journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27922735/virtual-cell-imaging-a-review-on-simulation-methods-employed-in-image-cytometry
#1
REVIEW
Vladimír Ulman, David Svoboda, Matti Nykter, Michal Kozubek, Pekka Ruusuvuori
The simulations of cells and microscope images thereof have been used to facilitate the development, selection, and validation of image analysis algorithms employed in cytometry as well as for modeling and understanding cell structure and dynamics beyond what is visible in the eyepiece. The simulation approaches vary from simple parametric models of specific cell components-especially shapes of cells and cell nuclei-to learning-based synthesis and multi-stage simulation models for complex scenes that simultaneously visualize multiple object types and incorporate various properties of the imaged objects and laws of image formation...
December 6, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911980/cell-based-dna-demethylation-detection-system-for-screening-of-epigenetic-drugs-in-2d-3d-and-xenograft-models
#2
Khushboo Agrawal, Viswanath Das, Miroslav Otmar, Marcela Krečmerová, Petr Džubák, Marián Hajdúch
Aberrant DNA methylation that results in silencing of genes has remained a significant interest in cancer research. Despite major advances, the success of epigenetic therapy is elusive due to narrow therapeutic window. A wide variety of naturally occurring epigenetic agents and synthetic molecules that can alter methylation patterns exist, however, their usefulness in epigenetic therapy remains unknown. This underlines the need for effective tumor models for large-scale screening of drug candidates with potent hypomethylation activity...
December 2, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911977/selective-inactivation-of-enzymes-conjugated-to-nanoparticles-using-tuned-laser-illumination
#3
Asaf Ilovitsh, Pazit Polak, Zeev Zalevsky, Orit Shefi
We report a novel method for specific deactivation of conjugated enzymes using laser-heated gold nanoparticles. Current methods involve treatment of the entire solution, thereby inactivating all bioactive components. Our method enables inactivation of only a single or subset of targeted enzymes. The selected enzyme is pre-conjugated to gold nanoparticles, which are specifically heated by a laser tuned to their surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate inactivation of a selected enzyme, glucose oxidase, within a mixture of biomolecules...
December 2, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875652/sample-preparation-for-flow-cytometry-benefits-from-some-lateral-thinking
#4
Andrew Filby
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 22, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875619/automated-leukocyte-processing-by-microfluidic-deterministic-lateral-displacement
#5
Curt I Civin, Tony Ward, Alison M Skelley, Khushroo Gandhi, Zendra Peilun Lee, Christopher R Dosier, Joseph L D'Silva, Yu Chen, MinJung Kim, James Moynihan, Xiaochun Chen, Lee Aurich, Sergei Gulnik, George C Brittain, Diether J Recktenwald, Robert H Austin, James C Sturm
We previously developed a Deterministic Lateral Displacement (DLD) microfluidic method in silicon to separate cells of various sizes from blood (Davis et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 2006;103:14779-14784; Huang et al., Science 2004;304:987-990). Here, we present the reduction-to-practice of this technology with a commercially produced, high precision plastic microfluidic chip-based device designed for automated preparation of human leukocytes (white blood cells; WBCs) for flow cytometry, without centrifugation or manual handling of samples...
November 22, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798817/optimization-of-mass-cytometry-sample-cryopreservation-after-staining
#6
Hermi R Sumatoh, Karen Wei Weng Teng, Yang Cheng, Evan W Newell
The advent of mass cytometry has facilitated highly multi-parametric single-cell analysis allowing for the deep assessment of cellular diversity. While the data and analytical power of this approach are well described, associated technical and experimental hurdles remain. Issues like equipment breakdown and sampling of large-scale batches, which may require multiple days of data acquisition, are minor but critical obstacles that prompt a technical solution, especially when dealing with precious samples. An ability to cryopreserve mass cytometry samples that have already been stained would alleviate numerous technical limitations we face with currently used sample-handling approaches...
October 31, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27768827/cell-size-assays-for-mass-cytometry
#7
Alan D Stern, Adeeb H Rahman, Marc R Birtwistle
Mass cytometry offers the advantage of allowing the simultaneous measurement of a greater number parameters than conventional flow cytometry. However, to date, mass cytometry has lacked a reliable alternative to the light scatter properties that are commonly used as a cell size metric in flow cytometry (forward scatter intensity-FSC). Here, we report the development of two plasma membrane staining assays to evaluate mammalian cell size in mass cytometry experiments. One is based on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) staining and the other on Osmium tetroxide (OsO4 ) staining, both of which have preferential affinity for cell membranes...
October 21, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754590/cluster-stability-in-the-analysis-of-mass-cytometry-data
#8
Rossella Melchiotti, Filipe Gracio, Shahram Kordasti, Alan K Todd, Emanuele de Rinaldis
Manual gating has been traditionally applied to cytometry data sets to identify cells based on protein expression. The advent of mass cytometry allows for a higher number of proteins to be simultaneously measured on cells, therefore providing a means to define cell clusters in a high dimensional expression space. This enhancement, whilst opening unprecedented opportunities for single cell-level analyses, makes the incremental replacement of manual gating with automated clustering a compelling need. To this aim many methods have been implemented and their successful applications demonstrated in different settings...
October 18, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27706900/omip-037-16-color-panel-to-measure-inhibitory-receptor-signatures-from-multiple-human-immune-cell-subsets
#9
Anna C Belkina, Jennifer E Snyder-Cappione
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 5, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27632791/when-polychromatic-flow-cytometry-meets-mitochondrial-reactive-oxygen-species
#10
Katarzyna Piwocka
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 15, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27632576/mass-cytometry-panel-optimization-through-the-designed-distribution-of-signal-interference
#11
Chikara Takahashi, Amelia Au-Yeung, Franklin Fuh, Teresa Ramirez-Montagut, Chris Bolen, William Mathews, William E O'Gorman
Mass cytometry is capable of measuring more than 40 distinct proteins on individual cells making it a promising technology for innovating biomarker discovery. However, in order for this potential to be fully realized, best practices in panel design need to be further defined in order to achieve consistency and reproducibility in data analysis. Of particular importance are controls that reveal, and panel design principles that mitigate the effects of signal interference or overlap. We observed a disparity between the staining profiles of two noncompeting anti- integrin β7 mAbs and hypothesized that signal interference was responsible...
September 15, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870536/teaching-advanced-flow-cytometry-in-africa-10-years-of-lessons-learned
#12
Elisa Nemes, Wendy A Burgers, Catherine Riou, Erica Andersen-Nissen, Guido Ferrari, Clive M Gray, Thomas Scriba
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870535/re-visiting-fc-receptor-blocking-maneuvers-in-man
#13
Paul J Smith, Pratip K Chattopadhyay
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870534/in-memoriam-bernard-bernie-a-shoor
#14
Donna Arndt-Jovin, Tom Jovin, L Scott Cram, Joe Gray, James Jett, Brian Mayall, Ben Verwer, Noel Warner, Ted Young, Laurence Marton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870533/set-them-free
#15
EDITORIAL
Attila Tárnok
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813253/international-society-for-advancement-of-cytometry-isac-flow-cytometry-shared-resource-laboratory-srl-best-practices
#16
Lora W Barsky, Michele Black, Matthew Cochran, Benjamin J Daniel, Derek Davies, Monica DeLay, Rui Gardner, Michael Gregory, Desiree Kunkel, Joanne Lannigan, James Marvin, Robert Salomon, Carina Torres, Rachael Walker
The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence...
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27768824/fluorescence-free-flow-cytometry-for-measurement-of-shape-index-distribution-of-resting-partially-activated-and-fully-activated-platelets
#17
A L Litvinenko, A E Moskalensky, N A Karmadonova, V M Nekrasov, D I Strokotov, A I Konokhova, M A Yurkin, E A Pokushalov, A V Chernyshev, V P Maltsev
Whereas commercially available hematological analyzers measure volume of individual platelets, angle-resolved light-scattering provides unique ability to additionally measure their shape index. We utilized the scanning flow cytometer to measure light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets taken from 16 healthy donors and the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem to retrieve the volume and shape index of each platelet. In normal conditions, the platelet shape index distribution (PSID) demonstrates three peaks, which relate to resting, partially activated, and fully activated platelets...
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754615/consistent-quantitative-gene-product-expression-3-invariance-with-age
#18
Michael R Loken, Andrew P Voigt, Lisa Eidenschink Brodersen, Wayne Fritschle, Andrew J Menssen, Denise A Wells
The quantitative expression of cell surface antigens and light scattering properties of five cellular reference populations in stressed bone marrow specimens were compared between pediatric and adult patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mean intensity of each antigen as well as the within patient and between patient variability showed striking consistency between the two different age groups. The only difference between the groups of specimens was the proportion of progenitor cells in the adult cohort averaged less than three times the proportion in the pediatric cohort...
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754578/consistent-quantitative-gene-product-expression-2-antigen-intensities-on-bone-marrow-cells-are-invariant-between-individuals
#19
Michael R Loken, Andrew P Voigt, Lisa Eidenschink Brodersen, Wayne Fritschle, Andrew J Menssen, Soheil Meshinchi, Denise A Wells
Five reference populations in bone marrow specimens were identified by flow cytometry using specific combinations of reagents in order define the variation of gene product expression intensities both within and between individuals. Mature lymphocytes, uncommitted progenitor cells, promyelocytes, mature monocytes and mature neutrophils can be reproducibly identified as distinct clusters of events in heterogeneous, maturing bone marrow specimens. Support Vector Machines were used to identify the reference populations in order to reduce subjective bias in manually defining boundaries of these populations since they were not discretely separated from the remainder of the cells...
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27731950/elimination-of-erroneous-results-in-flow-cytometry-caused-by-antibody-binding-to-fc-receptors-on-human-monocytes-and-macrophages
#20
Morten N Andersen, Sinan N H Al-Karradi, Tue W Kragstrup, Marianne Hokland
Nonspecific binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to Fc-receptors on leukocytes is an important cause of background fluorescence in flow cytometry, and failing to block such nonspecific binding can lead to erroneous results. A major part of previous studies on blocking reagents for flow cytometry have been done in mice, and published results are not completely in agreement. In humans, Fc-receptors are found on most leukocytes, with highest abundance on monocytes/macrophages. Therefore, in the present study our aim was to thoroughly investigate the efficiency of different commonly used blocking reagents regarding inhibition of nonspecific binding of mouse mAbs to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs)...
November 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
journal
journal
40909
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"