journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914223/osteogenesis-imperfecta-new-genes-reveal-novel-mechanisms-in-bone-dysplasia
#1
REVIEW
Heeseog Kang, A C S Aryal, Joan C Marini
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by fragile bones and short stature and known for its clinical and genetic heterogeneity which is now understood as a collagen-related disorder. During the last decade, research has made remarkable progress in identifying new OI-causing genes and beginning to understand the intertwined molecular and biochemical mechanisms of their gene products. Most cases of OI have dominant inheritance. Each new gene for recessive OI, and a recently identified gene for X-linked OI, has shed new light on its (often previously unsuspected) function in bone biology...
November 19, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908750/mesenchymal-stromal-cell-based-therapies-reduce-obesity-and-metabolic-syndromes-induced-by-a-high-fat-diet
#2
Chien-Wei Lee, Wei-Ting Hsiao, Oscar K Lee
Obesity is an alarming global health problem that results in multiaspect metabolic syndromes in both genders and most age groups. The lack of effective therapies for obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome is an urgent societal issue. To elucidate whether mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies can ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity and compare the effectiveness of several methodological approaches, we transplanted human MSCs, MSC-derived brown adipocytes (M-BA), and MSC lysateinto obese mice...
November 12, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893988/endothelin-signaling-in-bone
#3
REVIEW
Jasmin Kristianto, Michael G Johnson, Rafia Afzal, Robert D Blank
The endothelin (ET) system includes 3 small peptide hormones and a pair of G protein-coupled receptors. All 3 ETs are secreted as biologically inert precursors that must be activated by proteolytic cleavage after secretion. This reaction can be catalyzed by a pair of specific, membrane-bound extracellular ET converting enzymes or by nonspecific tissue proteases. The ET1/EDNRA axis is essential in development, with knockout mice for either displaying a similar phenotype featuring multiple defects of the craniofacial skeleton and cardiac outflow tract...
November 11, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893987/transdisciplinary-approaches-enhance-the-production-of-translational-knowledge
#4
REVIEW
Timothy H Ciesielski, Melinda C Aldrich, Carmen J Marsit, Robert A Hiatt, Scott M Williams
The primary goal of translational research is to generate and apply knowledge that can improve human health. Although research conducted within the confines of a single discipline has helped us to achieve this goal in many settings, this unidisciplinary approach may not be optimal when disease causation is complex and health decisions are pressing. To address these issues, we suggest that transdisciplinary approaches can facilitate the progress of translational research, and we review publications that demonstrate what these approaches can look like...
November 10, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886976/airway-and-serum-adipokines-after-allergen-and-diesel-exposure-in-a-controlled-human-crossover-study-of-atopic-adults
#5
Marabeth M Kramer, Jeremy A Hirota, Akshay Sood, Kay Teschke, Christopher Carlsten
Adipokines are mediators released from adipose tissue. These proteins are regarded as active elements of systemic and pulmonary inflammation, whose dysregulation can alter an individual's risk of developing allergic lung diseases. Despite this knowledge, adipokine responses to inhaled stimuli are poorly understood. We sought to measure serum and lung adiponectin, leptin, and resistin in an atopic adult study population following exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust (DE). Two types of lung samples including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and bronchial wash (BW), and a time course of serum samples, were collected from the 18 subjects who participated in the randomized, double-blinded controlled human study...
November 9, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842222/molecular-imaging-of-the-kidney-in-lupus-nephritis-to-characterize-response-to-treatment
#6
Samir V Parikh, Ana Malvar, Huijuan Song, Valeria Alberton, Bruno Lococo, Jay Vance, Jianying Zhang, Lianbo Yu, Dan Birmingham, Brad H Rovin
The consequences of treatment for the kidney at the molecular level have not been explored in human lupus nephritis (LN). In this investigation, changes in intrarenal transcript expression were measured and correlated with response in a LN cohort that underwent serial kidney biopsies. The intrarenal transcript expression of 19 patients with proliferative LN (Class III or IV) was measured at diagnostic biopsy (Bx1) and after induction therapy was completed (Bx2) using Nanostring technology. Patients were segregated by clinical response into complete responders (n = 5, CR) or nonresponders (n = 4, NR)...
November 1, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855281/car-t-therapy-for-leukemia-progress-and-challenges
#7
REVIEW
Xin Wang, Qing Xiao, Zhe Wang, Wen-Li Feng
Despite the rapid development of therapeutic strategies, leukemia remains a type of difficult-to-treat hematopoietic malignancy that necessitates introduction of more effective treatment options to improve life expectancy and quality of patients. Genetic engineering in adoptively transferred T cells to express antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has proved highly powerful and efficacious in inducing sustained responses in patients with refractory malignancies, as exemplified by the success of CD19-targeting CAR-T treatment in patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia...
October 27, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837649/using-gwas-to-identify-novel-therapeutic-targets-for-osteoporosis
#8
REVIEW
Olivia L Sabik, Charles R Farber
Osteoporosis is a common, increasingly prevalent, global health burden characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of fracture. Despite its significant impact on human health, there is currently a lack of highly effective treatments free of side effects for osteoporosis. Therefore, a major goal in the field is to identify new drug targets. Genetic discovery has been shown to be effective in the unbiased identification of novel drug targets and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have begun to provide insight into genetic basis of osteoporosis...
October 27, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832936/feeding-the-microbiota-gut-brain-axis-diet-microbiome-and-neuropsychiatry
#9
REVIEW
Kiran V Sandhu, Eoin Sherwin, Harriët Schellekens, Catherine Stanton, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
The microbial population residing within the human gut represents one of the most densely populated microbial niche in the human body with growing evidence showing it playing a key role in the regulation of behavior and brain function. The bidirectional communication between the gut microbiota and the brain, the microbiota-gut-brain axis, occurs through various pathways including the vagus nerve, the immune system, neuroendocrine pathways, and bacteria-derived metabolites. This axis has been shown to influence neurotransmission and the behavior that are often associated with neuropsychiatric conditions...
October 21, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832937/withdrawn-the-microbiome-and-human-disease-pathogenesis-how-do-you-do-what-you-do-to-me-%C3%A2
#10
Edward N Janoff
This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.
October 19, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832935/the-microbiome-and-human-disease-pathogenesis-how-do-you-do-what-you-do-to-me-%C3%A2
#11
Edward N Janoff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818230/effect-of-ppar-%C3%AE-%C3%AE-agonist-gw0742-treatment-in-the-acute-phase-response-and-blood-brain-barrier-permeability-following-brain-injury
#12
Khouloud Chehaibi, Laura le Maire, Sarah Bradoni, Joan Carles Escola, Francisco Blanco-Vaca, Mohamed Naceur Slimane
The systemic response to ischemic stroke is associated with the hepatic acute phase response (APR) that modulates leukocytes recruitment to the injured brain. The inappropriate recruitment of leukocytes to the brain parenchyma can result in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Emerging data suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPAR-β/δ) activation has a potential neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke. However, mechanisms of PPAR-β/δ mediated protection in ischemic insults remain unclear...
October 18, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27816505/advances-in-imaging-approaches-to-fracture-risk-evaluation
#13
REVIEW
Mary Kate Manhard, Jeffry S Nyman, Mark D Does
Fragility fractures are a growing problem worldwide, and current methods for diagnosing osteoporosis do not always identify individuals who require treatment to prevent a fracture and may misidentify those not a risk. Traditionally, fracture risk is assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, which provides measurements of areal bone mineral density at sites prone to fracture. Recent advances in imaging show promise in adding new information that could improve the prediction of fracture risk in the clinic...
October 17, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27815136/phenylquinoxalinone-cftr-activator-as-potential-prosecretory-therapy-for-constipation
#14
Onur Cil, Puay-Wah Phuan, Jung-Ho Son, Jie S Zhu, Colton K Ku, Niloufar Akhavan Tabib, Andrew P Teuthorn, Loretta Ferrera, Nicholas C Zachos, Ruxian Lin, Luis J V Galietta, Mark Donowitz, Mark J Kurth, A S Verkman
Constipation is a common condition for which current treatments can have limited efficacy. By high-throughput screening, we recently identified a phenylquinoxalinone activator of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel that stimulated intestinal fluid secretion and normalized stool output in a mouse model of opioid-induced constipation (Cil et al Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 2:317-327, 2016). Here, we report phenylquinoxalinone structure-activity analysis, mechanism of action, animal efficacy data in acute and chronic models of constipation, and functional data in ex vivo primary cultured human enterocytes...
October 15, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27810413/noncoding-rnas-in-the-development-diagnosis-and-prognosis-of-colorectal-cancer
#15
REVIEW
Mingjiao Weng, Di Wu, Chao Yang, Haisheng Peng, Guangyu Wang, Tianzhen Wang, Xiaobo Li
More than 90% of the human genome is actively transcribed, but less than 2% of the total genome encodes protein-coding RNA, and thus, noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is a major component of the human transcriptome. Recently, ncRNA was demonstrated to play important roles in multiple biological processes by directly or indirectly interfering with gene expression, and the dysregulation of ncRNA is associated with a variety of diseases, including cancer. In this review, we summarize the function and mechanism of miRNA, long intergenic ncRNA, and some other types of ncRNAs, such as small nucleolar RNA, circular ncRNA, pseudogene RNA, and even protein-coding mRNA, in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC)...
October 14, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27810412/on-the-value-of-therapeutic-interventions-targeting-the-complement-system-in-acute-myocardial-infarction
#16
REVIEW
Reindert W Emmens, Diana Wouters, Sacha Zeerleder, S Marieke van Ham, Hans W M Niessen, Paul A J Krijnen
The complement system plays an important role in the inflammatory response subsequent to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study is to create a systematic overview of studies that have investigated therapeutic administration of complement inhibitors in both AMI animal models and human clinical trials. To enable extrapolation of observations from included animal studies toward post-AMI clinical trials, ex vivo studies on isolated hearts and proof-of-principle studies on inhibitor administration before experimental AMI induction were excluded...
October 14, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27728824/individual-variability-in-response-to-a-single-sickling-event-for-normal-sickle-cell-and-sickle-trait-erythrocytes
#17
M Tarasev, M Muchnik, L Light, K Alfano, S Chakraborty
Hemoglobin S (Hb-S) polymerization is the primary event in sickle cell disease causing irreversible damage to red blood cell (RBC) membranes over repeated polymerization cycles. A single polymerization triggered by a hypoxic environment was reported to result in reversibly (upon reoxygenation) decreased RBC deformability and increased mechanical fragility (MF). Individualized responses have not been reported, although RBC fragility can vary significantly even among healthy individuals. This study evaluates individual variability in response to a single hypoxia-induced sickling event, through changes in RBC MF...
September 23, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27702550/modulation-of-cytotoxic-responses-by-targeting-cd160-prolongs-skin-graft-survival-across-major-histocompatibility-class-i-barrier
#18
Maria-Luisa Del Rio, Ana Maria Bravo Moral, Carlos Fernandez-Renedo, Leo Buhler, Jose-Antonio Perez-Simon, Olivier Chaloin, Rafael Alvarez Nogal, Maximino Fernandez-Caso, Jose-Ignacio Rodriguez-Barbosa
CD160 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily. It exhibits a pattern of expression coincident in humans and mice that is mainly restricted to cytotoxic cells and to all intestinal intraepithelial T lymphocytes. B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 interact with cysteine-rich domain 1 of the extracellular region of Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM). CD160 engagement by HVEM can deliver inhibitory signals to a small subset of human CD4 T cells and attenuate its proliferation and cytokine secretion, but can also costimulate natural killer cells or intraepithelial lymphocytes...
September 15, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27693468/parkin-regulates-lipopolysaccharide-induced-proinflammatory-responses-in-acute-lung-injury
#19
Eleftheria Letsiou, Saad Sammani, Huashan Wang, Patrick Belvitch, Steven M Dudek
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious condition resulting from direct or indirect lung injury that is associated with high mortality and morbidity. A key biological event in the pathogenesis of the acute lung injury (ALI) that causes acute respiratory distress syndrome is activation of the lung endothelium cells (ECs), which is triggered by a variety of inflammatory insults leading to barrier disruption and excessive accumulation of neutrophils. Recently, we demonstrated that imatinib protects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced EC activation by inhibiting c-Abl kinase...
September 13, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686718/microbiome-and-food-allergy
#20
Ana B Blázquez, M Cecilia Berin
Food allergy is a common disease affecting approximately 8% of children and 5% of adults. The prevalence has increased over the last two decades, suggesting an important environmental contribution to susceptibility. Studies have identified mode of birth, pet exposure, and having older siblings as being significant risk modifying factors in the development of food allergy. With the discovery that these factors significantly impact the composition of the intestinal microbiome, which is known to play a critical role in shaping the immune system, recent studies have begun to address the role of the intestinal microbiota in the development of food allergy...
September 13, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
journal
journal
41423
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"