journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Developmental Neurobiology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907268/special-issue-on-oxytocin-in-development-and-plasticity
#1
REVIEW
Ron Stoop, Xiang Yu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907267/mitogenic-action-of-hypoxia-upon-cutaneous-neuroepithelial-cells-in-developing-zebrafish
#2
Benjamin W Dean, Thalia J Rashid, Michael G Jonz
In zebrafish, cutaneous neuroepithelial cells (NECs) contain serotonin (5-HT) and are believed to initiate physiological and behavioral responses to hypoxia during embryonic and early larval development, when mature gills and O2 chemoreceptors are not yet present. The number of skin NECs rapidly declines as embryos develop into larvae, but acclimation to hypoxia leads to retention of a greater number of these cells. We hypothesized that reduction of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) in water would stimulate mitosis in cutaneous NECs in zebrafish...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907266/retinal-axon-guidance-at-the-midline-chiasmatic-misrouting-and-consequences
#3
REVIEW
Delphine S Prieur, Alexandra Rebsam
The visual representation of the outside world relies on the appropriate connectivity between the eyes and the brain. Retinal ganglion cells are the sole neurons that send an axon from the retina to the brain, and thus the guidance decisions of retinal axons en route to their targets in the brain shape the neural circuitry that forms the basis of vision. Here, we focus on the choice made by retinal axons to cross or avoid the midline at the optic chiasm. This decision allows each brain hemisphere to receive inputs from both eyes corresponding to the same visual hemifield, and is thus crucial for binocular vision...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907249/grainyhead-like-3-grhl3-deficiency-in-brain-leads-to-altered-locomotor-activity-and-decreased-anxiety-like-behaviours-in-aged-mice
#4
Sebastian Dworkin, Alana Auden, Darren D Partridge, Maria Daglas, Robert L Medcalf, Theo Mantamadiotis, Smitha R Georgy, Charbel Darido, Stephen M Jane, Stephen B Ting
The highly conserved Grainyhead-like (Grhl) family of transcription factors, comprising three members in vertebrates (Grhl1-3), play critical regulatory roles during embryonic development, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Although loss of Grhl function leads to multiple neural abnormalities in numerous animal models, a comprehensive analysis of Grhl expression and function in the mammalian brain has not been reported. Here we show that only Grhl3 expression is detectable in the embryonic mouse brain; particularly within the habenula, an organ known to modulate repressive behaviours...
December 1, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27804277/the-neurobiological-causes-and-effects-of-alloparenting
#5
REVIEW
William M Kenkel, Allison M Perkeybile, C Sue Carter
Alloparenting, defined as care provided by individuals other than parents, is a universal behavior among humans that has shaped our evolutionary history and remains important in contemporary society. Dysfunctions in alloparenting can have serious and sometimes fatal consequences for vulnerable infants and children. In spite of the importance of alloparenting, we still have much to learn regarding the underlying neurobiological systems governing its expression. Here, we review how a lack of alloparental behavior among traditional laboratory species has led to a blind spot in our understanding of this critical facet of human social behavior and the relevant neurobiology...
November 2, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27804275/oxytocin-mediated-behavior-in-invertebrates-an-evolutionary-perspective
#6
REVIEW
Meghan A Lockard, Margaret S Ebert, Cornelia I Bargmann
The molecular and functional conservation of oxytocin-related neuropeptides in behavior is striking. In animals separated by at least 600 million years of evolution, from roundworms to humans, oxytocin homologs play critical roles in the modulation of reproductive behavior and other biological functions. Here, we review the roles of oxytocin in invertebrate behavior from an evolutionary perspective. We begin by tracing the evolution of oxytocin through the invertebrate animal lineages, and then describe common themes in invertebrate behaviors that are mediated by oxytocin-related peptides, including reproductive behavior, learning and memory, food arousal, and predator/prey relationships...
November 2, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27804251/psychophysical-measurement-of-marmoset-acuity-and-myopia
#7
Samuel U Nummela, Shanna H Coop, Shaun L Cloherty, Chantal J Boisvert, Mathias Leblanc, Jude F Mitchell
The common marmoset has attracted increasing interest as a model for visual neuroscience. A measurement of fundamental importance to ensure the validity of visual studies is spatial acuity. The marmoset has excellent acuity that has been reported at the fovea to be nearly half that of the human (Ordy and Samorajski, 1968), a value that is consistent with them having similar photoreceptor densities combined with their smaller eye size (Troilo et al, 1993). Of interest, the marmoset exhibits a higher proportion of cones than rods in peripheral vision than human or macaque, which in principle could endow them with better peripheral acuity depending on how those signals are pooled in subsequent processing...
November 2, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739256/progesterone-from-maternal-circulation-binds-to-progestin-receptors-in-fetal-brain
#8
Christine K Wagner, Princy Quadros-Mennella
Steroid hormones activate nuclear receptors which, as transcription factors, can regulate critical aspects of neural development. Many regions of the rat forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain express progestin receptors (PR) during perinatal life, suggesting that progesterone may play an important role in the development of the brain. An immunohistochemical approach using two antibodies with differential recognition of ligand-bound PR was used to examine whether fetuses are exposed to maternal progesterone during pregnancy and whether progesterone from maternal circulation can bind to PR within the fetal brain...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739248/thalamic-neuronal-specification-and-early-circuit-formation
#9
Henrik Gezelius, Guillermina Lopez-Bendito
The thalamus is a central structure of the brain, primarily recognized for the relay of incoming sensory and motor information to the cerebral cortex but also key in high order intracortical communication. It consists of glutamatergic projection neurons organized in several distinct nuclei, each having a stereotype connectivity pattern and functional roles. In the adult these nuclei can be appreciated by architectural boundaries, though their developmental origin and specification is only recently beginning to be revealed...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739221/cooperation-and-crosstalk-in-axon-guidance-cue-integration-additivity-synergy-and-fine-tuning-in-combinatorial-signalling
#10
Daniel Morales, Artur Kania
Neural circuit development involves the coordinated growth and guidance of axons to their targets. Following the identification of many guidance cue molecules, recent experiments have focussed on the interactions of their signalling cascades, which can be generally classified as additive or non-additive depending on the signal convergence point. While additive (parallel) signalling suggests limited molecular interaction between the pathways, non-additive signalling involves crosstalk between pathways and includes more complex synergistic, hierarchical, and permissive guidance cue relationships...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739220/the-marmoset-as-a-model-system-for-studying-voluntary-motor-control
#11
Jeff Walker, Jason MacLean, Nicholas G Hatsopoulos
The common marmoset has recently gained interest as an animal model for systems and behavioral neuroscience. This is due in part to the advent of transgenic marmosets, which affords the possibility of combining genetic manipulations with physiological recording and behavioral monitoring to study neural systems. In this review, we will argue that the marmoset provides a unique opportunity to study the neural basis of voluntary motor control from an integrative perspective. First, as an intermediate animal model, the marmoset represents an important bridge in motor system function between other primates, including humans, and rodents...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739195/marmoset-vocal-communication-behavior-and-neurobiology
#12
Steven J Eliades, Cory T Miller
There has been recent increasing interest in the use of marmosets, a New World primate species, as a model in biomedical research. One of the principal advantages of marmosets as a research model is their rich vocal repertoire and communicative vocal behaviors displayed both in the wild and in captivity. Studies of this species' vocal communication system have the potential to reveal the evolutionary underpinnings of human speech, and therefore are of interest to the neuroscience and biology research communities...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706925/minocycline-causes-widespread-cell-death-and-increases-microglial-labeling-in-the-neonatal-mouse-brain
#13
J Alex Strahan, William H Walker, Taylor R Montgomery, Nancy G Forger
Minocycline, an antibiotic of the tetracycline family, inhibits microglia in many paradigms and is among the most commonly used tools for examining the role of microglia in physiological processes. Microglia may play an active role in triggering developmental neuronal cell death, although findings have been contradictory. To determine whether microglia influence developmental cell death, we treated perinatal mice with minocycline (45 mg/kg) and quantified effects on dying cells and microglial labeling using immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 (AC3) and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), respectively...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706924/the-corticospinal-tract-evolution-development-and-human-disorders
#14
Quentin Welniarz, Isabelle Dusart, Emmanuel Roze
The corticospinal tract (CST) plays a major role in cortical control of spinal cord activity. In particular, it is the principal motor pathway for voluntary movements. Here, we discuss: (i) the anatomic evolution and development of the CST across mammalian species, focusing on its role in motor functions; (ii) the molecular mechanisms regulating corticospinal tract formation and guidance during mouse development; and (iii) human disorders associated with abnormal CST development. A comparison of CST anatomy and development across mammalian species first highlights important similarities...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706919/the-common-marmoset-an-overview-of-its-natural-history-ecology-and-behavior
#15
Nicola Schiel, Antonio Souto
Callithrix jacchus are small-bodied Neotropical primates popularly known as common marmosets. They are endemic to Northeast Brazil and occur in contrasting environments such as the humid Atlantic Forest and the dry scrub forest of the Caatinga. Common marmosets live in social groups, usually containing only one breeding pair. These primates have a parental care system in which individuals help by providing assistance to the infants even when they are not related to them. Free-ranging groups use relatively small home ranges (0...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706918/application-of-viral-vectors-to-the-study-of-neural-connectivities-and-neural-circuits-in-the-marmoset-brain
#16
Akiya Watakabe, Osamu Sadakane, Katsusuke Hata, Masanari Ohtsuka, Masafumi Takaji, Tetsuo Yamamori
It is important to study the neural connectivities and functions in primates. For this purpose, it is critical to be able to transfer genes to certain neurons in the primate brain so that we can image the neuronal signals and analyze the function of the transferred gene. Toward this end, our team has been developing gene transfer systems using viral vectors. In this review, we summarize our current achievements as follows. 1) We compared the features of gene transfer using five different AAV serotypes in combination with three different promoters, namely, CMV, mouse CaMKII (CaMKII), and human synapsin 1 (hSyn1), in the marmoset cortex with those in the mouse and macaque cortices...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706916/anatomical-and-functional-neuroimaging-in-awake-behaving-marmosets
#17
Afonso C Silva
The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small New World monkey that has gained significant recent interest in neuroscience research, not only because of its compatibility with gene editing techniques, but also due to its tremendous versatility as an experimental animal model. Neuroimaging modalities, including anatomical (MRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), complemented by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and electrophysiology, have been at the forefront of unraveling the anatomical and functional organization of the marmoset brain...
October 5, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643955/splice-form-dependent-regulation-of-axonal-arbor-complexity-by-fmrp
#18
Stephanie E Zimmer, Steven G Doll, A Denise R Garcia, Michael R Akins
The autism-related protein Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA binding protein that plays important roles during both nervous system development and experience dependent plasticity. Alternative splicing of the Fmr1 locus gives rise to 12 different FMRP splice forms that differ in the functional and regulatory domains they contain as well as in their expression profile among brain regions and across development. Complete loss of FMRP leads to morphological and functional changes in neurons, including an increase in the size and complexity of the axonal arbor...
September 19, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27626613/oxytocin-modulation-of-neural-circuits-for-social-behavior
#19
Bianca J Marlin, Robert C Froemke
Oxytocin is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has gained attention for the effects on social behavior. Recent findings shed new light on the mechanisms of oxytocin in synaptic plasticity and adaptively modifying neural circuits for social interactions such as conspecific recognition, pair bonding, and maternal care. Here, we review several of these newer studies on oxytocin in the context of previous findings, with an emphasis on social behavior and circuit plasticity in various brain regions shown to be enriched for oxytocin receptors...
September 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618403/ischemia-reduces-inter-alpha-inhibitor-proteins-in-the-brain-of-the-ovine-fetus
#20
Mariya S Spasova, Xiaodi Chen, Grazyna B Sadowska, Edward R Horton, Yow-Pin Lim, Barbara S Stonestreet
Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is a major cause of neurological abnormalities in the perinatal period. Inflammation contributes to the evolution of HI brain injury. Inter-alpha inhibitor proteins (IAIPs) are a family of proteins that are part of the innate immune system. We have reported that endogenous IAIPs exhibit developmental changes in ovine brain and that exogenous IAIP treatment reduces neuronal death in HI neonatal rats. However, the effects of HI on endogenous IAIPs in brain have not been previously examined...
September 12, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
journal
journal
41580
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"