journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

FEBS Journal

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889944/intramembrane-proteases-as-drug-targets
#1
REVIEW
Steven H L Verhelst
Proteases are considered attractive drug targets. Various drugs targeting classical, soluble proteases have been approved for treatment of human disease. Intramembrane proteases (IMPs) are a more recently discovered group of proteolytic enzymes. They are embedded in lipid bilayers and their active sites are located in the plane of a membrane. All four mechanistic families of IMPs have been linked to disease, but currently, no drugs against IMPs have entered the market. In this review, I will outline the function of IMPs with a focus on the ones involved in human disease, which includes Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and infectious diseases by microorganisms...
November 27, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886462/loss-of-ppr3-ppr4-ppr6-or-ppr10-perturbs-iron-homeostasis-and-leads-to-apoptotic-cell-death-in-schizosaccharomyces-pombe
#2
Yang Su, Yanmei Yang, Ying Huang
Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins characterized by tandem arrays of a degenerate 35-amino-acid repeat belong to a large family of RNA-binding proteins that are involved in posttranscriptional control of organelle gene expression. PPR proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, and particularly prevalent in higher plants. Schizosaccharomyces pombe has ten PPR proteins. Among them, ppr3, ppr4, ppr6 and ppr10 participate in mitochondrial posttranscriptional processes and are required for mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function...
November 25, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885812/a-whole-animal-chemical-screen-approach-to-identify-modifiers-of-intestinal-neutrophilic-inflammation
#3
Stefan H Oehlers, Maria Vega Flores, Christopher J Hall, Liuyang Wang, Dennis C Ko, Kathryn E Crosier, Philip S Crosier
By performing two high-content small molecule screens on DSS- and TNBS-induced zebrafish enterocolitis models of inflammatory bowel disease, we have identified novel anti-inflammatory drugs from the John Hopkins Clinical Compound Library that suppress neutrophilic inflammation. Live imaging of neutrophil distribution was used to assess the level of acute inflammation and concurrently screen for off-target drug effects. Supporting the validity of our screening strategy, most of the anti-inflammatory drug hits were known antibiotics or anti-inflammatory agents...
November 25, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885808/vp1-the-major-capsid-protein-of-the-mouse-polyomavirus-binds-microtubules-promotes-their-acetylation-and-blocks-the-host-cell-cycle
#4
Lenka Horníková, Martin Fraiberk, Petr Man, Václav Janovec, Jitka Forstová
VP1, the major structural protein of the mouse polyomavirus (MPyV), is the major architectural component of the viral capsid. Its pentamers are able to self-assemble into capsid-like particles and to non-specifically bind DNA. Surface loops of the protein interact with sialic acid of ganglioside receptors. Although the replication cycle of the virus, including virion morphogenesis, proceeds in the cell nucleus, a substantial fraction of the protein is detected in the cytoplasm of late-phase MPyV-infected cells...
November 25, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885799/the-c-terminal-extension-of-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-hsp16-3-regulates-its-oligomerization-subunit-exchange-dynamics-and-chaperone-function
#5
Alok Kumar Panda, Ayon Chakraborty, Sandip Kumar Nandi, Abhishek Kaushik, Ashis Biswas
Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a human pathogen that secretes a major immunodominant antigen namely Hsp16.3 throughout the course of infection. It belongs to small heat shock protein family and exhibits molecular chaperone function which is important for the growth and survival of M. tuberculosis in host cell macrophages. The importance of the N-terminal region on the structure and chaperone function of Hsp16.3 is well understood. However, the effect of the C-terminal region on these properties is far from clear...
November 25, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870503/the-role-of-type-ii-transmembrane-serine-protease-mediated-signaling-in-cancer
#6
Lauren M Tanabe, Karin List
Pericellular proteases have long been implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous research focused on these proteins, primarily as extracellular matrix (ECM) protein degrading enzymes which allowed cancer cells to breach the basement membrane and invade surrounding tissue. However, recently, there has been a shift in the view of cell surface proteases, including serine proteases, as proteolytic modifiers of particular targets, including growth factors and protease-activated receptors, which are critical for the activation of oncogenic signaling pathways...
November 21, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865080/cell-death-independent-activities-of-the-death-receptors-cd95-trailr1-and-trailr2
#7
REVIEW
Daniela Siegmund, Isabell Lang, Harald Wajant
Since their identification more than 20 years ago the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 have been intensively studied with respect to their cell death-inducing activities. These receptors, however, can also trigger a variety of cell death-independent cellular responses reaching from the activation of proinflammatory gene transcription programs over the stimulation of proliferation and differentiation to induction of cell migration. The cell death-inducing signaling mechanisms of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors are well understood...
November 19, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865066/newly-synthesized-camp-is-integrated-at-a-membrane-protein-complex-signalosome-to-ensure-receptor-response-specificity
#8
Raquel Guinzberg, Antonio Díaz-Cruz, Carlos Acosta-Trujillo, María Magdalena Vilchis-Landeros, Héctor Vázquez-Meza, Carlos Lozano-Flores, Natalia Chiquete-Felix, Alfredo Varela-Echavarría, Salvador Uribe-Carvajal, Héctor Riveros-Rosas, Enrique Piña
Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP within the cell is required to achieve receptor-specific responses. The mechanism through which the cell selects a specific response to new synthesized cAMP is not fully understood. In hepatocyte plasma membranes, we identified two functional and independent cAMP-responsive signaling protein macrocomplexes that produce, use, degrade, and regulate their own non-diffusible (sequestered) cAMP pool to achieve their specific responses. Each complex responds to the stimulation of an adenosine G-protein coupled receptor (Ado-GPCR), bound to either A2A or A2B , but not simultaneously to both...
November 19, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865056/the-caspase-activated-dnase-apoptosis-and-beyond
#9
REVIEW
Brian D Larsen, Claus S Sørensen
Organismal development and function requires multiple and accurate signal transduction pathways to ensure that proper balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, inactivation, and death is achieved. Cell death via apoptotic caspase signal transduction is extensively characterized and integral to this balance. Importantly, the view of apoptotic signal transduction has expanded over the previous decades. Sub-apoptotic caspase signaling has surfaced as mechanism that can promote the adoption of a range of cellular fates...
November 19, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860276/regulation-of-kynurenine-biosynthesis-during-influenza-virus-infection
#10
Lana Gaelings, Sandra Söderholm, Andrii Bugai, Yu Fu, Jatin Nandania, Bert Schepens, Martina B Lorey, Janne Tynell, Liesbeth Vande Ginste, Ronan Le Goffic, Matthew S Miller, Marika Kuisma, Varpu Marjomäki, Jef De Brabander, Sampsa Matikainen, Tuula A Nyman, Dennis Bamford, Xavier Saelens, Ilkka Julkunen, Henrik Paavilainen, Veijo Hukkanen, Vidya Velagapudi, Denis E Kainov
Influenza A viruses (IAVs) remain serious threats to public health because of the shortage of effective means of control. Developing more effective virus control modalities requires better understanding of virus-host interactions. It has previously been shown that IAV induces the production of kynurenine, which suppresses T-cell responses, enhances pain hypersensitivity and disturbs behaviour in infected animals. However, the regulation of kynurenine biosynthesis during IAV infection remains elusive. Here we showed that IAV infection induced expression of interferons (IFNs), which upregulated production of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1), which catalysed the kynurenine biosynthesis...
November 18, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860263/activation-and-clustering-of-a-plasmodium-falciparum-var-gene-are-affected-by-subtelomeric-sequences
#11
Michael F Duffy, Jingyi Tang, Fransisca Sumardy, Hanh H T Nguyen, Shamista A Selvarajah, Gabrielle A Josling, Karen P Day, Michaela Petter, Graham V Brown
The P. falciparum var multigene family encodes the cytoadhesive, variant antigen PfEMP1. P. falciparum antigenic variation and cytoadhesion specificity are controlled by epigenetic switching between the single, or few, simultaneously expressed var genes. Most var genes are maintained in perinuclear clusters of heterochromatic telomeres. The active var gene(s) occupy a single, perinuclear var expression site. It is unresolved whether the var expression site forms in situ at a telomeric cluster or whether it is an extant compartment to which single chromosomes travel, thus controlling var switching...
November 18, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860412/cryo-protective-effect-of-an-ice-binding-protein-derived-from-antarctic-bacteria
#12
Marco Mangiagalli, Maya Bar-Dolev, Pietro Tedesco, Antonino Natalello, Aleksei Kaleda, Stefania Brocca, Donatella de Pascale, Sandra Pucciarelli, Cristina Miceli, Ido Bravslavsky, Marina Lotti
Cold environments are populated by organisms able to contravene deleterious effects of low temperature by diverse adaptive strategies, including the production of ice binding proteins (IBPs) that inhibit the growth of ice crystals inside and outside cells. We describe the properties of such a protein (EfcIBP) identified in the metagenome of an Antarctic biological consortium composed by the ciliate Euplotes focardii and psychrophilic non-cultured bacteria. Recombinant EfcIBP can resist freezing without any conformational damage and is moderately heat stable, with a Tm of 66...
November 17, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860287/proteoglycan-neofunctions-regulation-of-inflammation-and-autophagy-in-cancer-biology
#13
Liliana Schaefer, Claudia Tredup, Maria A Gubbiotti, Renato V Iozzo
Inflammation and autophagy have emerged as prominent issues in the context of proteoglycan signaling. In particular, two small, leucine-rich proteoglycans, biglycan and decorin, play pivotal roles in the regulation of these vital cellular pathways and, as such, are intrinsically involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this minireview we will address novel functions of biglycan and decorin in inflammation and autophagy, and analyze new emerging signaling events triggered by these proteoglycans, which directly or indirectly modulate these processes...
November 17, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860283/integration-of-a-proton-antenna-facilitates-transport-activity-of-the-monocarboxylate-transporter-mct4
#14
Sina Ibne Noor, Jacques Pouyssegur, Joachim W Deitmer, Holger M Becker
Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes...
November 15, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863012/maxed-out-macs-physiologic-cell-clearance-as-a-function-of-macrophage-phagocytic-capacity
#15
REVIEW
Clive S Zent, Michael R Elliott
The phagocytic clearance of host cells is important for eliminating dying cells and for the therapeutic clearance of antibody-targeted cells. As ubiquitous, motile and highly phagocytic immune cells, macrophages are principal players in the phagocytic removal of host cells throughout the body. In recent years great strides have been made in identifying the molecular mechanisms that control the recognition and phagocytosis of cells by macrophages. However, much less is known about the physical and metabolic constraints that govern the amount of cellular material macrophages can ingest and how these limitations affect the overall efficiency of host cell clearance in health and disease...
November 14, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862971/structural-snapshots-of-the-%C3%AE-barrel-assembly-machinery
#16
REVIEW
Jeremy Bakelar, Susan K Buchanan, Nicholas Noinaj
The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is a multi-component complex responsible for the biogenesis of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in Gram-negative bacteria, with conserved systems in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Given its importance in the integrity of the outer membrane and in the assembly of surface exposed virulence factors, BAM is an attractive therapeutic target against pathogenic bacteria, particularly multi-drug resistant strains. While the mechanism for how BAM functions remains elusive, previous structural studies have described each of the individual components of BAM, offering only a few clues to how the complex functions...
November 14, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860274/mechanistic-roles-of-autophagy-in-hematopoietic-differentiation
#17
REVIEW
Thomas Riffelmacher, Anna-Katharina Simon
Autophagy is increasingly recognized for its active role in development and differentiation. In particular, its role in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells has been extensively studied, likely because blood cells are accessible, easy to identify and purify and their progenitor tree is well defined. This review aims to discuss the mechanisms by which autophagy impacts on differentiation, using hematopoietic cell types as examples. Autophagy's roles include the re-modeling during terminal differentiation, the maintenance of a long-lived cell type, and the regulation of the balance between self-renewal and quiescence in stem-like cells...
November 14, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862967/regulation-of-bacterial-cell-wall-growth
#18
REVIEW
Alexander J F Egan, Robert M Cleverley, Katharina Peters, Richard J Lewis, Waldemar Vollmer
During growth and propagation a bacterial cell enlarges and subsequently divides its peptidoglycan (PG) sacculus, a continuous mesh-like layer that encases the cell membrane to confer mechanical strength and morphological robustness. The mechanism of sacculus growth, how it is regulated, and how it is coordinated with other cellular processes is poorly understood. In this article we will discuss briefly the current knowledge of how cell wall synthesis is regulated, on multiple levels, from both sides of the cytoplasmic membrane...
November 12, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863020/kinetics-of-binding-of-fluorescent-ligands-to-enzymes-with-engineered-access-tunnels
#19
Shubhangi Kaushik, Zbynek Prokop, Jiri Damborsky, Radka Chaloupkova
Molecular recognition mechanisms and kinetics of binding of ligands to buried active sites via access tunnels are not well understood. Fluorescence polarization enables rapid and non-destructive real-time quantification of the association between small fluorescent ligands and large biomolecules. In this study, we describe analysis of binding kinetics of fluorescent ligands resembling linear halogenated alkanes to haloalkane dehalogenases. Dehalogenases possess buried active sites connected to the surrounding solvent by access tunnels...
November 9, 2016: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896916/dihydroartemisinin-counteracts-fibrotic-portal-hypertension-via-farnesoid-x-receptor-dependent-inhibition-of-hepatic-stellate-cell-contraction
#20
Wenxuan Xu, Chunfeng Lu, Feng Zhang, Jiangjuan Shao, Shunyu Yao, Shizhong Zheng
Portal hypertension is a frequent pathological symptom occurring especially in hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. Current paradigms indicate that inhibition of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and contraction is anticipated to be an attractive therapeutic strategy, because activated HSC dominantly facilitates an increase in intrahepatic vein pressure through secreting extracellular matrix and contracting. Our previous in vitro study indicated that dihydroartemisinin (DHA) inhibited contractility of cultured HSC by activating intracellular farnesoid X receptor (FXR)...
November 7, 2016: FEBS Journal
journal
journal
40797
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"