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Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29232536/enhancing-the-effectiveness-of-work-groups-and-teams-a-reflection
#1
Steve W J Kozlowski
Teamwork has been at the core of human accomplishment across the millennia, and it was a focus of social psychological inquiry on small group behavior for nearly half a century. However, as organizations world-wide reorganized work around teams over the past two decades, the nature of teamwork and factors influencing it became a central focus of research in organizational psychology and management. In this article, I reflect on the impetus, strategy, key features, and scientific contribution of "Enhancing the Effectiveness of Work Groups and Teams," by Kozlowski and Ilgen, a review monograph published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest in 2006...
December 1, 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29232535/why-interventions-to-influence-adolescent-behavior-often-fail-but-could-succeed
#2
David S Yeager, Ronald E Dahl, Carol S Dweck
We provide a developmental perspective on two related issues: (a) why traditional preventative school-based interventions work reasonably well for children but less so for middle adolescents and (b) why some alternative approaches to interventions show promise for middle adolescents. We propose the hypothesis that traditional interventions fail when they do not align with adolescents' enhanced desire to feel respected and be accorded status; however, interventions that do align with this desire can motivate internalized, positive behavior change...
December 1, 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149587/%C3%A2-and-the-wisdom-to-know-the-difference-scholarly-success-from-a-wisdom-perspective
#3
Judith Glück
What makes a researcher wise? At least for the field of psychology, I argue that the two main characteristics of scholarly wisdom are a desire to understand, rather than to be right, and an orientation toward ethical values. These characteristics do not necessarily produce the highest levels of academic success. Because wisdom is partly context dependent, the actual wisdom of our scientific output could be increased by making some changes to our publication and evaluation culture-changes that might benefit our field and even the world around us...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149586/scholarly-merits-from-measurement-to-judgment
#4
Joachim Funke
The discussion in Perspectives on Psychological Science about criteria for scholarly merit shows a potential bias of quantitative measurements compared with informed judgments of scholarly merits. This comment argues for a selection procedure that is open for qualitative arguments.
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149585/are-twitter-and-blogs-important-tools-for-the-modern-psychological-scientist
#5
Yana Weinstein, Megan A Sumeracki
Psychological scientists have many roles, one of which is, arguably, to communicate their research findings to a broader audience. Twitter and blogging offer relatively inexpensive options for this type of outreach. Engagement in these outreach efforts can lead to career enhancement, but also comes at a cost. We examined a sample of 327 psychological scientists to determine the prevalence of this type of outreach; while the use of Twitter appears to be on the rise, blogging remains very rare. In this piece, we explore the costs and benefits for psychological scientists of blogging and engaging with the general public on Twitter, and how tweeting and blogging might relate to academic merit and varieties of fame in psychology...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149584/the-ill-fated-quest-for-fame-in-psychological-research
#6
Alexandra M Freund
The question "Am I famous yet?" directs our attention to the outcome of the journey of being a psychological scientist. There is nothing inherently wrong with wanting to achieve the highest possible outcomes when pursuing a goal. However, for a researcher, fame is an outcome that is very vague, abstract, distal, and unlikely to be attained. Focusing on this outcome might undermine motivation and persistence in the difficult endeavor of doing excellent research and contributing to psychological knowledge. To become an excellent psychological scientist might be a better outcome to which to aspire...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149583/why-traditional-metrics-may-not-adequately-represent-ethnic-minority-psychology
#7
Moin Syed
The first Perspectives on Psychological Science symposium on eminence in psychology focused almost exclusively on "traditional" markers of success (e.g., citation counts, awards, grants). In this essay, I argue that the context of the research and the context of the researchers are crucial components of ethnic minority psychology. First, I describe structural reasons for why ethnic minority researchers might have less impressive traditional markers of success; then, I highlight how the "minority tax" contours the scholarly activities of ethnic minority researchers...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149582/corrigendum-the-science-and-practice-of-self-control
#8
(no author information available yet)
Original article: Duckworth, A. L., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2017). The science and practice of self-control. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12, 715-718. doi:10.1177/1745691617690880 On p. 715, right column, first paragraph, Duckworth, Tsukayama, and May (2010) should have been cited instead of Emanuele et al. (2010). The reference list should not have included Emanuele et al. (2010). Instead, the following reference should have been included: Duckworth, A. L., Tsukayama, E., & May, H. (2010). Establishing causality using longitudinal hierarchical linear modeling: An illustration predicting achievement from self-control...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149581/family-matters-measuring-impact-through-one-s-academic-descendants
#9
Elizabeth J Marsh
Scientific contributions take many forms, not all of which result in fame or are captured in traditional metrics of success (e.g., h factor). My focus is on one of the most lasting and important contributions a scientist can make: training scientists who go on to train scientists, who in turn train more scientists, etc. Academic genealogies provide many examples of scientists whose names might not be recognizable today but who trained psychologists that went on to publish very influential work. Of course success results from a combination of many factors (including but not limited to the student's abilities and motivation, luck, institutional resources, mentoring, etc...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149580/will-analytics-suppress-a-diversity-of-ideas-in-psychological-science
#10
Eve De Rosa
In this article, I suggest that an overreliance on analytics to assess faculty productivity and the diffusion of ideas may inadvertently suppress innovation. Even when these productivity-diffusion metrics are used to promote an individual's work, the use of such external guideposts may bias scientific choices and curb a psychological scientist's earnest inclination to synthesize or take scientific risks. Analytics are not inert but can change the path and progress of science itself, potentially reducing the diversity of ideas in psychological science...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149579/doing-for-the-greater-good-what-price-in-academe
#11
Suniya S Luthar
In discussing how merit is commonly judged in academia, my focus in this article is not on dimensions that are currently considered but on those that warrant more attention. Grounded in suggestions offered by Sternberg, I argue here for increased recognition of faculty's commitment to intrinsic values-focused on community and relationships-and not just extrinsic ones that connote personal fame or status. I first summarize evidence of disillusionment among today's promising young scholars and then provide exemplars of role models who have, in fact, maintained high standards in both intrinsic and extrinsic domains...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149578/afterword-in-the-matter-of-judging-scientific-merit
#12
Robert J Sternberg
In this afterword, I suggest expanding upon some of the criteria for judging scientific merit that have been discussed in the two symposia on "judging scholarly merit in psychological science." I discuss in particular the value of creativity, analysis, common sense, and wisdom and ethics in scientific contributions and discourse. In the course of this discussion, I consider where the field of judging scientific merit has been, where it is now, and where it may go.
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149577/introduction-to-a-follow-up-symposium-on-am-i-famous-yet-judging-scholarly-merit-in-psychological-science
#13
Robert J Sternberg
I introduce a follow-up symposium to "'Am I Famous Yet?' Judging Scholarly Merit in Psychological Science," which was published in Perspectives on Psychological Science in November 2016. The follow-up symposium is intended to increase the diversity of contributors and contributions and thereby to continue and expand the discussion of how scholarly merit can be usefully evaluated in psychological science.
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149576/scholarly-merit-in-a-global-context-the-nation-gap-in-psychological-science
#14
Nathan N Cheek
Psychologists from the United States are extremely prominent in psychological science, publishing more articles and receiving more citations than researchers from other nations. In this brief article, I review some previous research on this "nation gap" in psychology and highlight relevant data from journals published by the Association for Psychological Science. I then discuss some possible explanations for the nation gap and touch on some of its implications for thinking about scholarly merit and scientific eminence...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149575/researchers-of-color-fame-and-impact
#15
Michael A Zárate, Gordon Nagayama Hall, Victoria C Plaut
Fame and eminence, as traditionally measured, limit the definition of impact to the publication world. We add two types of impact to the traditional measures of fame and eminence. Many of the traditional measures of fame or eminence are based on social-network connections, whereby individuals appoint other people to positions of eminence. Editorial boards are one specific example. Eminence is also limited to number of publications, for example, with little regard for the impact of those publications at the societal level...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125914/putting-culture-in-the-middle-in-judging-scholarly-merit
#16
Qi Wang
I discuss the critical importance of putting culture in the middle in judging scholarly merit in psychological science. I describe the challenges in evaluating cultural research, pointing out the various ways that ethnocentric judgments undermine the scientific merit of cultural research and the consequences of the marginalization of culture in psychological science and practice. In spite of the obstacles, cultural psychologists have made major scientific contributions and achieved scientific eminence. I further suggest that we raise the bar by including a broad, cultural approach to research as one basis for judging scientific contributions...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024610/tough-the-measure-of-merit-in-psychological-science
#17
Todd Lubart, Christophe Mouchiroud
Scientific careers depend largely on the evaluation of one's merit. Yet scientists agree that the measurement of merit is quite a complex endeavor. Some indicators exist, such as Hirsch's well-known h index, but none can fully capture the complexity of the notion of merit. We propose that the h factor should be complemented with additional useful measurements: the t, o, u, and g indexes.
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28937914/collective-psychological-ownership-and-intergroup-relations
#18
Maykel Verkuyten, Borja Martinovic
Whereas much social psychological research has studied the in-group and out-group implications of social categorization and collective identity ("we"), little research has examined the nature and relevance of collective psychological ownership ("ours") for intergroup relations. We make a case for considering collective psychological ownership as an important source of intergroup tensions. We do so by integrating theory and research from various social sciences, and we draw out implications for future social psychological research on intergroup relations...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934560/creativity-and-mood-disorder-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#19
Christa L Taylor
Although the belief that creativity is related to psychopathology is prevalent, empirical evidence is limited. Research findings relating to mood disorder in particular are mixed, possibly as a result of differing research approaches (e.g., assessing the creativity of individuals with versus without mood disorder opposed to the prevalence of mood disorder in creative versus noncreative individuals). Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to investigate prior research examining the link between mood disorder and creativity from three distinct research approaches...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934559/psychological-perspectives-on-interrogation
#20
Aldert Vrij, Christian A Meissner, Ronald P Fisher, Saul M Kassin, Charles A Morgan, Steven M Kleinman
Proponents of "enhanced interrogation techniques" in the United States have claimed that such methods are necessary for obtaining information from uncooperative terrorism subjects. In the present article, we offer an informed, academic perspective on such claims. Psychological theory and research shows that harsh interrogation methods are ineffective. First, they are likely to increase resistance by the subject rather than facilitate cooperation. Second, the threatening and adversarial nature of harsh interrogation is often inimical to the goal of facilitating the retrieval of information from memory and therefore reduces the likelihood that a subject will provide reports that are extensive, detailed, and accurate...
November 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
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