journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Heart Failure Clinics

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602378/heart-failure-in-older-adults
#1
EDITORIAL
Wilbert S Aronow, Ali Ahmed
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602377/end-of-life-care-in-the-treatment-of-heart-failure-in-older-adults
#2
REVIEW
John Arthur McClung
Heart failure presents unique challenges to the clinician who desires to provide excellent and humane care near the end of life. Accurate prediction of mortality in the individual patient is complicated by a chronic disease that is punctuated by recurrent acute episodes and sudden death. Health care providers continue to have difficulty communicating effectively with terminally ill patients and their caregivers regarding end-of-life care preferences, all of which needs to occur earlier rather than later. This article also discusses various means of providing palliative care, and specific issues regarding device therapy, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and palliative sedation with concurrent discussion of the ethical ramifications and pitfalls of each...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602376/left-ventricular-assist-device-in-older-adults
#3
REVIEW
Chris Caraang, Gregg M Lanier, Alan Gass, Wilbert S Aronow, Chhaya Aggarwal Gupta
Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are an effective therapy for a growing and aging population in the background of limited donor supply. Selecting the proper patient involves assessment of indications, risk factors, scores for overall outcomes, assessment for right ventricular failure, and optimal timing of implantation. LVAD complications have a 5% to 10% perioperative mortality and complications of bleeding, thrombosis, stroke, infection, right ventricular failure, and device failure. As LVAD engineering technology evolves, so will the risk-prediction scores...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602375/exercise-therapy-for-older-heart-failure-patients
#4
REVIEW
Jerome L Fleg
Both the aging process and heart failure (HF) syndrome are characterized by a dramatic reduction of aerobic capacity. Significant decreases in muscle mass and strength are also common. Few HF training studies have included meaningful numbers of older individuals, especially those greater than 80 years of age and older women with HF with reduced ejection fraction. The modest data available suggest similar benefits in older patients and excellent safety. Resistance training may provide additional benefit...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602374/treatment-of-ventricular-arrhythmias-and-use-of-implantable-cardioverter-defibrillators-to-improve-survival-in-older-adult-patients-with-cardiac-disease
#5
REVIEW
Jason T Jacobson, Sei Iwai, Wilbert S Aronow
Ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are well-recognized problems in the overall heart failure population, but treatment decisions can be more complex and nuanced in older patients. Sustained VA does not always lead to SCD, but identifies a higher risk population and may cause significant symptoms. Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and catheter ablation are the mainstays for prevention of VA, but have not been shown to improve mortality. The value of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) may be influenced by patient age...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602373/cardiac-resynchronization-therapy-in-older-adults-with%C3%A2-heart-failure
#6
REVIEW
Phillip H Lam, George E Taffet, Ali Ahmed, Steve Singh
Heart failure is a disease of poor prognosis marked by frequent hospitalizations, premature death, and impaired quality of life. Despite advances in medical therapy for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, mortality and hospitalizations with advanced disease are still increased and the quality of life continues to be poor in this population. The advent of cardiac resynchronization therapy has led to a significant improvement in both survival and symptom management in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602372/surgical-revascularization-in-older-adults-with-ischemic-cardiomyopathy
#7
REVIEW
Sahil Khera, Julio A Panza
With the totality of data supporting coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) for mortality benefit, symptomatic angina, and quality of life improvement, CABG should be a class I indication for patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and severe left ventricular dysfunction. As the population ages and more patients are referred for CABG, a careful risk-benefit assessment should be an important part of the consideration regarding revascularization strategies. A heart team approach is critical to arrive at the best decision for each patient...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602371/interventional-therapies-for-heart-failure-in-older-adults
#8
REVIEW
Dhaval Kolte, Jinnette Dawn Abbott, Herbert D Aronow
Heart failure (HF) remains the leading cause of hospitalization in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality despite the use of guideline-directed medical therapy. There has been tremendous progress in the development of novel transcatheter and interventional therapies for HF over the past decade. The evolution of structural heart disease interventions and interventional HF has led to a multidisciplinary heart team approach in the management of HF patients. Careful selection of the appropriate patient population and end points in future randomized controlled trials will be crucial to demonstrate the potential efficacy of the novel interventional HF therapies...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602370/the-role-of-positive-inotropic-drugs-in-the-treatment-of-older-adults-with-heart-failure-and-reduced-ejection-fraction
#9
REVIEW
Daniel J Dooley, Phillip H Lam, Ali Ahmed, Wilbert S Aronow
Positive inotropic drugs have long been studied for their potential benefits in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Although there has been an extensive amount of research about the clinical effects of these drugs in general, few studies examined their effect in older patients. Therefore, there is little or no evidence to guide the use of positive inotropes in older patients with HFrEF. However, recommendations from national heart failure guidelines may be generalized to older HFrEF patients on an individual basis, taking into consideration the basic geriatric principles of pharmacotherapy: start low and go slow...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602369/heart-failure-complicating-acute-mtyocardial-infarction
#10
REVIEW
Wilbert S Aronow
Factors predisposing the older person with acute myocardial infarction (MI) to develop heart failure (HF) include an increased prevalence of MI, multivessel coronary artery disease, decreased left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve, impairment of LV diastolic relaxation, increased hypertension, LV hypertrophy, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, and renal insufficiency. HF associated with acute MI should be treated with a loop diuretic. The use of nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta-blockers, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs; treatment of arrhythmias and mechanical complications; and indications for use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization is discussed...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602368/use-of-diuretics-in-the-treatment-of-heart-failure-in-older-adults
#11
REVIEW
Domenic A Sica, Todd W B Gehr, William H Frishman
Diuretics are the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in patients with heart failure, and in the short term they remain the most effective treatment for relief from fluid congestion. This article reviews the mode of action of the various diuretic classes and the physiologic adaptations that follow and sets up the basis for their use in the treatment of volume-retaining states, particularly as applies to the elderly. In addition, the article reviews the common side effects related to diuretics.
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602367/heart-failure-with-preserved-ejection-fraction-in-older-adults
#12
REVIEW
Bharathi Upadhya, Dalane W Kitzman
Most elderly patients, particularly women, who have heart failure, have a preserved ejection fraction. Patients with this syndrome have severe symptoms of exercise intolerance, frequent hospitalizations, and increased mortality. Despite the importance of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), the understanding of its pathophysiology is incomplete, and optimal treatment remains largely undefined. Unlike the management of HFrEF, there is a paucity of large evidence-based trials demonstrating morbidity and mortality benefit for the treatment of HFpEF...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602366/treatment-of-heart-failure-with-abnormal-left-ventricular-systolic-function-in-older-adults
#13
REVIEW
Wilbert S Aronow
Heart failure (HF) with abnormal left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction should be identified and treated. Treat hypertension with diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and β-blockers. Treat myocardial ischemia with nitrates and β-blockers. Treat volume overload and HF with diuretics. Treat HF with ACE inhibitors and β-blockers. Sacubitril/valsartan may be used instead of an ACE inhibitor or ARB in chronic symptomatic HF and abnormal LV ejection fraction. Add isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine in African Americans with class II to IV HF treated with diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and β-blockers...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602365/role-of-echocardiography-in-the-diagnostic-assessment-and-etiology-of-heart-failure-in-older-adults-opacify-quantify-and-rectify
#14
REVIEW
Vedant A Gupta, Navin C Nanda, Vincent L Sorrell
Echocardiography allows the assessment of systolic and diastolic function and identifies many of the common causes of heart failure (HF). Patients with minimally symptomatic or unsuspected left ventricular systolic dysfunction may be identified and receive the benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy. Echocardiography is also for assessing prognosis and can be used serially to evaluate treatment. Ventricular filling pressures, pulmonary artery pressures, and cardiac output can be sequentially determined...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602364/diagnosis-and-management-of-heart-failure-in-older-adults
#15
REVIEW
Gurusher Panjrath, Ali Ahmed
Aging is characterized by heterogeneity, both in health and illness. Older adults with heart failure often have preserved ejection fraction and atypical and delayed clinical manifestations. After diagnosis of heart failure is established, a cause should be sought. The patient's comorbidities may provide clues. An elevated jugular venous pressure is the most reliable clinical sign of fluid volume overload and should be carefully evaluated. Left ventricular ejection fraction must be determined to assess prognosis and guide therapy...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602363/epidemiology-pathophysiology-and-prognosis-of-heart-failure-in-older-adults
#16
REVIEW
Kumar Dharmarajan, Michael W Rich
Heart failure is the quintessential cardiovascular syndrome of aging that results from common cardiovascular conditions in older adults in conjunction with age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function. To a large extent, heart failure is a geriatric syndrome in much the same way that dementia, falls, and frailty are geriatric syndromes. The incidence and prevalence of heart failure increase strikingly with age and make heart failure the most common reason for hospitalization among older adults...
July 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279426/cardio-oncology-a-rapidly-evolving-and-expanding-field-of-medicine
#17
EDITORIAL
Daniel J Lenihan, Douglas B Sawyer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279425/current-concepts-of-cardiac-amyloidosis-diagnosis-clinical-management-and-the-need-for-collaboration
#18
REVIEW
Alexandra J Ritts, Robert F Cornell, Kris Swiger, Jai Singh, Stacey Goodman, Daniel J Lenihan
Cardiac amyloidosis is a complex and vexing clinical condition that requires a high degree of suspicion for the diagnosis with a substantial amount of discipline to discern the extent of disease and the best available therapy. There is a complex interplay between multiple organ systems, and the clinical presentation may involve a myriad of confusing clinical symptoms. The diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis can be confirmed with a combination of physical findings, cardiac biomarkers, noninvasive testing, and, if necessary, myocardial biopsy...
April 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279424/cardio-oncology-the-role-of-big-data
#19
REVIEW
Anant Mandawat, Andrew E Williams, Sanjeev A Francis
Despite its challenges, a "big data" approach offers a unique opportunity within the field of cardio-oncology. A pharmacovigilant approach using large data sets can help characterize cardiovascular toxicities of the rapidly expanding armamentarium of targeted therapies. Creating a broad coalition of data sharing can provide insights into the incidence of cardiotoxicity and stimulate research into the underlying mechanisms. Population health necessitates the use of big data and can help inform public health interventions to prevent both cancer and cardiovascular disease...
April 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279423/alternative-biomarkers-for-combined-biology
#20
REVIEW
Yong-Hyun Kim, Jennifer Kirsop, Wai Hong Wilson Tang
Chemotherapy-related cardiac dysfunction (CRCD) has challenged clinicians to hesitate in using cardiotoxic agents such as anthracycline and several protein kinase inhibitors. As early detection of CRCD and timely cessation of cardiotoxic agents became a strategy to avoid CRCD, cardiac troponin and natriuretic peptide are measured to monitor cardiotoxicity; however, there are inconsistencies in their predictability of CRCD. Alternative biomarkers have been researched extensively for potential use as more sensitive and accurate biomarkers...
April 2017: Heart Failure Clinics
journal
journal
40835
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"