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Proceedings. Biological Sciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077778/uncertain-tree-discriminating-among-competing-approaches-to-the-phylogenetic-analysis-of-phenotype-data
#1
Mark N Puttick, Joseph E O'Reilly, Alastair R Tanner, James F Fleming, James Clark, Lucy Holloway, Jesus Lozano-Fernandez, Luke A Parry, James E Tarver, Davide Pisani, Philip C J Donoghue
Morphological data provide the only means of classifying the majority of life's history, but the choice between competing phylogenetic methods for the analysis of morphology is unclear. Traditionally, parsimony methods have been favoured but recent studies have shown that these approaches are less accurate than the Bayesian implementation of the Mk model. Here we expand on these findings in several ways: we assess the impact of tree shape and maximum-likelihood estimation using the Mk model, as well as analysing data composed of both binary and multistate characters...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077777/no-evidence-for-thermal-transgenerational-plasticity-in-metabolism-when-minimizing-the-potential-for-confounding-effects
#2
Ø N Kielland, C Bech, S Einum
Environmental change may cause phenotypic changes that are inherited across generations through transgenerational plasticity (TGP). If TGP is adaptive, offspring fitness increases with an increasing match between parent and offspring environment. Here we test for adaptive TGP in somatic growth and metabolic rate in response to temperature in the clonal zooplankton Daphnia pulex Animals of the first focal generation experienced thermal transgenerational 'mismatch' (parental and offspring temperatures differed), whereas conditions of the next two generations matched the (grand)maternal thermal conditions...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077776/odour-based-discrimination-of-similarity-at-the-major-histocompatibility-complex-in-birds
#3
Sarah Leclaire, Maria Strandh, Jérôme Mardon, Helena Westerdahl, Francesco Bonadonna
Many animals are known to preferentially mate with partners that are dissimilar at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in order to maximize the antigen binding repertoire (or disease resistance) in their offspring. Although several mammals, fish or lizards use odour cues to assess MHC similarity with potential partners, the ability of birds to assess MHC similarity using olfactory cues has not yet been explored. Here we used a behavioural binary choice test and high-throughput-sequencing of MHC class IIB to determine whether blue petrels can discriminate MHC similarity based on odour cues alone...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077775/dung-odours-signal-sex-age-territorial-and-oestrous-state-in-white-rhinos
#4
Courtney Marneweck, Andreas Jürgens, Adrian M Shrader
Mammals commonly communicate olfactorily via urine. However, the extent to which they communicate via dung, another waste product, is unknown. Behavioural studies suggest that mammals can obtain information from dung odours but are unclear about the information transmitted. Moreover, an understanding of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from dung is limited. To address this, we analysed the odours emitted from the dung of free-ranging white rhinos, and found that 2,3-dimethylundecane signalled an individual's sex, heptanal discriminated age class, nonane defined male territorial status and 2,6-dimethylundecane indicated female oestrous state...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077774/tropical-ancient-dna-reveals-relationships-of-the-extinct-bahamian-giant-tortoise-chelonoidis-alburyorum
#5
Christian Kehlmaier, Axel Barlow, Alexander K Hastings, Melita Vamberger, Johanna L A Paijmans, David W Steadman, Nancy A Albury, Richard Franz, Michael Hofreiter, Uwe Fritz
Ancient DNA of extinct species from the Pleistocene and Holocene has provided valuable evolutionary insights. However, these are largely restricted to mammals and high latitudes because DNA preservation in warm climates is typically poor. In the tropics and subtropics, non-avian reptiles constitute a significant part of the fauna and little is known about the genetics of the many extinct reptiles from tropical islands. We have reconstructed the near-complete mitochondrial genome of an extinct giant tortoise from the Bahamas (Chelonoidis alburyorum) using an approximately 1 000-year-old humerus from a water-filled sinkhole (blue hole) on Great Abaco Island...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077773/low-functional-diversity-promotes-niche-changes-in-natural-island-pollinator-communities
#6
Masayoshi K Hiraiwa, Atushi Ushimaru
Functional diversity loss among pollinators has rapidly progressed across the globe and is expected to influence plant-pollinator interactions in natural communities. Although recent findings suggest that the disappearance of a certain pollinator functional group may cause niche expansions and/or shifts in other groups, no study has examined this prediction in natural communities with high plant and pollinator diversities. By comparing coastal pollination networks on continental and oceanic islands, we examined how community-level flower visit patterns are influenced by the relative biomass of long-tongued pollinators (RBLP)...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077772/phylogenomics-provides-new-insight-into-evolutionary-relationships-and-genealogical-discordance-in-the-reef-building-coral-genus-acropora
#7
Natalie L Rosser, Luke Thomas, Sean Stankowski, Zoe T Richards, W Jason Kennington, Michael S Johnson
Understanding the genetic basis of reproductive isolation is a long-standing goal of speciation research. In recently diverged populations, genealogical discordance may reveal genes and genomic regions that contribute to the speciation process. Previous work has shown that conspecific colonies of Acropora that spawn in different seasons (spring and autumn) are associated with highly diverged lineages of the phylogenetic marker PaxC Here, we used 10 034 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to generate a genome-wide phylogeny and compared it with gene genealogies from the PaxC intron and the mtDNA Control Region in 20 species of Acropora, including three species with spring- and autumn-spawning cohorts...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077771/the-correlated-evolution-of-antipredator-defences-and-brain-size-in-mammals
#8
Theodore Stankowich, Ashly N Romero
Mammals that possess elaborate antipredator defences such as body armour, spines and quills are usually well protected, intermediate in size, primarily insectivorous and live in simple open environments. The benefits of such defences seem clear and may relax selection on maintaining cognitive abilities that aid in vigilance and predator recognition, and their bearers may accrue extensive production and maintenance costs. Here, in this comparative phylogenetic analysis of measurements of encephalization quotient and morphological defence scores of 647 mammal species representing nearly every order, we found that as lineages evolve stronger defences, they suffer a correlated reduction in encephalization...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077770/correction-to-life-history-characteristics-influence-physiological-strategies-to-cope-with-hypoxia-in-himalayan-birds
#9
S Barve, A A Dhondt, V B Mathur, Z A Cheviron
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077769/dog-directed-speech-why-do-we-use-it-and-do-dogs-pay-attention-to-it
#10
Tobey Ben-Aderet, Mario Gallego-Abenza, David Reby, Nicolas Mathevon
Pet-directed speech is strikingly similar to infant-directed speech, a peculiar speaking pattern with higher pitch and slower tempo known to engage infants' attention and promote language learning. Here, we report the first investigation of potential factors modulating the use of dog-directed speech, as well as its immediate impact on dogs' behaviour. We recorded adult participants speaking in front of pictures of puppies, adult and old dogs, and analysed the quality of their speech. We then performed playback experiments to assess dogs' reaction to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077768/corticosterone-and-timing-of-migratory-departure-in-a-songbird
#11
Cas Eikenaar, Florian Müller, Clara Leutgeb, Sven Hessler, Konstantin Lebus, Philip D Taylor, Heiko Schmaljohann
Bird migration entails replenishing fuel stores at stopover sites. There, individuals make daily decisions whether to resume migration, and must also decide their time of departure. Variation in departure timing affects the total time required to complete a migratory journey, which in turn affects fitness through arrival time at the breeding and wintering grounds. It is well established that stopover departure decisions are based on cues from innate rhythms, intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors. Yet, virtually nothing is known about the physiological mechanism(s) linking these cues to departure decisions...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077767/what-north-america-s-skeleton-crew-of-megafauna-tells-us-about-community-disassembly
#12
Matt Davis
Functional trait diversity is increasingly used to model future changes in community structure despite a poor understanding of community disassembly's effects on functional diversity. By tracking the functional diversity of the North American large mammal fauna through the End-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction and up to the present, I show that contrary to expectations, functionally unique species are no more likely to go extinct than functionally redundant species. This makes total functional richness loss no worse than expected given similar taxonomic richness declines...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077766/historical-citizen-science-to-understand-and-predict-climate-driven-trout-decline
#13
Miguel Clavero, Miquel Ninyerola, Virgilio Hermoso, Ana Filipa Filipe, Magda Pla, Daniel Villero, Lluís Brotons, Miguel Delibes
Historical species records offer an excellent opportunity to test the predictive ability of range forecasts under climate change, but researchers often consider that historical records are scarce and unreliable, besides the datasets collected by renowned naturalists. Here, we demonstrate the relevance of biodiversity records developed through citizen-science initiatives generated outside the natural sciences academia. We used a Spanish geographical dictionary from the mid-nineteenth century to compile over 10 000 freshwater fish records, including almost 4 000 brown trout (Salmo trutta) citations, and constructed a historical presence-absence dataset covering over 2 000 10 × 10 km cells, which is comparable to present-day data...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077765/acute-embryonic-anoxia-exposure-favours-the-development-of-a-dominant-and-aggressive-phenotype-in-adult-zebrafish
#14
Catherine M Ivy, Cayleih E Robertson, Nicholas J Bernier
Eutrophication and climate change are increasing the incidence of severe hypoxia in fish nursery habitats, yet the programming effects of hypoxia on stress responsiveness in later life are poorly understood. In this study, to investigate whether early hypoxia alters the developmental trajectory of the stress response, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 4 h of anoxia at 36 h post-fertilization and reared to adults when the responses to secondary stressors were assessed. While embryonic anoxia did not affect basal cortisol levels or the cortisol response to hypoxia in later life, it had a marked effect on the responses to a social stressor...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053063/correction-to-unravelling-darwin-s-entangled-bank-architecture-and-robustness-of-mutualistic-networks-with-multiple-interaction-types
#15
Wesley Dáttilo, Nubia Lara-Rodríguez, Pedro Jordano, Paulo R Guimarães, John N Thompson, Robert J Marquis, Lucas P Medeiros, Raul Ortiz-Pulido, Maria A Marcos-García, Victor Rico-Gray
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053062/a-lognormal-distribution-of-the-lengths-of-terminal-twigs-on-self-similar-branches-of-elm-trees
#16
Kohei Koyama, Ken Yamamoto, Masayuki Ushio
Lognormal distributions and self-similarity are characteristics associated with a wide range of biological systems. The sequential breakage model has established a link between lognormal distributions and self-similarity and has been used to explain species abundance distributions. To date, however, there has been no similar evidence in studies of multicellular organismal forms. We tested the hypotheses that the distribution of the lengths of terminal stems of Japanese elm trees (Ulmus davidiana), the end products of a self-similar branching process, approaches a lognormal distribution...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053061/food-availability-affects-adult-survival-trajectories-depending-on-early-developmental-conditions
#17
Michael Briga, Egbert Koetsier, Jelle J Boonekamp, Blanca Jimeno, Simon Verhulst
Food availability modulates survival in interaction with (for example) competition, disease and predators, but to what extent food availability in natural populations affects survival independent of these factors is not well known. We tested the effect of food availability on lifespan and actuarial senescence in a large population of captive zebra finches by increasing the effort required to obtain food, reflecting natural contrasts in food availability. Food availability may not affect all individuals equally and we therefore created heterogeneity in phenotypic quality by raising birds with different numbers of siblings...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053060/caste-biased-gene-expression-in-a-facultatively-eusocial-bee-suggests-a-role-for-genetic-accommodation-in-the-evolution-of-eusociality
#18
Beryl M Jones, Callum J Kingwell, William T Wcislo, Gene E Robinson
Developmental plasticity may accelerate the evolution of phenotypic novelty through genetic accommodation, but studies of genetic accommodation often lack knowledge of the ancestral state to place selected traits in an evolutionary context. A promising approach for assessing genetic accommodation involves using a comparative framework to ask whether ancestral plasticity is related to the evolution of a particular trait. Bees are an excellent group for such comparisons because caste-based societies (eusociality) have evolved multiple times independently and extant species exhibit different modes of eusociality...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053059/parsing-the-life-shortening-effects-of-dietary-protein-effects-of-individual-amino-acids
#19
Sara Arganda, Sofia Bouchebti, Sepideh Bazazi, Sophie Le Hesran, Camille Puga, Gérard Latil, Stephen J Simpson, Audrey Dussutour
High-protein diets shorten lifespan in many organisms. Is it because protein digestion is energetically costly or because the final products (the amino acids) are harmful? To answer this question while circumventing the life-history trade-off between reproduction and longevity, we fed sterile ant workers on diets based on whole proteins or free amino acids. We found that (i) free amino acids shortened lifespan even more than proteins; (ii) the higher the amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, the shorter ants lived and the lower their lipid reserves; (iii) for the same amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, ants eating free amino acids had more lipid reserves than those eating whole proteins; and (iv) on whole protein diets, ants seem to regulate food intake by prioritizing sugar, while on free amino acid diets, they seem to prioritize amino acids...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053058/mouthpart-conduit-sizes-of-fluid-feeding-insects-determine-the-ability-to-feed-from-pores
#20
Matthew S Lehnert, Andrew Bennett, Kristen E Reiter, Patrick D Gerard, Qi-Huo Wei, Miranda Byler, Huan Yan, Wah-Keat Lee
Fluid-feeding insects, such as butterflies, moths and flies (20% of all animal species), are faced with the common selection pressure of having to remove and feed on trace amounts of fluids from porous surfaces. Insects able to acquire fluids that are confined to pores during drought conditions would have an adaptive advantage and increased fitness over other individuals. Here, we performed feeding trials using solutions with magnetic nanoparticles to show that butterflies and flies have mouthparts adapted to pull liquids from porous surfaces using capillary action as the governing principle...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
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