Read by QxMD icon Read

Indian Journal of Medical Ethics

Lars H Breimer, Torbjörn K Nilsson, Michael E Breimer
Declaration of conflicts of interest (COI, understood mainly as financial) in medical publications is long established. Most journals refer only to the guidelines of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) but not to those of the WAME (World Association of Medical Editors). We surveyed 17 journals and found only one (BJOG), which explicitly mentioned "religious interest" as an example of a possible COI and one other journal included "personal belief" (Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of India) as a COI...
February 7, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Simisola O Akintola, Olohikhuae O Egbokhare
This paper examines the legal aspects of parenthood and how it is, or could be, determined in Nigeria given the wide popularity and uptake of assisted reproductive technology (ART). It aims to establish whether the existing national laws can sufficiently protect the interests of the child who is born and of the consumers, with an emphasis on the determination of the status of the parents. It also identifies problems and proposes solutions with regard to the specific issue of establishing legal parenthood following the use of ART, either with or without state regulation...
January 30, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Nilesh Shah, Avinash Alan De Sousa
Compulsory service programmes for MBBS students have existed for many years in India and other parts of the world. Such programmes have been referred to differently as "obligatory", "mandatory", "requisite" and "compulsory" service. Governments look at these programmes as a means to deploy and retain the health workforce even as health professionals are lost to opportunities in other countries. Though these programmes have been successful, they have been carried out by enforcement on medical students to finish a rural bond...
January 23, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Adsa Fatima, Aarthi Chandrasekhar, Amita Pitre
Five years since Nirbhaya, and nearly as long since the Justice Verma Committee Report, amendments to the Criminal Law Amendment Act 2013, and the National guidelines and protocols on medico-legal care for survivors of sexual violence by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) 2014, we, concerned individuals, women's groups, health organisations, ethicists, and academicians, urgently demand the attention of the central and state governments - to the continuing injustice, violations and discrimination against survivors of gender-based violence (GBV)...
January 18, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Praveen Gadde, Anitha Akkaloori
The World Medical Association (WMA) provides ethical guidance to physicians through its Declarations, Resolutions and Statements. WMA first adopted its resolution on physician participation in capital punishment in 1981, which then amended in 2000 and 2008. The revised Declaration of Geneva was adopted by the World Medical Association General Assembly on October 14, 2017, in Chicago. WMA reaffirmed that it is unethical for physicians to participate in capital punishment, in any way, or during any step of the execution process, including its planning and the instruction and/or training of persons to perform executions...
January 8, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Sunita V S Bandewar, Amita Aggarwal, Rajeev Kumar, Rakesh Aggarwal, Peush Sahni, Sanjay A Pai
The Medical Council of India (MCI) must be commended for its efforts to introduce definitive criteria for appointments and promotions for teachers in medical institutions. On June 8, 2017, the MCI issued a circular to amend the Minimum Qualifications for Teachers in Medical Institutions Regulations, 1998 (henceforth Regulations, 1998). The amendment clarifies the minimum qualifications required for various postgraduate teaching positions in medical colleges. It indicates MCI's sustained engagement with qualifications of teachers in medical colleges, with the aim of enhancing the quality of teaching and thereby the quality of medical professionals passing out...
December 29, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Vipin Vashistha
The editorial by Jesani and Johari in this journal raises some contentious yet relevant ethical issues pertaining to vaccination practices in India. Vaccination is one of the most important preventive measures against infectious diseases. The eradication of smallpox in the 70s and near eradication of polio are testimony to this. The Government of India (GoI) has recently added a few new vaccines in its Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP), one of the largest public health programmes across the globe. The number of vaccines delivered through this public health programme has doubled from six in 1985 to twelve in 2017...
December 21, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
B N Gangadhar, Santosh K Chaturvedi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Rakhi Ghoshal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Vivek Divan
Although over 15 years in the making, the HIV legislation has recently been passed in India. This Act is unique in many respects, and hopefully a precursor to broader health sector legislation. The process of law making in this instance included a robust consultative process with civil society and other stakeholders involved with HIV. Some of the unique aspects of the Act, as it was eventually passed, include an anti-discrimination provision to cover violations by the private sector, and concrete provisions to ensure informed consent while seeking HIV-related testing and treatment, and confidentiality of HIV status...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Rakhi Ghoshal
The relation between science and society is, simply put, very complex. In the history of global bioethics, it is the Code of Nuremberg which foregrounded the acute ways in which biomedical/scientific research could (negatively) impact society; this 1947 Code became the point of reference for subsequent research concerning humans. The Code "required that medical experiments on human beings must have the potential to yield fruitful results for the good of society". The Declaration of Helsinki (DoH), 1964 reinstated this concern by stressing that "clinical research cannot be legitimately carried out unless the risks to participants are justified by the importance of the research" - invoking the idea of the "social value" of research...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Farhat Moazam
Bioethics education and discussions about ethical dilemmas are being increasingly reduced to teaching students how to balance the four, easily memorised philosophical principles popularised by influential American philosophers Tom Beauchamp and Jim Childress. The reality is that human beings approach and comprehend moral issues in diverse ways shaped by shared histories, cultural norms and values, kinship systems, lived experiences and existing socio-political realities. Therefore, ethical discourse limited to a culturally myopic Principlism that disregards the indigenous landscape can be an abstract and meaningless venture...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Charlotte Paul
The aim was to compare the ethics of historical Indian and New Zealand prospective studies of cervical pre-cancer in terms of: scientific justification, potential harms and benefits to subjects, informed consent procedures, monitoring and stopping, and exploitation. The New Zealand study had poorer scientific justification, greater harm to subjects, absence of informed consent, and greater exploitation. Reasons proposed for on-going criticism of the Indian study are: semantic confusion, lack of consistent detail about informed consent procedures, and failure of a professional obligation to provide on-going medical care...
December 12, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Sharon Batt
An experiment dating from the 1960s in New Zealand has eerie similarities to research begun in 1976 in India. In both cases, women with evidence of early cervical cancer or pre-cancer went untreated, despite known treatments that could have prevented their condition from worsening. This Comment on carcinoma cervix research grew out of my reading of a new book by Ronald W Jones about the New Zealand experiment. Jones, a recently retired obstetrician/gynaecologist, worked at the hospital where the controversial research took place and was a whistleblower in the case...
December 7, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Rakhi Ghoshal
This piece critically reflects on the growing Indian desire for fairer shades of skin. While skin-whitening products vanish off store shelves, notwithstanding protests against such products, the event that generated a storm some time ago in the media was the Garbha Sanskar workshops. In these workshops, women were allegedly taught methods to purify their wombs and beget fairer (and taller) children. In this article I argue that not only is it simplistic to label this ideology regressive, but that it becomes rather difficult to criticise the sanskaris because of the "register" they employ, ie the language they use to rationalise and explain their actions...
November 30, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Prateek Singh, Himani Tak
Consent and ethics are integral to a physician's work. Patient images have been used for multiple purposes in medical practice; as an adjunct to clinical care, displayed to colleagues, students and other audiences in educational settings, and published in medical journals. But nowadays there is an increasing trend towards sharing patient pictures and videos online, on social media platforms. Though usually shared privately with friends, these photographs and videos end up in the public domain, accessible to everyone...
November 23, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Rachita Sood, Nakul Raykar, Brian Till, Hemant Shah, Nobhojit Roy
The current system of blood banks in India is such that rural patients are deprived of timely access to an adequate volume of life-saving blood, adding to preventable mortality. On the basis of an academic framework for a blood transfusion system, we describe an alternative approach in which rural practitioners utilise unbanked blood transfusions from a voluntary pool of pre-screened donors. This system would provide safe blood - as evidenced by international experience and limited projected increase in transfusion-transmissible infection in India - at a fraction of the financial cost imposed by the current system...
November 23, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Margaret Whitstock
This paper expands on some of the points made by Deepak Natarajan on techniques used in designing clinical trials of new drugs to ensure favourable outcomes. It also considers the nexus between the manufacturers of new drugs and the publishers of medical journals in which edited versions of these favourable outcomes are presented to the medical fraternity. The argument will be illustrated by referring to the clinical trials of rofecoxib (Vioxx®) and etoricoxib (Arcoxia®). Both these drugs are COX-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) manufactured by Merck and Co...
November 14, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Neha Dahiya, Suneela Garg
The UK was the first country to legalise mitochondrial donation in October 2015. In 2016, the first three-parent baby was born in Mexico and the US Food and Drug Administration declared that further research on mitochondrial donation is ethically permissible. It has now become an important issue, raising as it does, the spectre of "genetically modified designer babies".
November 14, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
John Chisholm, Julian Sheather
In this commentary we argue that medical ethics has a key role in discussing the effects of conflicts and other violent human rights abuses. Contemporary medical ethics is an emerging academic discipline without clearly defined boundaries and we have no desire to impose them. We are seeking instead to indicate the kinds of issues that naturally and ordinarily arise within its purview. Recent history has seen a closer relationship and interdependency between medicine and the state. This has led, at times, to tension between professional obligations and state interests...
November 7, 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"