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Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166478/a-caregiving-experience-in-a-singaporean-chinese-family
#1
See Mieng Tan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 6, 2017: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166477/sitting-vigil-a-personal-reflection
#2
Meghan Thiel, Janice Firn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 6, 2017: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166476/a-deathbed-and-two-dozen-packets-of-jam
#3
Abigail Nathanson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 6, 2017: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28140778/psychosocial-well-being-of-young-people-who-participated-in-a-support-group-following-the-loss-of-a-parent-to-cancer
#4
Mariann Olsson, Tina Lundberg, Carl Johan Fürst, Joakim Öhlén, Ulla Forinder
Despite the evidence of unmet support needs among young people who have lost a parent to cancer, only a few support group initiatives have been reported. This observational prospective study explored the psychosocial well-being of young people who participated in support groups at a Swedish specialist palliative care setting. On three occasions, 29 participants, aged 16-28 years, answered questionnaires covering characteristics of the participants, circumstances of the losses, psychosocial well-being of the young people, and their own assessment of the support groups...
January 31, 2017: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938030/a-humble-letter-to-a-very-sick-friend-a-suggestive-missive
#5
Paul J Moon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938029/editor-s-introduction
#6
Ellen L Csikai
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938028/my-nana-s-hands
#7
Kristyn Fazzalaro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938027/the-stigma-experienced-by-terminally-ill-patients-evidence-from-a-portuguese-ethnographic-study
#8
Ana Patrícia Hilário
The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of peers, extended family members, and friends toward their visibly altered body...
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938026/caregiving-youth-knowledge-and-perceptions-of-parental-end-of-life-wishes-in-huntington-s-disease
#9
Melinda S Kavanaugh, Hyunjin Noh, Lixia Zhang
Knowledge of patient end-of-life (EOL) wishes and discussions are vital for family caregivers, including children and youth who may be in caregiving roles ("young carers" or "caregiving youth"). However, little is known about caregiving youth awareness and perceptions of EOL issues. This study sought to explore caregiving youth knowledge of EOL wishes and their willingness for EOL discussions. Face-to-face interviews with 40 caregiving youth ages 10-20, who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD), provided information about their knowledge of the presence of their ill parent's living will (LW) and durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC), and willingness to talk with the parent about EOL choices and possibility of death...
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938025/advancing-hospice-and-palliative-care-social-work-leadership-in-interprofessional-education-and-practice
#10
Susan Blacker, Barbara A Head, Barbara L Jones, Stacy S Remke, Katherine Supiano
The importance of interprofessional collaboration in achieving high quality outcomes, improving patient quality of life, and decreasing costs has been growing significantly in health care. Palliative care has been viewed as an exemplary model of interprofessional care delivery, yet best practices in both interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) in the field are still developing. So, too, is the leadership of hospice and palliative care social workers within IPE and IPP. Generating evidence regarding best practices that can prepare social work professionals for collaborative practice is essential...
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938024/conflicting-family-narrative-regarding-an-aids-related-death
#11
David Purnell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462957/exhaust-all-measures-ethical-issues-in-pediatric-end-of-life-care
#12
Kara J Thieleman, Cara Wallace, Andrea N Cimino, Heidi A Rueda
The death of a child may have a profound impact on parents, family members, and health care providers who provided care for the child. Unique challenges are faced by parents of seriously ill children as they must serve as the legal authority for health care decisions of children under age 18, although the child's wishes must also be considered. Social workers must balance core social work values, bioethical values, and psychosocial issues presented by such situations. While studies have been conducted with physicians and nurses regarding ethical issues in pediatric end-of-life care settings, little is known about how social workers experience these conflicts...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462956/emotional-support-for-health-care-professionals-a-therapeutic-role-for-the-hospital-ethics-committee
#13
David M Chooljian, James Hallenbeck, Stephen C Ezeji-Okoye, Robert Sebesta, Hasan Iqbal, Ware G Kuschner
Hospital ethics committees (HECs) are typically charged with addressing ethical disputes, conflicts, and dilemmas that arise in the course of patient care. HECs are not widely viewed as having a therapeutic role for health care professionals who experience psychological distress or anticipatory grief in the course of discharging professional duties. A case is presented in which an ethics consultation was requested, chiefly, to secure emotional support for health care professionals who had been asked by a patient to discontinue life-sustaining treatments...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462955/detained-and-dying-ethical-issues-surrounding-end-of-life-care-in-prison
#14
Meredith Stensland, Sara Sanders
Prisons are increasingly being called upon to provide end-of-life (EOL) care within the restrictive correctional environment. Several relatively recent phenomena have brought medical ethics to the forefront of prison EOL care-including aging behind bars, a paradigm shift in prison culture, the increasing rate of in-prison deaths, and the corresponding prison hospice movement. This article examines prominent ethical issues that emerge for prison personnel who are tasked with providing care to terminally ill offenders by presenting three offender composite characters that exemplify dying offenders and emergent ethical issues surrounding their care...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462954/rethinking-suffering-allowing-for-suffering-that-is-intrinsic-at-end-of-life
#15
Maxxine Rattner, Joan Berzoff
The dilemma so central to the work of providers of palliative and end-of-life care is the paradox of their professional and ethical duty to try to relieve suffering and the limitations of so doing. While the capacity to sit with suffering at the end of life is critical to clinical work, the idea that some intrinsic suffering cannot necessarily always be relieved may model for patients and families that suffering can be borne. Clinicians who encounter unrelievable suffering may feel a sense of failure, helplessness, moral distress, and compassion fatigue...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462953/room-432-bed-1
#16
Steve Popkin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462952/re-imagining-god-a-meditation-on-existential-suffering-at-the-end-of-life
#17
Glenn Meuche
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462951/the-wish-to-die-assisted-suicide-and-mental-illness
#18
Jennifer Hirsch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462950/hospice-core-professions-views-on-interdisciplinary-teams-a-qualitative-investigation
#19
Rie Kobayashi, Carolyn A McAllister
The hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) has been recognized as an ideal model for interprofessional collaboration. To address the manner in which interdisciplinary practices are perceived by team members, this study explored profession-based similarities and differences in perceptions among the four core hospice IDT members (physicians, nurses, social workers, and spiritual care providers) as well as experiences on the IDT. Semistructured interviews with 20 hospice professionals, 5 from each profession, were completed...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462949/use-of-contemporary-film-as-a-medium-for-teaching-an-online-death-and-grief-course
#20
Barbara A Head, Lisa C Smith
Online education is becoming commonplace in the academic world. Schools now offer totally online degree programs or provide a hybrid of face-to-face and online courses for fulfilling academic requirements. Developing courses and teaching online requires instructors to rethink the educational paradigms they have relied upon in the past. The Net Generation of learners brings a different set of expectations, styles, and needs to the classroom than those of previous generations; this mandates that instructors redesign courses and use contemporary teaching modalities...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
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