
#13
EDITORIAL
Kristen A Marshall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451047/point-of-care-measurement-of-lactate
#14
REVIEW
Francesca Miranda Di Mauro, Gretchen Lee Schoeffler
Lactate is generated as a consequence of anaerobic glycolysis by all tissues of the body. Increased l-lactate, the isoform produced by most mammals, reflects increased anaerobic metabolism secondary to tissue hypoperfusion or tissue hypoxia in most clinical situations, and is called type A lactic acidosis. The utility of lactate measurement and serial lactate monitoring in veterinary patients has been demonstrated in multiple studies. Blood lactate concentration is significantly elevated in many disease processes including septic peritonitis, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, Babesiosis, trauma, gastric dilation and volvulus, and intracranial disease...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451046/blood-gas-analyzers
#15
REVIEW
Anthony L Gonzalez, Lori S Waddell
Acid-base and respiratory disturbances are common in sick and hospitalized veterinary patients; therefore, blood gas analyzers have become integral diagnostic and monitoring tools. This article will discuss uses of blood gas analyzers, types of samples that can be used, sample collection methods, potential sources of error, and potential alternatives to blood gas analyzers and their limitations. It will also discuss the types of analyzers that are available, logistical considerations that should be taken into account when purchasing an analyzer, and the basic principles of how these analyzers work...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451045/point-of-care-glucose-and-ketone-monitoring
#16
REVIEW
Siew Kim Chong, Erica L Reineke
Early and rapid identification of hypo- and hyperglycemia as well as ketosis is essential for the practicing veterinarian as these conditions can be life threatening and require emergent treatment. Point-of-care testing for both glucose and ketone is available for clinical use and it is important for the veterinarian to understand the limitations and potential sources of error with these tests. This article discusses the devices used to monitor blood glucose including portable blood glucose meters, point-of-care blood gas analyzers and continuous glucose monitoring systems...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451044/point-of-care-assessment-of-coagulation
#17
REVIEW
Clare E Hyatt, Benjamin M Brainard
Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451043/quality-assurance-and-quality-control-in-point-of-care-testing
#18
REVIEW
Ashleigh W Newman, Erica Behling-Kelly
With advancements in the standard of care in veterinary medicine and instrument technology, performing in-house laboratory work on a variety of point-of-care instruments, ranging from glucometers to benchtop chemistry analyzers, has become increasingly commonplace. However, the ability of an instrument to perform a test does not guarantee that those results are accurate. Ensuring that your in-clinic laboratory is providing reliable data requires a comprehensive plan that encompasses both common sense practices aimed at preventing errors at each stage of the testing process, as well as standard operating procedures to validate and monitor analyzer performance...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451042/point-of-care-testing-in-small-animal-practice-opportunities-and-challenges
#19
EDITORIAL
Daniel J Fletcher
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27154598/melanocytic-ophthalmic-neoplasms-of-the-domestic-veterinary-species-a-review
#20
REVIEW
Annie L Wang, Thomas Kern
Melanocytic neoplasms in veterinary species occur in various ophthalmic locations including the eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, sclera, anterior and posterior uvea, and orbit. Histology usually provides the definitive diagnosis for melanocytic ocular neoplasias. The degree of tissue invasiveness and anaplastic cellular characteristics are more reliable indicators of biological behavior than is mitotic index in most ophthalmic melanocytic tumors. Melanocytic neoplasias of the eyelid are predominantly benign in canines and equines, though in felines, there is the potential for metastasis, especially if the conjunctiva is involved...
December 2015: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
journal
journal
41875
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"