journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30419567/letter-to-his-father-by-franz-kafka-literary-reconstruction-of-a-traumatic-childhood
#1
Elisabete Castelon Konkiewitz, Edward B Ziff
Franz Kafka's Letter to His Father is one of the greatest examples in world literature of memory of a traumatic childhood. In it, the author takes a retrospective journey through his life, recollecting and analyzing the reasons for the estrangement and hostility between a father and a son. This essay considers Letter to His Father in the light of current knowledge about autobiographical memory. The essay first sets forth basic aspects of Kafka's life in order to place Letter to His Father in the context of Kafka's biography, and then presents Kafka's relevance to the literature and thought of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30419563/machado-de-assis-original-sin
#2
Gabriel R de Freitas
Machado de Assis (1839-1908) suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy, probably with origin in the non-dominant hemisphere. The evidence for this is provided by the detailed reports of the characteristics of his seizures by his contemporaries and by his correspondence with other writers. He was treated with bromides and homeopathy. It is unclear whether his neurological disorder influenced his artistic performance. What is evident is that he was deeply ashamed of the disease - he avoided the word "epilepsy" and just wrote about it in his personal correspondence with friends in the last years of his life...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336488/raymond-roussel-s-cure-with-pierre-janet
#3
Jean-Pierre Luauté
Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) was an eccentric writer whose strange novelistic and theatrical work was launched by the surrealists and is still worshipped by the French intelligentia. While writing his first text at the age of 19 years, he presented a delusional episode marked by the conviction that he was shining like a sun and that he had acquired universal glory. He "fell back to earth" when the book was published and he realized that no one was stopping to gaze at him. He later led a ritualized life, continuing to write and eventually achieving success - glory even - with the champions of the surrealist revolution, who saw the genius in him...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336485/abstract-expressionists-and-brain-disease
#4
Bartlomiej Piechowski-Jozwiak, Julien Bogousslavsky
Visual art is one of the means of non-verbal communication that bypasses cultural, societal, language and, more importantly, time differences. It allows for establishing a multilevel connection between the artist and art receiver. Production of visual art is a form of expression of emotions. Art reception involves the initiation of a cascade of emotions and thoughts based on visual input. One of the ways to express artistic content is through abstraction. Abstract visual art is based on portraying elements that do not represent any real, objective shapes, with the means of lines, colours, tones and texture...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336482/arthur-rimbaud-the-man-with-wind-soles-riders-osteosarcoma-with-postamputation-stump-pain
#5
Julien Bogousslavsky, Laurent Tatu
The famous poet Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) stopped writing poetry at 21 years and subsequently had a rather adventurous life mainly in the Arabic peninsula and Ethiopia. He died at 37 years, only a few months after the amputation of his right lower limb due to a developing tumor in the knee, which probably was an osteosarcoma in the lower third of the femur. His letters to his sister Isabelle suggest that he suffered from severe stump pain rather than phantom limb, but since he lived only shortly after surgery (he developed extensive carcinomatosis), one does not know whether a full phantom would have developed and how this would have affected his subsequent life...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336479/writers-as-shell-shock-witnesses-during-world-war-i
#6
Laurent Tatu, Julien Bogousslavsky
The issue of First World War shell shock has been documented mainly from a medical perspective. Many medical texts dealing with war psychoneuroses and their aggressive treatments, such as electrotherapy, were published during the war. Accounts from shell-shocked soldiers are rare. Nevertheless, shell shock was described from a non-medical point of view by a few writers who had undergone or witnessed this pathology. Their texts deal mainly with the psychiatric forms, the most striking ones, but also with the more common concepts of commotion, emotion and pathological fear...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336476/preliminaries
#7
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336472/louis-ferdinand-c%C3%A3-line-from-first-world-war-neurological-wound-to-mythomania
#8
Laurent Tatu, Odile Roynette, Julien Bogousslavsky
The writer Louis Ferdinand Céline (1894-1961) developed a personal style which changed twentieth century French literature. As an enlisted soldier in 1912, he was involved in the Great War and his right arm was severely wounded. After the war, he became a medical doctor and a writer who published his first novel, Voyage au bout de la nuit (Journey to the End of the Night), in 1932. In the middle of the 1930s, he began to write anti-Semitic and racist pamphlets and turned to a collaborationist stance with Nazi Germany...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336468/creative-minds-in-the-aftermath-of-the-great-war-four-neurologically-wounded-artists
#9
Claire Maingon, Laurent Tatu
Many artists were involved in the First World War. Some of them were mobilized, like millions of soldiers, others enlisted to fight on the battlefield. The stories of writers who returned neurologically wounded from the war, such as Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918) or Blaise Cendrars (1887-1961), are well-known. The cases of painters and sculptors who suffered from First World War neurological wounds are scarce. Nevertheless, their injuries led to intense modifications of artistic practice. We detail four examples of artists whose creative mind was impacted by their First World War neurological wounds or diseases...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336467/neurology-in-russian-writers-tolstoy-and-turgenev
#10
Riccardo Altavilla, Maurizio Paciaroni
The personal and bibliographical histories of the two Russian writers, Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoy and Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev, are strictly connected to social and scientific developments in nineteenth century Russia. In particular, in the field of medicine and of neurology, these two authors had personal issues and interests, kindled by Russia's opening to Western European thought. Neurology at the beginning of the nineteenth century was not developed in Russia, and in the second half of the century the new generation of neurologists trained abroad, in particular in France, where Charcot was an eminent figure who also travelled to Russia to help establish the new "Russian neurology...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336466/dissociation-delusion-and-the-splitting-of-the-self-in-the-trial-by-franz-kafka-phenomenology-and-neurobiology-of-schizophrenia
#11
Elisabete Castelon Konkiewitz, Edward Benjamin Ziff
In this essay, we propose an association between Franz Kafka's novel, The Trial, and phenomenological and neurobiological processes in schizophrenia. We begin by presenting a summary of the plot, pointing to some of its remarkable literary aspects. We next compare the mental processes of dissociation, disorientation and delusion as represented in the novel with phenomenological processes that take place in the prodromal states of schizophrenia. We discuss how such disorders of the self and disorders of thought, both crucial aspects of the schizophrenic experience, appear in The Trial and in other literary and private writings by Franz Kafka...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336462/cesare-pavese-the-laboratory-of-loneliness-a-study-of-among-women-only
#12
Jonathan Steffen
The Italian poet, novelist, translator, editor and diarist Cesare Pavese (1908-1950) famously committed suicide after winning the coveted Strega prize for his 1949 trilogy of novels La bella estate (The Beautiful Summer). This article discusses one of the novels in that trilogy, Among Women Only (Tra donne sole), presenting it as a psychological "laboratory" in which the intensely private Pavese explores the rationale for suicide on the very public stage of the novel. The author argues that the writing of Tra donne sole was one of the self-willed steps that made it not just possible for Pavese to commit suicide, but impossible not to...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336461/henrik-ibsen-s-battle-with-cerebrovascular-disease
#13
Jan C Frich
Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) is a Norwegian playwright and poet who is known as the father of modern drama. Ibsen was in good health when he announced at his 70th birthday celebration that he intended to continue writing. His last play, When We Dead Awaken, was published in 1899. Why did Ibsen's dramatic writing come to an end? This chapter presents a medical account of Ibsen's health condition during the last 6 years of his life. It is based on a review of a document written by one of his doctors, Edvard Bull (1845-1925), letters, biographic information, and Ibsen's death certificate...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336460/dementia-and-change-of-style-willem-de-kooning-obliteration-of-disease-patterns
#14
Bartlomiej Piechowski-Jozwiak, Julien Bogousslavsky
The studies on the relation between artistic production, especially visual art, and brain function gave a basis to the development of neuroesthetics. Most of the information on brain artistic creativity comes from studies on brain disease in well-established visual artists. Brain disease may cause change, dissolution, or emergence of artistic creativity. The visual artistic production may become impaired in individuals with a variety of brain diseases, including focal and generalised disorders of sudden and slowly progressive onset...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336459/travelling-into-alienation-and-neurology-with-a-painter-georges-moreau-1848-1901
#15
Olivier Walusinski
Georges Moreau (1848-1901) was a painter and the son of the famous psychiatrist Jacques-Joseph Moreau de Tours. Early in his career, his paintings aspired toward figurative perfection, exalting patriotic and historical themes. His prolific production includes numerous paintings for which he drew inspiration from psychology and certain mental pathologies. At the age of 45 years he suffered right hemiplegia which forced him to set aside large-scale subjects and focus instead on intimist, almost pointillistic works, which brought him closer to the Impressionists, as his portrait of Paul Cézanne shows...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336458/thomas-mann-and-neurology
#16
Nicoletta Caputi, Daniel Birnbaum, François Boller
Thomas Mann (1875-1955) is considered one of the most influential writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. In addition to his novels and essays, he was well known for his criticisms of the Nazi party, and particularly against the racial nationalism promoted by Adolf Hitler after the First World War, as well as for his depiction of diseases. Here, we provide a quick sketch of Mann's life and his relationship with nineteenth to twentieth century German society. We then proceed to describe how Mann became interested in diseases, how he used the diseases as metaphors, and his specific contribution to the field of neurology...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336457/joan-mir%C3%A3-and-cyclic-depression
#17
Montserrat G Delgado, Julien Bogousslavsky
Psychopathology has been closely related with artists. A link between creativity and a tendency to affective disorders has become widely accepted. Several studies have shown that artists suffer disproportionately high rates of mood disorders, particularly manic depression and major depression. The famous twentieth century Spanish artist Joan Miró suffered from depression during the entirety of his life, as was recognized by some authors in private letters. The artist worked using several styles, as well as in ceramics and sculpture...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336456/%C3%A3-douard-manet-s-tabes-dorsalis-from-painful-ataxia-to-phantom-limb
#18
Julien Bogousslavsky, Laurent Tatu
Édouard Manet (1832-1883) is considered the "father" of impressionism and even of twentieth century modern art. Manet's genius involved getting away from the classical narrative or historical topics and replacing them by the banality of daily life. Technically, he erased volumes into flat two-dimensional coloured planes, and distorted conventional perspective with often gross brushstrokes intentionally giving an "unfinished" aspect to the work. It is little known that Manet had a very painful second part of his life, due to excruciating limb and chest pains, which developed in parallel with proprioceptive ataxia and gait imbalance...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29208849/possessions-including-poltergeist-are-you-there-madness
#19
REVIEW
Olivier Walusinski
Beliefs involving the devil and possession figured in the nosography of mental illness that alienists gradually established during the 19th century. The description of this form of cenesthetic hallucination resulted in "the possessed" being viewed as patients, which protected them from the trials and punishments they so frequently faced in earlier centuries. According to psychologists, this illusion of mental duality is linked to impairment of introspective capacities. Current brain imaging suggests inappropriate activity of the default mode network, which interferes with attentional systems during the hallucinatory episode...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151099/camptocormia-new-signs-in-an-old-syndrome
#20
REVIEW
Laurent Tatu, Julien Bogousslavsky
Camptocormia is defined as an involuntary flexion of the thoracolumbar spine, without fixed kyphosis, which increases during walking and standing, and abates in the supine position. First described during World War 1 in soldiers suffering from war psychoneuroses, camptocormia has progressively come to refer to any cause of trunk forward-flexed posture during standing and ambulation. It is now admitted that camptocormia should be considered as a syndrome related to many etiologies. In this chapter, we present the historical aspects of the syndrome and its main etiologies...
2018: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience
journal
journal
41370
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"