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Indian Journal of Medical Ethics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29289932/vaccination-marketing-by-private-healthcare-sector-glaring-malpractices
#1
Vipin Vashistha
The editorial by Jesani and Johari in this journal raises some contentious yet relevant ethical issues pertaining to vaccination practices in India. Vaccination is one of the most important preventive measures against infectious diseases. The eradication of smallpox in the 70s and near eradication of polio are testimony to this. The Government of India (GoI) has recently added a few new vaccines in its Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP), one of the largest public health programmes across the globe. The number of vaccines delivered through this public health programme has doubled from six in 1985 to twelve in 2017...
December 21, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284592/comparison-of-ethical-issues-in-indian-and-new-zealand-prospective-studies-of-cervical-pre-cancer
#2
Charlotte Paul
The aim was to compare the ethics of historical Indian and New Zealand prospective studies of cervical pre-cancer in terms of: scientific justification, potential harms and benefits to subjects, informed consent procedures, monitoring and stopping, and exploitation. The New Zealand study had poorer scientific justification, greater harm to subjects, absence of informed consent, and greater exploitation. Reasons proposed for on-going criticism of the Indian study are: semantic confusion, lack of consistent detail about informed consent procedures, and failure of a professional obligation to provide on-going medical care...
December 12, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251607/revisiting-new-zealand-s-unfortunate-experiment-is-medical-ethics-ever-a-thing-done
#3
Sharon Batt
An experiment dating from the 1960s in New Zealand has eerie similarities to research begun in 1976 in India. In both cases, women with evidence of early cervical cancer or pre-cancer went untreated, despite known treatments that could have prevented their condition from worsening. This Comment on carcinoma cervix research grew out of my reading of a new book by Ronald W Jones about the New Zealand experiment. Jones, a recently retired obstetrician/gynaecologist, worked at the hospital where the controversial research took place and was a whistleblower in the case...
December 7, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251600/a-few-shades-fairer-please
#4
Rakhi Ghoshal
This piece critically reflects on the growing Indian desire for fairer shades of skin. While skin-whitening products vanish off store shelves, notwithstanding protests against such products, the event that generated a storm some time ago in the media was the Garbha Sanskar workshops. In these workshops, women were allegedly taught methods to purify their wombs and beget fairer (and taller) children. In this article I argue that not only is it simplistic to label this ideology regressive, but that it becomes rather difficult to criticise the sanskaris because of the "register" they employ, ie the language they use to rationalise and explain their actions...
November 30, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251604/social-media-and-physicians-the-indian-scenario
#5
Prateek Singh, Himani Tak
Consent and ethics are integral to a physician's work. Patient images have been used for multiple purposes in medical practice; as an adjunct to clinical care, displayed to colleagues, students and other audiences in educational settings, and published in medical journals. But nowadays there is an increasing trend towards sharing patient pictures and videos online, on social media platforms. Though usually shared privately with friends, these photographs and videos end up in the public domain, accessible to everyone...
November 23, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251601/walking-blood-banks-an-immediate-solution-to-rural-india-s-blood-drought
#6
Rachita Sood, Nakul Raykar, Brian Till, Hemant Shah, Nobhojit Roy
The current system of blood banks in India is such that rural patients are deprived of timely access to an adequate volume of life-saving blood, adding to preventable mortality. On the basis of an academic framework for a blood transfusion system, we describe an alternative approach in which rural practitioners utilise unbanked blood transfusions from a voluntary pool of pre-screened donors. This system would provide safe blood - as evidenced by international experience and limited projected increase in transfusion-transmissible infection in India - at a fraction of the financial cost imposed by the current system...
November 23, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251608/manufacturing-the-truth-from-designing-clinical-trials-to-publishing-trial-data
#7
Margaret Whitstock
This paper expands on some of the points made by Deepak Natarajan on techniques used in designing clinical trials of new drugs to ensure favourable outcomes. It also considers the nexus between the manufacturers of new drugs and the publishers of medical journals in which edited versions of these favourable outcomes are presented to the medical fraternity. The argument will be illustrated by referring to the clinical trials of rofecoxib (Vioxx®) and etoricoxib (Arcoxia®). Both these drugs are COX-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) manufactured by Merck and Co...
November 14, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251599/three-parent-baby-is-it-ethical
#8
Neha Dahiya, Suneela Garg
The UK was the first country to legalise mitochondrial donation in October 2015. In 2016, the first three-parent baby was born in Mexico and the US Food and Drug Administration declared that further research on mitochondrial donation is ethically permissible. It has now become an important issue, raising as it does, the spectre of "genetically modified designer babies".
November 14, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251603/medical-ethics-in-times-of-conflict-why-silence-is-not-an-option
#9
John Chisholm, Julian Sheather
In this commentary we argue that medical ethics has a key role in discussing the effects of conflicts and other violent human rights abuses. Contemporary medical ethics is an emerging academic discipline without clearly defined boundaries and we have no desire to impose them. We are seeking instead to indicate the kinds of issues that naturally and ordinarily arise within its purview. Recent history has seen a closer relationship and interdependency between medicine and the state. This has led, at times, to tension between professional obligations and state interests...
November 7, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251602/controlled-human-infection-models-for-vaccine-development-zika-virus-debate
#10
Vijayaprasad Gopichandran
An ethics panel, convened by the National Institute of Health and other research bodies in the USA, disallowed researchers from the Johns Hopkins University and University of Vermont from performing controlled human infection of healthy volunteers to develop a vaccine against Zika virus infection. The members published their ethical analysis and recommendations in February 2017. They have elaborated on the risks posed by human challenge with Zika virus to the volunteers and other uninvolved third parties and have systematically analysed the social value of such a human challenge experiment...
October 31, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251606/issues-in-access-to-end-of-life-care-in-low-resource-areas
#11
Yogesh Jain, Gajanan Phutke
Even though 1% of people require palliative and end-of-life care in low-resource situations, it remains an uncharted arena. Yet it is as important as curative care to alleviate suffering. Palliative care is not only a need in cancer and HIV disease; but is needed in a diverse group of illnesses ranging from tuberculosis, renal failures, paraplegia to chronic lung diseases. In a lower resource setting, the gaps in palliation may be the need for more technology and interventions or more healthcare professionals...
October 25, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29251605/henry-molaison-s-operation-for-epilepsy-a-case-study-in-medical-ethics
#12
Sunil K Pandya
Dr. William Beecher Scoville, an eminent American neurosurgeon of the 1940s, offered to treat Mr Molaison for his intractable epilepsy. During the operation, he removed large portions of both of Mr. Molaison's temporal lobes. Such an operation had never been performed earlier as the function of these parts of the brain was not clearly understood and neurosurgeons such as Dr. Wilder Penfield of Canada feared they could cause grave damage to the patient. Mr. Molaison developed severe loss of memory to the extent that a few minutes after meeting someone, he had no recollection of the meeting and he could not find his way to his own home...
October 13, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233798/reading-caplan-in-karachi
#13
Farhat Moazam
Bioethics education and discussions about ethical dilemmas are being increasingly reduced to teaching students how to balance the four, easily memorised philosophical principles popularised by influential American philosophers Tom Beauchamp and Jim Childress. The reality is that human beings approach and comprehend moral issues in diverse ways shaped by shared histories, cultural norms and values, kinship systems, lived experiences and existing socio-political realities. Therefore, ethical discourse limited to a culturally myopic Principlism that disregards the indigenous landscape can be an abstract and meaningless venture...
October 5, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125466/the-science-in-the-p-value-need-for-a-rethinking
#14
EDITORIAL
Mala Ramanathan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971829/tax-free-sanitary-napkins
#15
LETTER
Rupal Singh, Vijay Thawani
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918380/it-is-not-enough-to-grieve-we-must-learn-from-gorakhpur
#16
EDITORIAL
Yogesh Jain, Keshav Desiraju
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28803224/broadening-the-argument-on-limb-lengthening
#17
Alok Sarin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28803220/deaths-following-pentavalent-vaccine-and-the-revised-aefi-classification
#18
LETTER
Jacob Puliyel, Anant Phadke
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971830/can-the-ayush-system-be-instrumental-in-achieving-universal-health-coverage-in-india
#19
Janmejaya Samal, Ranjit Kumar Dehury
Universal health coverage (UHC) in the Indian context is understood as easily accessible and affordable health services for all citizens. The Planning Commission of India constituted a High Level Expert Group (HLEG) in October 2010 for the purpose of drafting the guidelines of UHC. While the primary focus of UHC is to provide financial protection to all citizens, its delivery requires an adequate health infrastructure, skilled health human resources, and access to affordable drugs and technologies so that all people receive the level and quality of care they are entitled to...
September 26, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971831/selfless-giving-in-medicine-a-study-of-altruistic-attitudes-among-medical-students
#20
S Sanjai, Vijayaprasad Gopichandran
INTRODUCTION: An important virtue in the medical profession is altruism, which makes a doctor serve without an excess of expectation of return. OBJECTIVES: To assess the level of altruism and factors influencing altruism among medical students at a medical college in Chennai. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 224 students from the first, third and fourth years. We prepared a questionnaire which contained questions from the previously validated Altruistic Personality Scale...
September 19, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
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