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Seminars in Immunopathology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28900758/in-utero-development-of-memory-t-cells
#1
REVIEW
Dania Zhivaki, Richard Lo-Man
Pathogen-specific immune memory develops subsequent to primary exposure to antigen, mainly in the context of infection or vaccination to provide protection. Although a safe fetal life requires a tolerogenic environment in order to circumvent unnecessary inflammatory responses, it needs to be prepared in utero to face the microbial environment outside the womb. The possibility of immune memory generation in the fetus would help such transition providing protection in early life. This requires fetal T cell exposure to foreign antigens presented by dendritic cells...
September 12, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28900713/complement-activation-a-threat-to-pregnancy
#2
REVIEW
Guillermina Girardi
Pregnancy poses a challenge for the immune systems of placental mammals. As fetal tissues are semi-allogeneic and alloantibodies that commonly develop in the mother, the fetus and the placenta might be subject to complement-mediated immune attack with the potential risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Here, I describe how the use of animal models was pivotal in demonstrating that complement inhibition at the fetomaternal interface is essential for a successful pregnancy. Studies in animals also helped the identification of uncontrolled complement activation as a crucial effector in the pathogenesis of recurrent miscarriages, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, and preterm birth...
September 12, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28900700/auxiliary-activation-of-the-complement-system-and-its-importance-for-the-pathophysiology-of-clinical-conditions
#3
REVIEW
Markus Huber-Lang, Kristina N Ekdahl, Rebecca Wiegner, Karin Fromell, Bo Nilsson
Activation and regulation of the cascade systems of the blood (the complement system, the coagulation/contact activation/kallikrein system, and the fibrinolytic system) occurs via activation of zymogen molecules to specific active proteolytic enzymes. Despite the fact that the generated proteases are all present together in the blood, under physiological conditions, the activity of the generated proteases is controlled by endogenous protease inhibitors. Consequently, there is remarkable little crosstalk between the different systems in the fluid phase...
September 12, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894935/tissue-compartmentalization-of-t-cell-responses-during-early-life
#4
REVIEW
Kyra D Zens, Thomas Connors, Donna L Farber
The immune system in early life is tasked with transitioning from a relatively protected environment to one in which it encounters a wide variety of innocuous antigens and dangerous pathogens. The immaturity of the developing immune system, and particularly the distinct functionality of T lymphocytes in early life, has been implicated in increased susceptibility to infection. Previous work has demonstrated that immune responses in early life are skewed toward limited inflammation and atopy; however, there is mounting evidence that such responses are context- and tissue-dependent...
September 11, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894916/structural-and-functional-diversity-of-collectins-and-ficolins-and-their-relationship-to-disease
#5
REVIEW
Mark Howard, Conrad A Farrar, Steven H Sacks
Pattern recognition molecules are sensors for the innate immune system and trigger a number of pathophysiological functions after interaction with the corresponding ligands on microorganisms or altered mammalian cells. Of those pattern recognition molecules used by the complement system, collagen-like lectins (collectins) are an important subcomponent. Whereas the best known of these collectins, mannose-binding lectin, largely occurs as a circulating protein following production by hepatocytes, the most recently described collectins exhibit strong local biosynthesis...
September 11, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842749/complement-as-a-regulator-of-adaptive-immunity
#6
REVIEW
Justin Killick, Gregoire Morisse, Dirk Sieger, Anne L Astier
The complement system is an ancient and evolutionarily conserved effector system comprising in mammals over 50 circulating and membrane bound proteins. Complement has long been described as belonging to the innate immune system; however, a number of recent studies have demonstrated its key role in the modulation of the adaptive immune response. This review does not set out to be an exhaustive list of the numerous interactions of the many complement components with adaptive immunity; rather, we will focus more precisely on the role of some complement molecules in the regulation of antigen presenting cells, as well as on their direct effect on the activation of the core adaptive immune cells, B and T lymphocytes...
August 25, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808775/how-novel-structures-inform-understanding-of-complement-function
#7
REVIEW
Elena Goicoechea de Jorge, Hugo Yebenes, Marina Serna, Agustín Tortajada, Oscar Llorca, Santiago Rodríguez de Córdoba
During the last decade, the complement field has experienced outstanding advancements in the mechanistic understanding of how complement activators are recognized, what C3 activation means, how protein complexes like the C3 convertases and the membrane attack complex are assembled, and how positive and negative complement regulators perform their function. All of this has been made possible mostly because of the contributions of structural biology to the study of the complement components. The wealth of novel structural data has frequently provided support to previously held knowledge, but often has added alternative and unexpected insights into complement function...
August 14, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685270/tolerance-and-immunity-to-pathogens-in-early-life-insights-from-hbv-infection
#8
REVIEW
Michelle Hong, Antonio Bertoletti
Immunity is not static but varies with age. The immune system of a newborn infant is not "defective" or "immature." Rather, there are distinct features of innate and adaptive immunity from fetal life to adulthood, which may alter the susceptibility of newborn infants to infections compared to adults. Increased protection to certain infectious diseases during early life may benefit from a dampened immune response as a result of decreased immune pathology. This concept may offer an alternative interpretation of the different pathological manifestations clinically observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients during the natural history of infection...
July 6, 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28674818/cytokine-storms-in-infectious-diseases
#9
EDITORIAL
John R Teijaro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555385/cytokine-storm-and-sepsis-disease-pathogenesis
#10
REVIEW
Benjamin G Chousterman, Filip K Swirski, Georg F Weber
Infectious diseases are a leading cause of death worldwide. Sepsis is a severe clinical syndrome related to the host response to infection. The severity of infections is due to an activation cascade that will lead to an autoamplifying cytokine production: the cytokine storm. Cytokines are a broad category of relatively small proteins (<40 kDa) that are produced and released with the aim of cell signaling. Our understanding of the processes that trigger this tremendous amount of cytokine production has made dramatic progress over the last decades, but unfortunately, these findings could not translate yet into effective treatments; so far, all clinical trials targeting cytokine production or effects failed...
July 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555383/new-fronts-emerge-in-the-influenza-cytokine-storm
#11
REVIEW
Xi-Zhi J Guo, Paul G Thomas
Influenza virus is a significant pathogen in humans and animals with the ability to cause extensive morbidity and mortality. Exuberant immune responses induced following infection have been described as a "cytokine storm," associated with excessive levels of proinflammatory cytokines and widespread tissue damage. Recent studies have painted a more complex picture of cytokine networks and their contributions to clinical outcomes. While many cytokines clearly inflict immunopathology, others have non-pathological delimited roles in sending alarm signals, facilitating viral clearance, and promoting tissue repair, such as the IL-33-amphiregulin axis, which plays a key role in resolving some types of lung damage...
July 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451786/the-meteorology-of-cytokine-storms-and-the-clinical-usefulness-of-this-knowledge
#12
REVIEW
Ian A Clark, Bryce Vissel
The term cytokine storm has become a popular descriptor of the dramatic harmful consequences of the rapid release of polypeptide mediators, or cytokines, that generate inflammatory responses. This occurs throughout the body in both non-infectious and infectious disease states, including the central nervous system. In infectious disease it has become a useful concept through which to appreciate that most infectious disease is not caused directly by a pathogen, but by an overexuberant innate immune response by the host to its presence...
July 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401256/immune-mediated-cytokine-storm-and-its-role-in-severe-dengue
#13
REVIEW
Anon Srikiatkhachorn, Anuja Mathew, Alan L Rothman
Dengue remains one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases worldwide. Infection with one of the serologically related dengue viruses (DENVs) can lead to a wide range of clinical manifestations and severity. Severe dengue is characterized by plasma leakage and abnormal bleeding that can lead to shock and death. There is currently no specific treatment for severe dengue due to gaps in understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The transient period of vascular leakage is usually followed by a rapid recovery and is suggestive of the effects of short-lived biological mediators...
July 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639062/rheumatoid-arthritis-from-basic-findings-and-clinical-manifestations-to-future-therapies
#14
EDITORIAL
Paul Hasler, Cem Gabay
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597065/cellular-and-molecular-pathways-of-structural-damage-in-rheumatoid-arthritis
#15
REVIEW
Ulrike Harre, Georg Schett
Structural damage of cartilage and bone tissue is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The resulting joint destruction constitutes one of the major disease consequences for patients and creates a significant burden for the society. The main cells executing bone and cartilage degradation are osteoclasts and fibroblast-like synoviocytes, respectively. The function of both cell types is heavily influenced by the immune system. In the last decades, research has identified several mediators of structural damage, ranging from infiltrating immune cells and inflammatory cytokines to autoantibodies...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555384/genetics-of-rheumatoid-arthritis-susceptibility-severity-and-treatment-response
#16
REVIEW
Sebastien Viatte, Anne Barton
A decade after the first genome-wide association study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a plethora of genetic association studies have been published on RA and its clinical or serological subtypes. We review the major milestones in the study of the genetic architecture of RA susceptibility, severity, and response to treatment. We set the scientific context necessary for non-geneticists to understand the potential clinical applications of human genetics and its significance for a stratified approach to the management of RA in the future...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508153/cellular-and-molecular-perspectives-in-rheumatoid-arthritis
#17
REVIEW
Douglas J Veale, Carl Orr, Ursula Fearon
Synovial immunopathology in rheumatoid arthritis is complex involving both resident and infiltrating cells. The synovial tissue undergoes significant neovascularization, facilitating an influx of lymphocytes and monocytes that transform a typically acellular loose areolar membrane into an invasive tumour-like pannus. The microvasculature proliferates to form straight regularly-branching vessels; however, they are highly dysfunctional resulting in reduced oxygen supply and a hypoxic microenvironment. Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are found at an early stage, often before arthritis has developed, and they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497350/synovial-cellular-and-molecular-markers-in-rheumatoid-arthritis
#18
REVIEW
M Asif Amin, David A Fox, Jeffrey H Ruth
The profound alterations in the structure, cellular composition, and function of synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are the basis for the persistent inflammation and cumulative joint destruction that are hallmarks of this disease. In RA, the synovium develops characteristics of a tertiary lymphoid organ, with extensive infiltration of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Concurrently, the fibroblast-like synoviocytes undergo massive hyperplasia and acquire a tissue-invasive phenotype. In this review, we summarize key components of these processes, focusing on recently-described roles of selected molecular markers of these cellular components of RA synovitis...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28455580/cardiovascular-risk-in-patients-with-rheumatoid-arthritis
#19
REVIEW
Kim Lauper, Cem Gabay
Substantial epidemiologic data have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Traditional CV risk factors may partly contribute to CV disease in RA; however, current evidence underlines the important role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and amplification of CV risk. Interplays between inflammation and lipid metabolism in the development of atherosclerosis have been established by recent scientific advances. Atherosclerosis is currently viewed as an inflammatory disease, and modifications of lipoproteins during inflammation accelerate atherogenesis...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451788/the-role-of-autoantibodies-in-the-pathophysiology-of-rheumatoid-arthritis
#20
REVIEW
V F A M Derksen, T W J Huizinga, D van der Woude
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation. The presence of autoantibodies in the sera of RA patients has provided many clues to the underlying disease pathophysiology. Based on the presence of several autoantibodies like rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP), and more recently anti-acetylated protein antibodies RA can be subdivided into seropositive and seronegative disease. The formation of these autoantibodies is associated with both genetic and environmental risk factors for RA, like specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and smoking...
June 2017: Seminars in Immunopathology
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