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Topics in Companion Animal Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317617/companion-animal-owner-perceptions-knowledge-and-beliefs-regarding-pain-management-in-end-of-life-care
#1
Roschelle Heuberger, Michael Petty, Janice Huntingford
The senior companion animal is the fastest growing segment of the pet population. End-of-life care, quality of life, and pain management (PM) are extremely important to pet owners. Research into PM and end-of-life care is essential due to lack of information on owner knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. A survey was developed to gather information from owners. Surveys were developed using expert focus groups, and participants were recruited through social media. Survey validation employed emergent themes and grounded theory...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317616/review-of-166-gunshot-injury-cases-in-dogs
#2
Hrvoje Capak, Nika Brkljaca Bottegaro, Ana Manojlovic, Ozren Smolec, Drazen Vnuk
The study is aimed to establish predilection signalment and history data, and to investigate clinical findings and risk factors associated with a poor outcome in dogs with projectile injuries. A retrospective study was undertaken of 166 canine cases in which a projectile was found on radiograph in a university׳s diagnostic imaging center more than a 4-year period. The study included dogs with both apparent (obvious recent traumatic event) and incidental (traumatic event unknown to the owner) projectile injury...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317615/routine-screening-examinations-in-attendance-of-cats-with-obstructive-lower-urinary-tract-disease
#3
Amanda Marin Neri, Luiz Henrique de Araújo Machado, Priscylla Tatiana Chalfun Guimarães Okamoto, Maurício Gianfrancesco Filippi, Regina Kiomi Takahira, Alessandra Melchert, Maria Lúcia Gomes Lourenço
This study evaluates the clinical findings obtained in routine screening examinations in cats with obstructive feline lower urinary tract disease at the time of service. Twenty-six cats with urethral obstruction were assessed by physical examination, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, and laboratory tests. Cats with signs of obstruction less than 36 hours before the service were in a state of alert, with body temperature and heart rate higher compared with cats in lethargy and stupor, obstructed up to 36 hours...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317614/snap-tests-for-pancreatitis-in-dogs-and-cats-snap-canine-pancreatic-lipase-and-snap-feline-pancreatic-lipase
#4
REVIEW
Panagiotis G Xenoulis, Jörg M Steiner
A clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats can be challenging. Several diagnostic modalities have been evaluated over the years for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis, but most of these modalities have been shown to be of limited clinical use because of poor performance, limited availability, or because they are invasive, or all of these. Assays for the measurement of pancreatic lipase (PL) immunoreactivity [Specific canine PL (Spec cPL) in dogs and Specific feline PL (Spec fPL) in cats] were first developed approximately 15 years ago, and studies have shown that they are currently the serum tests of choice for the evaluation of canine and feline patients, respectively, suspected of having pancreatitis...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317613/retrospective-study-2009-2014-perineal-hernias-and-related-comorbidities-in-bitches
#5
Ayne Murata Hayashi, Sandra Aparecida Rosner, Thais Cristine Alves de Assumpção, Angelo João Stopiglia, Julia Maria Matera
Retrospective study based on data extracted from medical records of dogs diagnosed with perineal hernia between 2009 and 2014; medical records of bitches were selected for further analysis to determine the prevalence of perineal hernias in bitches and to investigate potential comorbidities. Perineal hernia was diagnosed in 182 dogs (174 males and 8 females; 96% and 4%, respectively). Surgical correction was performed in 6 bitches. Surgical procedures corresponded to internal obturator muscle transposition with or without polypropylene mesh reinforcement (n = 5) and semitendinosus muscle transposition flap (n = 1)...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317612/hormonal-electrolytic-and-electrocardiographic-evaluations-in-bitches-with-eutocia-and-dystocia
#6
Carla Regina Barbieri Simões, Flávia Gardilin Vassalo, Maria Lúcia Gomes Lourenço, Fabiana Ferreira de Souza, Eunice Oba, Mateus José Sudano, Nereu Carlos Prestes
The objective of the study was to assess clinical alterations, electrocardiographic, hematological, biochemical, hemogasometric, electrolytic, and hormone plasma concentrations in bitches with eutocia and dystocia. Overall, 28 bitches (dystocia, n = 22 and eutocia, n = 6) were assessed. The evaluations were performed at 2 time points, M1 (1 hour prepartum-eutocia group and cesarean or clinical intervention-dystocia group) and M2 (postpartum-eutocia or dystocia group and anesthetic recovery-dystocia group). The main clinical finding was the hypothermia (mean: 36...
December 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968815/fluid-overload-in-small-animal-patients
#7
REVIEW
Elizabeth Thomovsky, Aimee Brooks, Paula Johnson
Fluid therapy is used daily by veterinary practitioners and is an essential part of treatment of many veterinary patients. However, as with all interventions, there is the potential for negative side effects resulting from fluid therapy. Fluid overload is a key side effect that has been increasingly recognized in human medicine as leading to significant negative sequelae. Evidence related to fluid overload in veterinary medicine is sparse but it is likely that the same types of negative sequelae are seen in our veterinary patients...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968814/practical-assessment-of-volume-status-in-daily-practice
#8
REVIEW
Paula Johnson
Fluid therapy is considered the cornerstone of treatment for patients suffering from various medical ailments particularly in emergency and critical care situations where hypovolemia commonly occurs. The ability to accurately assess a patient's volume status is critical to the decision making process when synthesizing and implementing a fluid therapy plan. Both extremes, over supplementation or not supplementing enough fluid can be detrimental to the patient. Precisely assessing a patient's blood volume without access to advanced often complicated equipment and monitoring devices is challenging...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968813/fluid-therapy-part-ii-introduction
#9
EDITORIAL
Kristen A Marshall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968812/owner-s-perception-for-detecting-feline-body-condition-based-on-questionnaire-and-scores
#10
MULTICENTER STUDY
Letícia Peron, Sheila C Rahal, Maíra S Castilho, Alessandra Melchert, Flávia G Vassalo, Luciane R Mesquita, Washington T Kano
To evaluate the owner׳s ability to identify body condition in cats, based on questionnaire and scores, as well as to obtain others׳ information about the cat and the owner that may be related to the body condition. Seventy-seven owned cats, aged above 11 months, were evaluated. Initially, information was obtained on age, sex, breed, and whether they had been neutered. Next, owners were asked to fill a questionnaire: the first section was about the cat׳s diet type, feeding regime, and activity level, and the second section was on the owners׳ diet, physical activity, and physical condition...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968811/a-review-of-central-venous-pressure-and-its-reliability-as-a-hemodynamic-monitoring-tool-in-veterinary-medicine
#11
REVIEW
Kristen M Hutchinson, Scott P Shaw
OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature regarding central venous pressure (CVP) in veterinary patients pertaining to placement (of central line), measurement, interpretation, use in veterinary medicine, limitations, and controversies in human medicine. ETIOLOGY: CVP use in human medicine is a widely debated topic, as numerous sources have shown poor correlation of CVP measurements to the volume status of a patient. Owing to the ease of placement and monitoring in veterinary medicine, CVP remains a widely used modality for evaluating the hemodynamic status of a patient...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968810/a-review-of-available-techniques-for-cardiac-output-monitoring
#12
REVIEW
Kristen Marshall, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson, Aimee Brooks
The main objective of fluid therapy is to increase cardiac output (CO). Large, rapidly administered volumes of fluids are the cornerstone of treating patients in shock to restore circulating volume and improve tissue perfusion. However, determining exactly how much fluid a given patient requires can be challenging. If enough fluid is not given, poor tissue perfusion can lead to ischemia, anaerobic metabolism, and ultimately cell and patient death. Conversely, increased morbidity and mortality associated with excessive intravenous fluid administration has been reported in the human literature in a wide variety of conditions...
September 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968758/chronic-diarrhea-in-dogs-what-do-we-actually-know-about-it
#13
REVIEW
Elias Westermarck
There is a paucity of research based knowledge about chronic diarrhoea in dogs. In the literature no studies can be found that confirms that round worm, whip worm, hook worm or giardia cause chronic diarrhoea in dogs. For this reason, it is questionable to study endoparasites when clarifying the reason for chronic diarrhoea in dogs. No study confirms that clostridium-, campylobacter- or salmonella species cause chronic diarrhoea signs in dogs. There is no research-based information to-date that endoscopy would be helpful in the diagnosis of dogs with chronic diarrhoea or to monitor how the disease progresses...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968757/a-pilot-study-exploring-the-plasma-potassium-variation-in-dogs-undergoing-steroid-therapy-and-its-clinical-importance
#14
Marina Baltar, Alexandra Costa, L Miguel Carreira
In most situations in veterinary medicine, glucocorticoids are the drugs of choice used, that is, to reduce the inflammatory response or limit an inappropriate immune response. Their use in long-term therapy may cause side effects that may weaken the patient. The aim of the study was to evaluate possible variations in the plasma potassium concentrations and their clinical relevance in dogs undergoing steroid therapy with methylprednisolone in anti-inflammatory doses. The study used a sample of 21 dogs (n = 21) presented for consultation, with a clinical condition requiring a corticosteroid therapeutic protocol with an anti-inflammatory dose of methylprednisolone...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968756/palatability-and-clinical-effects-of-an-oral-recuperation-fluid-during-the-recovery-of-dogs-with-suspected-parvoviral-enteritis
#15
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Reut Tenne, Lauren A Sullivan, Elena T Contreras, Francisco Olea-Popelka, David C Twedt, Jeffrey Fankhauser, Logan Mastrianna, Michael R Lappin
Dogs infected with canine parvovirus (CPV) can develop severe enteritis that requires supportive care until voluntary food and water consumption return. An oral recuperation fluid (ORF) may assist in the overall recovery from CPV. The hypotheses of the study were that dogs with naturally infected CPV would prefer the ORF to water and that dogs consuming the ORF would have a more rapid return to voluntary appetite and improved caloric intake during the initial recovery period compared with dogs consuming water...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968755/alternative-access-routes-for-fluid-resuscitation
#16
REVIEW
Tami Lind
Fluid resuscitation in small animals is important in emergency situations and is utilized by every veterinary practice. Peripherally inserted intravenous catheters are an effective way of giving fluids to a veterinary patient. If an intravenous catheter is not obtainable, there are multiple other ways to administer fluids to a patient including dorsal pedal catheters, intraosseous catheters, central venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, nasogastric tubes, nasoesophageal tubes and subcutaneous administration of fluids...
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968754/natural-and-synthetic-colloids-in-veterinary-medicine
#17
REVIEW
Aimee Brooks, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson
This review article covers basic physiology underlying the clinical use of natural and artificial colloids as well as provide practice recommendations. It also touches on the recent scrutiny of these products in human medicine and how this may have an effect on their use in veterinary medicine.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968753/crystalloids-a-quick-reference-for-challenges-in-daily-practice
#18
REVIEW
Danielle Hundley, Aimee Brooks, Elizabeth Thomovsky, Paula Johnson
There are numerous types, routes, and strategies of intravenous crystalloid therapy in veterinary medicine. Understanding basics of physiology and underlying disease pathologies can play an essential role in determining fluid therapy choices. This article provides an overview of fluid compartment physiology, a review of crystalloid types, and indications and interactions associated with intravenous crystalloid use.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27968752/fluid-therapy-introduction
#19
EDITORIAL
Kristen A Marshall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27451047/point-of-care-measurement-of-lactate
#20
REVIEW
Francesca Miranda Di Mauro, Gretchen Lee Schoeffler
Lactate is generated as a consequence of anaerobic glycolysis by all tissues of the body. Increased l-lactate, the isoform produced by most mammals, reflects increased anaerobic metabolism secondary to tissue hypoperfusion or tissue hypoxia in most clinical situations, and is called type A lactic acidosis. The utility of lactate measurement and serial lactate monitoring in veterinary patients has been demonstrated in multiple studies. Blood lactate concentration is significantly elevated in many disease processes including septic peritonitis, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, Babesiosis, trauma, gastric dilation and volvulus, and intracranial disease...
March 2016: Topics in Companion Animal Medicine
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