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Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966206/middle-ear-barotrauma-causing-transient-facial-nerve-paralysis-after-scuba-diving
#1
Matthew Lee Carmichael, K Paul Boyev
Middle ear barotrauma is a well known entity with typical injury occurring when diving or ascending in a commercial jetliner. Patients often present with symptoms of acute onset otalgia, hearing loss and sometimes haemotympanum (with or without tympanic membrane perforation). On rare occasions, facial nerve paralysis can occur when the tympanic segment of the facial nerve is dehiscent within the middle ear. We present a case of spontaneously resolving facial nerve palsy associated with middle ear barotrauma following a brief, shallow dive...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966205/increasing-the-probability-of-surviving-loss-of-consciousness-underwater-when-using-a-rebreather
#2
REVIEW
Paul Haynes
Re-circulating underwater breathing apparatus (rebreathers) have become increasingly popular amongst sport divers. In comparison to open-circuit scuba, rebreathers are complex life support equipment that incorporates many inherent failure modes and potential for human error. This individually or in combination can lead to an inappropriate breathing gas. Analysis of rebreather diving incidents suggests that inappropriate breathing gas is the most prevalent disabling agent. This can result in spontaneous loss of consciousness (LoC), water aspiration and drowning...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966204/the-influence-of-pressure-changes-on-the-retentive-force-and-coronal-microleakage-of-different-types-of-posts-in-endodontically-treated-teeth-during-simulated-dives
#3
Gergo Mitov, Florian Draenert, Paul Schumann, Marcus Stötzer, Constantin von See
OBJECTIVES: We assessed the influence of a simulated diving environment on the interfacial microleakage and retentive forces of different post types in root-canal-filled teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One-hundred-and-twenty extracted, single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated and were randomly divided into three groups according to the post and cement used: ER Post/Harvard cement (Titanium), CeraPost/DentinBuild Evo (Zirconia), DT Light Post/Calibra (FRC). Each group was randomly divided into two equal subgroups, a control group, and an experimental group, subjected to simulated dives to 456 kPa in a diving chamber...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966203/estimating-the-risk-of-a-scuba-diving-fatality-in-australia
#4
John Lippmann, Christopher Stevenson, David McD Taylor, Jo Williams
INTRODUCTION: There are few data available on which to estimate the risk of death for Australian divers. This report estimates the risk of a scuba diving fatality for Australian residents, international tourists diving in Queensland, and clients of a large Victorian dive operator. METHODOLOGY: Numerators for the estimates were obtained from the Divers Alert Network Asia-Pacific dive fatality database. Denominators were derived from three sources: Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Surveys, 2001-2010 (Australian resident diving activity data); Tourism Research Australia surveys of international visitors to Queensland 2006-2014 and a dive operator in Victoria 2007-2014...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966202/provisional-report-on-diving-related-fatalities-in-australian-waters-in-2011
#5
John Lippmann, Christopher Lawrence, Andrew Fock, Scott Jamieson, Richard Harris
INTRODUCTION: An individual case review of diving-related deaths reported as occurring in Australia in 2011 was conducted as part of the DAN Asia-Pacific dive fatality reporting project. METHOD: The case studies were compiled using reports from witnesses, the police and coroners. In each case, the particular circumstances of the accident and, where available, details from the post-mortem examination are provided. A chain of events analysis was conducted for each case...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966201/the-demographics-and-diving-behaviour-of-dan-asia-pacific-members-with-and-without-pre-existing-medical-conditions
#6
John Lippmann, David McD Taylor, Christopher Stevenson, Simon Mitchell
INTRODUCTION: This report examines Diver Alert Network Asia-Pacific (DAN AP) members with and without cardiac or respiratory conditions, diabetes or hypertension and compares their demographics, health and diving activities. METHODOLOGY: Two online cross-sectional surveys of DAN AP members were conducted. The first sought information from 833 divers who applied for membership between July 2009 and August 2013 and who had declared the targeted medical conditions...
December 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723024/hypothesis-the-influence-of-cavitation-or-vacuum-phenomenon-for-decompression-sickness
#7
LETTER
Costantino Balestra
Dr Yanagawa and his colleagues present an interesting hypothesis, and our group has had some discussions around this vacuum phenomenon and decompression sickness (DCS). I am aware of at least one diver in whom symptoms appeared after a 'self-manipulation' of his lower lumbar spine. The diver exited the water symptom-free and approximately 1.5 hours after the dive went to the hotel swimming pool. Before getting into the water, he self manipulated his lumbar spine as he was in the habit of doing, provoking the familiar cracking sound...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723023/hypothesis-the-influence-of-cavitation-or-vacuum-phenomenon-for-decompression-sickness
#8
LETTER
Youichi Yanagawa, Kazuhiko Omori, Kouhei Ishikawa, Kei Jitsuiki, Toshihiko Yoshizawa, Ikuto Takeuchi, Hiromichi Ohsaka
Attention has recently been focused on the vacuum phenomenon detected by computed tomography (CT), where gas in the human body is incidentally detected by CT. We introduce our hypothesis that the vacuum phenomenon increases the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in subjects who engage in post-diving exercise. When the screw propeller of a ship operates underwater, a swirling effect called cavitation occurs. This swirling effect is closely related to the ship's propulsive efficiency as well as propeller cracking and damage...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723022/insulin-dependent-diabetes-mellitus-and-recreational-scuba-diving-in-australia
#9
Rebecca Johnson
Dive medicine bodies worldwide recognise that, with comprehensive screening and careful management, people with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) can dive safely. Despite this, people with IDDM in Australia are generally denied access to dive training, an out-dated status quo that is not acceptable to the Australian diabetes community. This paper reflects upon the important advocacy work that has been done to progress this issue, and what is still required to open up access and bring Australia into line with more flexible and supportive international standards...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723021/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-diabetic-diver-the-undersea-and-hyperbaric-medical-society-divers-alert-network-protocol-for-diving-with-diabetes-in-action
#10
Rebecca Johnson
Some people with well-managed insulin-dependent diabetes can dive safely. Those cleared to participate should control tightly the variables that impact blood glucose levels, including activity, timing, food and insulin. Honest self-assessment is critical. A diabetic diver should cancel a dive if seasick, unusually anxious, or following significant high or low blood glucose levels in the preceding 24 hours. The diver should enter the water with a blood glucose level above 8.3 mmol·L⁻¹ and below 14 mmol·L⁻¹ with a stable or rising trend in blood glucose established with glucose tests at 90, 60, and 30 minutes prior to a dive...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723020/carbon-dioxide-absorbents-for-rebreather-diving
#11
LETTER
John Pennefather
Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723019/requests-for-emergency-hyperbaric-oxygen-treatment-for-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-in-ankara-turkey
#12
Münïre Kübra Özgök-Kangal, Iclal Karatop-Cesur, Gökhan Akcali, Senol Yildiz, Günalp Uzun
BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common in Turkey. Our department is the main provider of emergency hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in Ankara and neighboring cities. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CO-poisoned patients who were referred by phone to our department for emergency HBOT. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of phone consultations with emergency departments regarding the need for treatment of CO-poisoned patients with HBOT between 14 January 2014 and 14 January 2015...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723018/the-effect-of-general-anaesthesia-and-neuromuscular-blockade-on-eustachian-tube-compliance-a-prospective-study
#13
Akeelesh Mungur, Guy Cochard, Yves Ozier, Pierre Lafère
OBJECTIVE: The most common complications of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) are related to pressure changes on gas-containing cavities. Therefore, inability to auto-inflate the middle ear may result in transient or permanent hearing loss. However, it seems that middle ear barotrauma (MEBt) does not develop more often in mechanically ventilated patients than in ambulatory patients. This might be explained by deep sedation of these patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether anaesthesia and/or neuromuscular blockade can influence Eustachian tube (ET) function...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723017/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-in-the-treatment-of-sudden-sensorineural-hearing-loss-a-retrospective-analysis-of-outcomes
#14
Susannah Sherlock, Kenneth Thistlethwaite, Alessandro Rubini, Mohsina Khatun, Christopher Perry, Alexis Tabah
OBJECTIVE: To analyse predictive factors affecting outcome after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT) in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). METHODS: This is a retrospective audit of outcome in 77 consecutive patients referred for consideration of HBOT for ISSHL for either adjunctive treatment or after failure of steroid therapy. The hearing measured from the pre- and post-HBOT pure-tone audiogram (PTA4) at four frequencies; 500 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz and 4 kHz, was averaged and compared...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723016/safety-of-transport-and-hyperbaric-oxygen-treatment-in-critically-ill-patients-from-padua-hospitals-into-a-centrally-located-stand-alone-hyperbaric-facility
#15
Gerardo Bosco, Giacomo Garetto, Alessandro Rubini, Antonio Paoli, Prachiti Dalvi, Devanand Mangar, Enrico M Camporesi
INTRODUCTION: Some patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) might require repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) while receiving critical care. In such cases, the presence of a hyperbaric chamber located inside or near an ICU is preferable; however, this set-up is not always possible. In Padua, the "Associazione Tecnici IPerbarici" hyperbaric centre is a stand-alone facility outside of a hospital. Despite this, selected ICU patients receive HBOT at this facility. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records from 2003 to 2013 of 75 consecutive, critically-ill patients, 28 of whom were initially intubated and mechanically ventilated whilst undergoing HBOT...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723015/thirty-years-of-american-cave-diving-fatalities
#16
Leah Potts, Peter Buzzacott, Petar Denoble
INTRODUCTION: Cave divers enter an inherently dangerous environment that often includes little visibility, maze-like passageways and a ceiling of rock that prevents a direct ascent to the surface in the event of a problem. METHODS: Reports of cave diving fatality cases occurring between 01 July 1985 and 30 June 2015 collected by Divers Alert Network were reviewed. Training status, safety rules violated, relevancy of the violations, and root causes leading to death were determined...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723014/danish-diving-related-fatalities-1999-2012
#17
Julie Vinkel, Peter Bak, Ole Hyldegaard
AIM: The purpose was to explore causative tendencies among diving fatalities to prevent similar injuries in the future. METHODS: We report 33 fatal diving injuries that occurred among Danish divers during the period 1999-2012 in Scandinavian waters. The study was performed as a retrospective overview. The empiric data consists of police reports, forensic autopsy reports and examination of the diving equipment. Data were assembled and analyzed using Pivot and Excel...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723013/influence-of-the-diving-wetsuit-on-standard-spirometry
#18
Nico Am Schellart, Wouter Sterk
: INTRODUCTION A well-fitting wetsuit exerts a pressure on the body that may influence spirometry. This pressure is expected to reduce the forced vital capacity (FVC) due to hampered inspiration. Since the shape of the spirometric flow curve should not be changed by the pressure effects of the wetsuits, FVC, the forced expiratory volume during the first second of expiration (FEV₁), the peak expiratory flow (PEF) and the flow between 25 and 75% of FVC (FEF25-75) should change to the same degree...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723012/poorly-designed-research-does-not-help-clarify-the-role-of-hyperbaric-oxygen-in-the-treatment-of-chronic-diabetic-foot-ulcers
#19
EDITORIAL
Mesut Mutluoglu, Gunalp Uzun, Michael Bennett, Peter Germonpré, David Smart, Daniel Mathieu
Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are one of the most common indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT). The role of HBOT in DFUs is often debated. Recent evidence based guidelines, while recommending its use, urge further studies to identify the patient subgroups most likely to benefit from HBOT. A recent study in Diabetes Care aimed to assess the efficacy of HBOT in reducing the need for major amputation and improving wound healing in patients with chronic DFUs. In this study, patients with Wagner grade 2-4 diabetic foot lesions were randomly assigned to have HBOT (30 sessions/90 min/244 kPa) or sham treatment (30 sessions/90 min/air/125 kPa)...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27390806/pre-emptive-treatment-with-hyperbaric-oxygen-following-radiation-therapy-for-head-and-neck-cancer-may-prevent-the-onset-of-late-radiation-tissue-injury
#20
COMMENT
Danielle Wood, Michael Bennett
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
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