Read by QxMD icon Read

Indian Journal of Medical Ethics

Vijayaprasad Gopichandran
This comment contains the reflections of a first-time participant in the 13th International Association of Bioethics Congress (IAB 2016), held from June 14 to 17, 2016, in Edinburgh. At the outset, I would like to make a couple of clarifications. First, the opinions expressed here are my personal reflections and second, I am a physician and public health practitioner by profession and my interest is bioethics. I reflect on the justice implications of the IAB 2016 from the perspective of the challenge of maintaining inclusivity in a multidisciplinary bioethics world...
September 29, 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
John H Noble
There are always rival hypotheses to explain away the one that is posited as the most likely to be true. Context and Occam's razor - the principle that among competing hypotheses, the one with the fewest assumptions should be selected - ultimately point to which hypothesis is the most likely to be true.
September 22, 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Soolmaz Moosavi, Fariba Borhani, Mohaddeseh Mohsenpour
An ethical attitude denotes motivation and commitment in practice and is an important aspect of human communication. Values guide the efforts of human beings towards helping those in need, and an ethical attitude revives values and turns them into action. As a result, an ethical attitude and a sense of responsibility have direct effects on ethical action and ultimately, on the outcome of patient care.
September 7, 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Ian Harris
I read with interest the comment by Mark Wilson in the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics regarding bias and conflicts of interest in medical journals. Wilson targets one journal (the New England Journal of Medicine: NEJM) and one particular "scandal" to make his point that journals' decisions on publication are biased by commercial conflicts of interest (CoIs). It is interesting that he chooses the NEJM which, by his own admission, had one of the strictest CoI policies and had published widely on this topic...
August 24, 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Anupama Sukhlecha
Incentives, pay hikes and timely promotions enhance the job performance of an employee. In medical institutes, too, satisfied teachers would train students in a better way leading to better equipped doctors and ultimately, greater patient satisfaction. A study in Malaysia links high levels of satisfaction of employees with good salary, promotions, and incentives.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Himmatrao Saluba Bawaskar
Daily, I receive 3-4 social media messages regarding the diagnosis, management or clinical dilemmas of acute timelimiting medical emergencies due to snake bite and scorpion sting poisoning. I respond to the caller who has shared clinical signs and symptoms. I also follow up on the progress of the victim. I send pdf files of my publications on scorpion and snake bite.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Mrinal Prakash Barua, Vivek Mishra, Mukesh Singla
In the wake of the Medical Council of India's (MCI) take on the promotion of faculty recently, it is clear that the faculty of medical institutions across the country are in a state of alarm. A situation in which the whole onus of research is put on the faculty is quite quirky when there is no consideration of the fact that most medical colleges in India do not have a system of intramural funding, apt infrastructure and a pertinent environment for carrying out good research.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Avinash DeSousa
Over-the-counter use of medication via chemists, including the use of psychiatric medication, has always been a cause of worry in the Indian subcontinent. Over the last two years, the rules on dispensing psychiatric medication have become stringent and chemists have to dispense the exact amount of medicine written on the prescription for the time duration mentioned. The chemist also stamps the prescription with the amount of medicine dispensed so that the patient does not use the prescription at another chemist's or counter to obtain more than the amount prescribed...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Reeta S Mani
The white and fluffy mycelial growth that I had observed 48 hours ago had turned a mottled grey. I inverted the plate of Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) to examine its reverse. A sinister ochre stared at me.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Ravindra B Ghooi, Kelly Dhru, Sheela Jaywant
Many individuals at the end of life are unable to convey their wishes regarding medical treatments. Advance directives (ADs) or living wills (LWs) allow them to crystallise their wishes in a written form so that these can be carried out if the relevant situation arises. In many countries, ADs are legally valid and enforceable; they reduce the use of life-sustaining treatments, which often merely prolong life without improving or even maintaining the quality of life. Such treatment puts a financial burden on the patient's family, often leading to penury...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Mukul Inamdar, Michael Ashley Stein, Joske Bunders
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) requires States to replace their mental health laws based on substitute decision-making for persons with mental health issues with laws based on the supported decision-making paradigm. However, the exact scope of the CRPD's mandates is currently under debate, especially in the case of persons with very high support needs. The Mental Health Care Bill, 2013, introduces supported decision-making in India in the form of advance directives and nominated representatives...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Jagdish Patel, Siddarth David
Rapid industrialisation in India is giving employment to millions of people in the formal sector, and many more in the unorganised sector. However, the absence of clear policies, poorly enforced regulations, lack of systematic reporting of occupational diseases, lamentable socioeconomic conditions of the workers and their limited access to healthcare make occupational health and safety (OHS) a critical area.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
George Thomas
In 1956, the four-year-old republic of India replaced the colonial Indian Medical Council with the Medical Council of India (MCI). This institution was meant to guide the young republic in establishing a modern system of medical education and developing the human resources to provide the most appropriate medical care to all citizens.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Prem Pais
I read with interest the comment by Mark Wilson, which deals with possible conflict of interest (CoI) affecting publications in academic medical journals. This comment has specifically targeted the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and its editor-in-chief Jeffrey Drazen on the "Vioxx scandal" which broke 15 years ago. Wilson's comment seems to be in response to a blog by Natarajan on CoI in medical publications. In the blog Natarajan writes of commercial CoI biasing publication of clinical trials and cites, among other examples, a publication in the NEJM on trials of voriconazole...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
James M Brophy
I read with interest Mark Wilson's recent article, "The New England Journal of Medicine: commercial conflict of interest and revisiting the Vioxx scandal". I believe this is an important contribution that underlines the aphorism "Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it." As Vioxx is a seminal example, it is important to place it in its proper context, examining if this malfeasance extends beyond the VIGOR study. While the epicentre of this conflict of interest surely begins with the sponsor, I believe the following essay demonstrates that this wave of egregiously unethical behaviour can exist and be propagated only with the complicity of academic investigators, medical journals, a flawed peer-review system and an uncritical medical readership...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Ruth Macklin
In his excellent article about commercial conflict of interest, Mark Wilson quotes Dennis Thompson, a political scientist who provided a searching analysis of the concept of conflict of interest (Col). Using Thompson's analysis, Wilson writes: "Determining whether factors such as ambition, the pursuit of fame and financial gain had biased a judgment was challenging. Motives are not always clear to either the conflicted party or to an outside observer." In this commentary, I aim to broaden the discussion beyond the narrowly commercial aspects of Col...
October 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Habibeh Ahmadipour, Reza Vafadar
Mistreatment of medical students is a major source of stress for them. Studies indicate a high incidence of such mistreatment, especially in clinical settings. In most cases, students who have been mistreated do not report it to the authorities. This study investigated factors related to the failure to report mistreatment. This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Kerman Medical School, Iran. All students in the internship and clerkship stages, as well as residents, were selected through the census method...
July 12, 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Susmita Chandramouleeswaran, Natasha Catherine Edwin, Wesley Rajaleelan
The use of drugs to enhance cognitive function and academic performance is clearly a global phenomenon, with the reported prevalence of stimulant use among medical students ranging from 15-20%. A multi-institution study from the USA reported a 6.9% lifetime prevalence of non-prescription use of cognitive enhancers among college students. A comprehensive systematic review indicates a 16-29% use of non-prescribed stimulants among all students for reasons that include increasing concentration and alertness. While mental health professionals and guidance counsellors anecdotally recall requests for pharmacological cognitive enhancement from otherwise healthy students, the exact magnitude of this problem in the Indian context is not clear...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
D S Sheriff
"She wasn't like you...wasn't like any politician I've ever known." Ethan Kanin, Secretary of State about US president Allison Taylor in the US serial, 24. When an ethical dilemma arises, the choices we make decide our ethical concerns and moral position in a given situation. In the TV serial, 24, the US president faces such an ethical dilemma when she has to either cover up for her daughter's crime or get her arrested. She is torn between the role of a mother and that of a President. She chooses her sworn duty to protect the country and has her daughter arrested...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Suravi Patra
Across the world, homosexuality is gaining legitimacy; stigma and discrimination are gradually giving way to equality and inclusion. The situation in India is in stark contrast to these trends. In this country, homosexuality is an offence as per Section 377 of the IPC. The homosexual community is fighting for its rights and continues to suffer from intense stigma and discrimination. Their healthcare needs are not at all attended to; their sexual orientation is conceptualised as a socially deviant mental disease that needs psychiatric treatment...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"