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Proceedings. Biological Sciences

Tamer Oraby, Vivek Thampi, Chris T Bauch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Mikael Pontarp, Owen L Petchey
The expected link between competitive exclusion and community trait overdispersion has been used to infer competition in local communities, and trait clustering has been interpreted as habitat filtering. Such community assembly process inference has received criticism for ignoring trophic interactions, as competition and trophic interactions might create similar trait patterns. While other theoretical studies have generally demonstrated the importance of predation for coexistence, ours provides the first quantitative demonstration of such effects on assembly process inference, using a trait-based ecological model to simulate the assembly of a competitive primary consumer community with and without the influence of trophic interactions...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Dan-Dan He, Yueer Lu, Rachel Gittelman, Yabin Jin, Fei Ling, Akey Joshua
Viral selection pressure has acted on restriction factors that play an important role in the innate immune system by inhibiting the replication of viruses during primate evolution. Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family members are some of these restriction factors. It is becoming increasingly clear that gene expression differences, rather than protein-coding regions changes, could play a vital role in the anti-retroviral immune mechanism. Increasingly, recent studies have created genome-scale catalogues of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Nathalie Feiner
Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that can insert elsewhere in the genome and modify genome structure and gene regulation. The role of TEs in evolution is contentious. One hypothesis posits that TE activity generates genomic incompatibilities that can cause reproductive isolation between incipient species. This predicts that TEs will accumulate during speciation events. Here, I tested the prediction that extant lineages with a relatively high rate of speciation have a high number of TEs in their genomes...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Louise L Christensen, Colin Selman, Jonathan D Blount, Jill G Pilkington, Kathryn A Watt, Josephine M Pemberton, Jane M Reid, Daniel H Nussey
Oxidative stress (OS) is hypothesized to be a key physiological mechanism mediating life-history trade-offs, but evidence from wild populations experiencing natural environmental variation is limited. We tested the hypotheses that increased early life growth rate increases OS, and that increased OS reduces first-winter survival, in wild Soay sheep (Ovis aries) lambs. We measured growth rate and first-winter survival for four consecutive cohorts, and measured two markers of oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC)) and two markers of antioxidant (AOX) protection (total AOX capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD)) from blood samples...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
N A Kamenos, G Perna, M C Gambi, F Micheli, K J Kroeker
To understand the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on marine calcifiers, the trade-offs among different sublethal responses within individual species and the emergent effects of these trade-offs must be determined in an ecosystem setting. Crustose coralline algae (CCA) provide a model to test the ecological consequences of such sublethal effects as they are important in ecosystem functioning, service provision, carbon cycling and use dissolved inorganic carbon to calcify and photosynthesize. Settlement tiles were placed in ambient pH, low pH and extremely low pH conditions for 14 months at a natural CO2 vent...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Steven G Morgan, Alan L Shanks, Atsushi G Fujimura, Ad J H M Reniers, Jamie MacMahan, Chris D Griesemer, Marley Jarvis, Jenna Brown
Larvae of intertidal species develop at sea and must return to adult habitats to replenish populations. Similarly, nutrients, detritus and plankton provide important subsidies spurring growth and reproduction of macroalgae and filter-feeding invertebrates that form the foundation of intertidal communities. Together, these factors determine the density and intensity of interactions among community members. We hypothesized that spatial variation in surfzone hydrodynamics affects the delivery of plankton subsidies...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Chao Ma, Shao-Peng Li, Zhichao Pu, Jiaqi Tan, Manqiang Liu, Jing Zhou, Huixin Li, Lin Jiang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
John Rowan, Jason M Kamilar, Lydia Beaudrot, Kaye E Reed
Ecological research often assumes that species are adapted to their current climatic environments. However, climate fluctuations over geologic timescales have influenced species dispersal and extinction, which in turn may affect community structure. Modern community structure is likely to be the product of both palaeoclimate and modern climate, with the relative degrees of influence of past and present climates unknown. Here, we assessed the influence of climate at different time periods on the phylogenetic and functional trait structure of 203 African mammal communities...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Brad J Gemmell, Genesok Oh, Edward J Buskey, Tracy A Villareal
Phytoplankton sinking is an important property that can determine community composition in the photic zone and material loss to the deep ocean. To date, studies of diatom suspension have relied on bulk measurements with assumptions that bulk rates adequately capture the essential characteristics of diatom sinking. However, recent work has illustrated that individual diatom sinking rates vary considerably from the mean bulk rate. In this study, we apply high-resolution optical techniques, individual-based observations of diatom sinking and a recently developed method of flow visualization around freely sinking cells...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
James T Thorson, Anna Rindorf, Jin Gao, Dana H Hanselman, Henning Winker
The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution theory) or the basin model (BM; positive abundance-area relationship, supported by density-dependent habitat selection theory). The BM implies that fishes move towards preferred habitat as the population declines. We estimate the average relationship using bottom trawl data for 92 fish species from six marine regions, to determine whether the BM or PDM provides a better description for sea-bottom-associated fishes...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Morgan W Tingley, Viviana Ruiz-GutiƩrrez, Robert L Wilkerson, Christine A Howell, Rodney B Siegel
An emerging hypothesis in fire ecology is that pyrodiversity increases species diversity. We test whether pyrodiversity-defined as the standard deviation of fire severity-increases avian biodiversity at two spatial scales, and whether and how this relationship may change in the decade following fire. We use a dynamic Bayesian community model applied to a multi-year dataset of bird surveys at 1106 points sampled across 97 fires in montane California. Our results provide strong support for a positive relationship between pyrodiversity and bird diversity...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Reut Stahi, Ariel D Chipman
Segments are formed simultaneously in the blastoderm of the fly Drosophila melanogaster through a hierarchical cascade of interacting transcription factors. Conversely, in many insects and in all non-insect arthropods most segments are formed sequentially from the posterior. We have looked at segmentation in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. Posterior segments are formed sequentially, through what is probably the ancestral arthropod mechanism. Formation of anterior segments bears many similarities to the Drosophila segmentation mode...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Susanne A Kraemer, Rees Kassen
Strong divergent selection leading to local adaptation is often invoked to explain the staggering diversity of bacteria in microbial ecosystems. However, examples of specialization by bacterial clones to alternative niches in nature are rare. Here, we investigate the extent of local adaptation in natural isolates of pseudomonads and their relatives to their soil environments across both space and time. Though most isolates grew well in most environments, patchily distributed low-quality environments were found to drive specialization...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Emily Meineke, Elsa Youngsteadt, Robert R Dunn, Steven D Frank
A substantial amount of global carbon is stored in mature trees. However, no experiments to date test how warming affects mature tree carbon storage. Using a unique, citywide, factorial experiment, we investigated how warming and insect herbivory affected physiological function and carbon sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Manpreet K Dhami, Thomas Hartwig, Tadashi Fukami
Priority effects, in which the order of species arrival dictates community assembly, can have a major influence on species diversity, but the genetic basis of priority effects remains unknown. Here, we suggest that nitrogen scavenging genes previously considered responsible for starvation avoidance may drive priority effects by causing rapid resource depletion. Using single-molecule sequencing, we de novo assembled the genome of the nectar-colonizing yeast, Metschnikowia reukaufii, across eight scaffolds and complete mitochondrion, with gap-free coverage over gene spaces...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Paulo G Hofstatter, Alexander K Tice, Seungho Kang, Matthew W Brown, Daniel J G Lahr
Recombinase enzymes promote DNA repair by homologous recombination. The genes that encode them are ancestral to life, occurring in all known dominions: viruses, Eubacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota. Bacterial recombinases are also present in viruses and eukaryotic groups (supergroups), presumably via ancestral events of lateral gene transfer. The eukaryotic recA genes have two distinct origins (mitochondrial and plastidial), whose acquisition by eukaryotes was possible via primary (bacteria-eukaryote) and/or secondary (eukaryote-eukaryote) endosymbiotic gene transfers (EGTs)...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Glenn T Crossin, Tony D Williams
When successive stages in the life history of an animal directly overlap, physiological conflicts can arise resulting in carryover effects from one stage to another. The extreme egg-size dimorphism (ESD) of Eudyptes penguins, where the first-laid A-egg is approximately 18-57% smaller than the second-laid B-egg, has interested researchers for decades. Recent studies have linked variation in this trait to a carryover effect of migration that limits the physiology of yolk production and egg sizes. We assembled data on ESD and estimates of migration-reproduction overlap in penguin species and use phylogenetic methods to test the idea that migration-reproduction overlap explains variation in ESD...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Charles H Janson
There is considerable controversy about the existence, extent and adaptive value of integrated multimodal memory in non-human animals. Building on prior results showing that wild capuchin monkeys in Argentina appear to recall both the location and amount of food at patches they had previously visited, I tested whether they also track and use elapsed time as a basis for decisions about which feeding patches to visit. I presented them with an experimental array of eight feeding sites, at each of which food rewards increased with increasing elapsed time since the previous visit, similar to the pattern of ripe fruit accumulation in natural feeding trees...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
David C H Metzger, Patricia M Schulte
Maternal stress can have long-term effects on neurodevelopment that can influence offspring performance and population evolutionary trajectories. To examine the mechanistic basis for these neurodevelopmental effects of maternal stress, we used RNA-seq to assess differential gene expression across the brain transcriptome of adult male and female threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from stressed and unstressed mothers. We identified sexually divergent effects of maternal stress on the brain transcriptome...
September 28, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
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