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Developmental Neurobiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188699/maturation-dependent-control-of-vocal-temporal-plasticity-in-a-songbird
#1
Ryosuke O Tachibana, Miki Takahasi, Neal A Hessler, Kazuo Okanoya
Birdsong is a unique model to address learning mechanisms of the timing control of sequential behaviors, with characteristic temporal structures consisting of serial sequences of brief vocal elements (syllables) and silent intervals (gaps). Understanding the neural mechanisms for plasticity of such sequential behavior should be aided by characterization of its developmental changes. Here, we assessed the level of acute vocal plasticity between young and adult Bengalese finches, and also quantified developmental change in variability of temporal structure...
February 11, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188695/electrical-transmission-two-structures-same-functions
#2
EDITORIAL
Alberto E Pereda, Eduardo Macagno
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 11, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188691/zebrafish-transgenic-constructs-label-specific-neurons-in-xenopus-laevis-spinal-cord-and-identify-frog-v0v-spinal-neurons
#3
José L Juárez-Morales, Reyna I Martinez-De Luna, Michael E Zuber, Alan Roberts, Katharine E Lewis
A correctly functioning spinal cord is crucial for locomotion and communication between body and brain but there are fundamental gaps in our knowledge of how spinal neuronal circuitry is established and functions. To understand the genetic program that regulates specification and functions of this circuitry, we need to connect neuronal molecular phenotypes with physiological analyses. Studies using Xenopus laevis tadpoles have increased our understanding of spinal cord neuronal physiology and function, particularly in locomotor circuitry...
February 11, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28170164/perineuronal-nets-and-vocal-plasticity-in-songbirds-a-proposed-mechanism-to-explain-the-difference-between-closed-ended-and-open-ended-learning
#4
Gilles Cornez, Farrah N Madison, Annemie Van der Linden, Charlotte Cornil, Kathleen M Yoder, Gregory F Ball, Jacques Balthazart
Perineuronal nets (PNN) are aggregations of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans surrounding the soma and proximal processes of neurons, mostly GABAergic interneurons expressing parvalbumin. They limit the plasticity of their afferent synaptic connections. In zebra finches PNN develop in an experience-dependent manner in the song control nuclei HVC and RA (nucleus robustus arcopallialis) when young birds crystallize their song. Because songbird species that are open-ended learners tend to recapitulate each year the different phases of song learning until their song crystallizes at the beginning of the breeding season, we tested whether seasonal changes in PNN expression would be found in the song control nuclei of a seasonally breeding species such as the European starling...
February 7, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28170151/the-electrical-synapse-molecular-complexities-at-the-gap-and-beyond
#5
REVIEW
Adam C Miller, Alberto E Pereda
Gap junctions underlie electrical synaptic transmission between neurons. Generally perceived as simple intercellular channels, "electrical synapses" have demonstrated to be more functionally sophisticated and structurally complex than initially anticipated. Electrical synapses represent an assembly of multiple molecules, consisting of channels, adhesion complexes, scaffolds, regulatory machinery, and trafficking proteins, all required for their proper function and plasticity. Additionally, while electrical synapses are often viewed as strictly symmetric structures, emerging evidence has shown that some components forming electrical synapses can be differentially distributed at each side of the junction...
February 7, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033684/cellular-reactions-and-compensatory-tissue-re-organization-during-spontaneous-recovery-after-spinal-cord-injury-in-neonatal-mice
#6
Rishab S Chawla, Mark Züchner, Maria Mastrangelopoulou, François M Lambert, Joel C Glover, Jean-Luc Boulland
Following incomplete spinal cord injuries, neonatal mammals display a remarkable degree of behavioral recovery. Previously, we have demonstrated in neonatal mice a wholesale re-establishment and reorganization of synaptic connections from some descending axon tracts (Boulland et al., 2013). To assess the potential cellular mechanisms contributing to this recovery, we have here characterized a variety of cellular sequelae following thoracic compression injuries, focusing particularly on cell loss and proliferation, inflammation and reactive gliosis, and the dynamics of specific types of synaptic terminals...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033683/snare-proteins-play-a-role-in-motor-axon-guidance-in-vertebrates-and-invertebrates
#7
Pablo José Barrecheguren, Oriol Ros, Tiziana Cotrufo, Beat Kunz, Eduardo Soriano, Fausto Ulloa, Esther T Stoeckli, Sofia J Araújo
Axonal growth and guidance rely on correct growth cone responses to guidance cues, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the periphery. Unlike the signaling cascades that link axonal growth to cytoskeletal dynamics, little is known about the crosstalk mechanisms between guidance and membrane dynamics and turnover in the axon. Our studies have shown that Netrin-1/Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) signaling triggers exocytosis through the SNARE Syntaxin-1 (STX-1) during the formation of commissural pathways...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033671/visual-experience-dependent-regulation-of-neuronal-structure-and-function-by-histone-deacetylase-1-in-developing-xenopus-tectum-in-vivo
#8
Hangze Ruan, Juanmei Gao, Xianjie Qi, Yi Tao, Xia Guo, Zhaoyi Guo, Lijun Zheng, Yaling Song, Yuan Liao, Wanhua Shen
Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) is thought to play pivotal roles in neurogenesis and neurodegeneration. However, the role of HDAC1 in neuronal growth and structural plasticity in the developing brain in vivo remains unclear. Here, we show that in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis, HDAC1 knockdown dramatically decreased the frequency of AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents and increased the frequency of GABAAR-mediated currents, whereas HDAC1 overexpression significantly decreased the frequency of GABAAR-mediated synaptic currents...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033654/rat-astrocytes-are-more-supportive-for-mouse-opc-self-renewal-than-mouse-astrocytes-in-culture
#9
Xuejun Cheng, Binghua Xie, Jiajun Qi, Xiaofeng Zhao, Zunyi Zhang, Mengsheng Qiu, Junlin Yang
Mouse primary OPCs are increasingly used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype changes in oligodendrocyte differentiation and axonal myelination observed in transgenic or mutant mouse models. However, mouse OPCs are much more difficult to be isolated by the simple dissociation culture of brain tissues than their rat counterparts. To date, the mechanisms underlying the species difference in OPC preparation remain obscure. In this study, we showed that astrocytes from rats have a stronger effect than those from mouse in promoting OPC proliferation and survival in vitro...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033651/axons-get-ahead-insights-into-axon-guidance-and-congenital-cranial-dysinnervation-disorders
#10
REVIEW
John K Chilton, Sarah Guthrie
Cranial nerves innervate head muscles in a well-characterised and highly conserved pattern. Identification of genes responsible for human congenital disorders of these nerves, combined with the analysis of their role in axonal development in animal models has advanced understanding of how neuromuscular connectivity is established. Here we focus on the ocular motor system, as an instructive example of the success of this approach in unravelling the aetiology of human strabismus. The discovery that ocular motility disorders can arise from mutations in transcription factors, including HoxA1, HoxB1, MafB, Phox2A and Sall4, has revealed gene regulatory networks that pattern the brainstem and/or govern the differentiation of cranial motor neurons...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033646/the-robo3-receptor-a-key-player-in-the-development-evolution-and-function-of-commissural-systems
#11
REVIEW
François Friocourt, Alain Chédotal
Roundabout receptors are known to mediate Slit-dependent repulsive signaling. However in vertebrates, mounting evidence suggest that Robo3 is an unconventional Robo receptor regarding both its expression and function. From its initial description, Robo3 receptor has been tightly associated with the development of specific axons, called commissural, that connect both sides of the nervous system. Many studies using transgenic mouse models showed that Robo3 expression is mandatory for commissural axon guidance to the floor plate...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27935269/from-adolescent-to-elder-rats-motivation-for-palatable-food-and-cannabinoids-receptors
#12
Amancio-Belmont Octavio, Romano-López Antonio, Ruiz-Contreras Alejandra Evelin, Méndez-Díaz Mónica, Prospéro-García Oscar
To analyze motivation, food self-administration and decision-making were evaluated in adolescent, adult, and aged rats. Subjects were trained to press a lever (fixed ratio, FR1 and FR5) in an operant chamber, to obtain chocolate flavor pellets. They assessed the progressive ratio (PR), extinction, and reinstatement of the behavior. To estimate decision-making for food, rats were trained in the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm: (a) associating one compartment with lab chow (LCh) one day and the other compartment with rice krisspies (RK), the next day...
December 9, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907267/mitogenic-action-of-hypoxia-upon-cutaneous-neuroepithelial-cells-in-developing-zebrafish
#13
Benjamin W Dean, Thalia J Rashid, Michael G Jonz
In zebrafish, cutaneous neuroepithelial cells (NECs) contain serotonin (5-HT) and are believed to initiate physiological and behavioral responses to hypoxia during embryonic and early larval development, when mature gills and O2 chemoreceptors are not yet present. The number of skin NECs rapidly declines as embryos develop into larvae, but acclimation to hypoxia leads to retention of a greater number of these cells. We hypothesized that reduction of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) in water would stimulate mitosis in cutaneous NECs in zebrafish...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907266/retinal-axon-guidance-at-the-midline-chiasmatic-misrouting-and-consequences
#14
REVIEW
Delphine S Prieur, Alexandra Rebsam
The visual representation of the outside world relies on the appropriate connectivity between the eyes and the brain. Retinal ganglion cells are the sole neurons that send an axon from the retina to the brain, and thus the guidance decisions of retinal axons en route to their targets in the brain shape the neural circuitry that forms the basis of vision. Here, we focus on the choice made by retinal axons to cross or avoid the midline at the optic chiasm. This decision allows each brain hemisphere to receive inputs from both eyes corresponding to the same visual hemifield, and is thus crucial for binocular vision...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907249/grainyhead-like-3-grhl3-deficiency-in-brain-leads-to-altered-locomotor-activity-and-decreased-anxiety-like-behaviours-in-aged-mice
#15
Sebastian Dworkin, Alana Auden, Darren D Partridge, Maria Daglas, Robert L Medcalf, Theo Mantamadiotis, Smitha R Georgy, Charbel Darido, Stephen M Jane, Stephen B Ting
The highly conserved Grainyhead-like (Grhl) family of transcription factors, comprising three members in vertebrates (Grhl1-3), play critical regulatory roles during embryonic development, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Although loss of Grhl function leads to multiple neural abnormalities in numerous animal models, a comprehensive analysis of Grhl expression and function in the mammalian brain has not been reported. Here we show that only Grhl3 expression is detectable in the embryonic mouse brain; particularly within the habenula, an organ known to modulate repressive behaviours...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28170158/why-marmosets
#16
EDITORIAL
Cory T Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27804251/psychophysical-measurement-of-marmoset-acuity-and-myopia
#17
Samuel U Nummela, Shanna H Coop, Shaun L Cloherty, Chantal J Boisvert, Mathias Leblanc, Jude F Mitchell
The common marmoset has attracted increasing interest as a model for visual neuroscience. A measurement of fundamental importance to ensure the validity of visual studies is spatial acuity. The marmoset has excellent acuity that has been reported at the fovea to be nearly half that of the human (Ordy and Samorajski []: Vision Res 8:1205-1225), a value that is consistent with them having similar photoreceptor densities combined with their smaller eye size (Troilo et al. []: Vision Res 33:1301-1310). Of interest, the marmoset exhibits a higher proportion of cones than rods in peripheral vision than human or macaque, which in principle could endow them with better peripheral acuity depending on how those signals are pooled in subsequent processing...
March 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739220/the-marmoset-as-a-model-system-for-studying-voluntary-motor-control
#18
REVIEW
Jeff Walker, Jason MacLean, Nicholas G Hatsopoulos
The common marmoset has recently gained interest as an animal model for systems and behavioral neuroscience. This is due in part to the advent of transgenic marmosets, which affords the possibility of combining genetic manipulations with physiological recording and behavioral monitoring to study neural systems. In this review, they will argue that the marmoset provides a unique opportunity to study the neural basis of voluntary motor control from an integrative perspective. First, as an intermediate animal model, the marmoset represents an important bridge in motor system function between other primates, including humans, and rodents...
March 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739195/marmoset-vocal-communication-behavior-and-neurobiology
#19
REVIEW
Steven J Eliades, Cory T Miller
There has been recent increasing interest in the use of marmosets, a New World primate species, as a model in biomedical research. One of the principal advantages of marmosets as a research model is their rich vocal repertoire and communicative vocal behaviors displayed both in the wild and in captivity. Studies of this species' vocal communication system have the potential to reveal the evolutionary underpinnings of human speech, and therefore are of interest to the neuroscience and biology research communities...
March 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706919/the-common-marmoset-an-overview-of-its-natural-history-ecology-and-behavior
#20
REVIEW
Nicola Schiel, Antonio Souto
Callithrix jacchus are small-bodied Neotropical primates popularly known as common marmosets. They are endemic to Northeast Brazil and occur in contrasting environments such as the humid Atlantic Forest and the dry scrub forest of the Caatinga. Common marmosets live in social groups, usually containing only one breeding pair. These primates have a parental care system in which individuals help by providing assistance to the infants even when they are not related to them. Free-ranging groups use relatively small home ranges (0...
March 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
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